Contents of the ‘Reference’ category in chronological order.

Le Nouvel Economiste: ‘Prince Karim Aga Khan – Reflections in a Golden Eye’ (Paris, France)

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New York Times: ‘Do Business and Islam Mix? Ask Him’ (New York, USA)

The Aga Khan congratulating graduates of a midwife training course in Afghanistan that was sponsored by the Aga Khan Development Network. (Image Gary Otte/AKDN)

The Aga Khan congratulating graduates of a midwife training course in Afghanistan that was sponsored by the Aga Khan Development Network. (Image Gary Otte/AKDN)

He is a moderate Muslim religious leader and a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad. He is also a twice-married jet-setter, and he owns hundreds of racehorses, valuable stud farms, an exclusive yacht club on Sardinia and a lavish estate near Paris.

He has poured money into poorer, neglected parts of the world, often into businesses as basic as making fish nets, plastic bags and matches, while also teaming up with private-equity powerhouses like the Blackstone Group on a huge $750 million hydroelectric system in Uganda.

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AKDN Press Release: ‘Aga Khan Receives Tolerance Award from the Evangelical Academy of Tutzing’ (Tutzing, Germany)

His Highness the Aga Khan, Imam (spiritual leader) of the Ismaili Muslims and founder of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), said today that the revolutionary impact of globalisation and record levels of international migration require development of a new “cosmopolitan ethic” to support constructive pluralism and greater tolerance among different cultures and societies.

He was speaking at the Evangelische Akademie Tutzing (Evangelical Academy of Tutzing) where he received the Tolerance Award in recognition of his efforts to promote greater understanding and respect between peoples and cultures and for his dedication towards social, cultural and economic development in some of the world’s poorest countries.

In accepting the Award, the Aga Khan noted that increasing global migration means “peoples who once lived across the world from one another now live across the street”.

But societies which have grown more pluralistic in makeup are not always growing more pluralistic in spirit. What is needed — all across the world — is a new “cosmopolitan ethic” rooted in a strong culture of tolerance.

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Lauditory address by German Foreign Minister Steinmeier at the presentation of the Tutzing Evangelical Academy Tolerance Prize to His Highness the Aga Khan (Tutzing, Germany)

Your Highness,
Ladies and Gentlemen:

According to Ilya Trojanov: “The world is wide and salvation lurks everywhere!”

But it is not at all easy to find! That is why foreign ministers are perpetually on the move. For many, salvation is yet to be found, but while searching for it I have met a man who yesterday was my guest and today is yours.

We are honouring an exceptional man. We are honouring a great friend of humanity, a courageous visionary, a builder of bridges between religions and society.

We are honouring a man whom, through our conversations, I have discovered to be exceptionally intelligent, knowledgeable and pleasant to talk to. A citizen of the world who intrepidly fights day after day against resentment and backwardness on almost every continent.

A man who shows us a face of Islam that many of us do not know and sadly all too often we do not want to know: an Islam that is open, tolerant and willing to engage in dialogue. An Islam that is not in conflict with free, democratic and pluralistic societies. In short: I cannot imagine a more appropriate winner of the Tolerance Award than His Highness the Aga Khan!

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‘Expression’ published in the Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada)

Most of us seek societies that are at once plural and peaceful — a goal that is important but also elusive. For even our best efforts to combine stability with modernity seem to be constantly disrupted.

Some of these disruptions come from new technologies — from Internet blogs to bio-genetics. Others spring from nature — from changing weather patterns or mutating viruses. Still others arise from social transformations — new patterns of family life or enormous migrations of people.

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AKDN Press Release: ‘Aga Khan Says More Relevant Education, Stronger Civil Society Institutions and renewed commitment to ethical standards are key to stability of modern democracies’ (Evora, Portugal)

Modern societies must improve the rigour and relevance of their educational curricula, strengthen the institutions of civil society and build a strong ethical framework of tolerance and respect if they are to be stable and secure democracies, able to protect the interests of their citizens, His Highness the Aga Khan said today.

He was speaking at an international symposium at the University of Évora entitled: “Cosmopolitan Society, Human Safety and Rights in Plural and Peaceful Societies.” Earlier in the day, the Aga Khan was awarded the Honoris CausaDoctor Degree at a University ceremony presided over by Portuguese President, Jorge Sampaio and Rector, Manuel Patricio. Attendees included the Portuguese Minister for State and Foreign Affairs, Diogo Freitas do Amaral, international diplomatic representatives, members of the senate and faculty of the university, and local dignitaries.

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Ottawa Citizen: ‘The Aga Khan’s Cairo Miracle – Turning A 500-Year-Old Garbage Dump Into A Park’ (Ottawa, Canada)

IN 1984, THE AGA KHAN, leader of the world’s Ismaili Muslims, climbed the winding stairs to the tops of minarets in Old Cairo. The sepia-coloured cityscape spread before him. A profusion of domes and minarets decorated the sky; their ornate forms making visible the spirit of the 1,000-year-old city.

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The Daily Star: ‘Entrepreneur to the developing world’, Pranay Gupte and Jack Freeman, (Beirut, Lebanon)

One of world’s wealthiest men, leader of Ismaili Muslims focuses on local projects to enhance sustainable development

Prince Karim, Aga Khan IV, has been called one of the world’s wealthiest men and is a seasoned philanthropist, but he is doing more than giving his millions away in developing countries. The spiritual leader of 15 million Shiite Ismaili Muslims spread over 25 nations, the Aga Khan is changing the face of global philanthropy by establishing innovative ventures and providing micro-finance for small-scale enterprises through economic development institutions.

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New York Times: ‘For the Aga Khan, Buildings Are Bridges’ (New York, USA)

“The instability that we see around the world, from Afghanistan to Central Europe, is a consequence of the rejection of cultural pluralism,” said the Aga Khan, a man who knows a great deal about cultural pluralism.

He blames that rejection on the enormous gulf of knowledge between the Islamic and the non-Islamic world, a situation that, he said, leaves him deeply saddened.

It is late September, and the Aga Khan is speaking to an interviewer in a Boston hotel suite, where he has come to introduce the latest brainchild of one of his favourite causes. Called ArchNet, a collaboration among the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, it is billed as the world’s largest on-line resource for the study of Islamic architecture, urban planning and landscape design.

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Comparison: Published vs AKDN versions of the Architectural Record Interview by Robert Ivy (New York, USA)

Please click on the icon for a side by side comparison in PDF format.

Below, is a shorter version of the interview transcript published in Architectural Record, and here in the Archive, is the more extensive version published by AKDN. Highlighted below are major portions nevertheless missing from the version published by AKDN.

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Globe and Mail: ‘Canada – “A model for the World”‘ (Toronto, Canada)

The wealthy Muslim leader and philanthropist was in Ottawa this week to discover the secret of the nation’s multicultural success. But he was critical of the U.S. for its simplistic views of good and evil. ‘I will not stigmatize a whole population as being evil, whether they are Muslim, Christian, Jew, Hindu. I can’t do that,’ he told John Stackhouse and Patrick Martin

In the dead of winter, the cold and grey of Ottawa is not an obvious destination for one of the world’s wealthiest and most influential men. With his own jet, an estate outside Paris, stables of horses and luxury hotels on several continents, the Aga Khan can choose to go almost anywhere.

Yet the handsome, wealthy and erudite leader of 15 million Ismaili Muslims said he was eager to spend two days this week in Ottawa because, after Sept. 11, he wants Canadians to know they are “a model for the world.”

“Canada is today the most successful pluralist society on the face of our globe, without any doubt in my mind…. That is something unique to Canada. It is an amazing global human asset,” he said.

“You have created a pluralist society where minorities, generally speaking, are welcome,” he continued. “They feel comfortable. They assimilate the Canadian psyche. They are allowed to move forward within civil society in an equitable manner. Their children are educated. And I’m not the one who is making the judgement. Look at the international evaluation of Canada as a country and the way it functions.”

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Earth Times News Service: ‘Prince Karim’s ascension to being the Aga Khan, spiritual leader of millions’ Pranay Gupte

In 1957, when Prince Karim was 20 years old and a student of Islamic history at Harvard, word arrived that his grandfather, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III, had died of a heart attack at the age of 80. “I had no expectation of being in a position to fulfil his responsibilities,” Karim says.

Sir Sultan, the spiritual leader of Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims — generally known as the Ismailis — whose sect of Shia Islam was founded in 765 A.D., had been ailing for some time, and Prince Karim and his brother Price Amyn had spent time with their grandfather prior to his death.

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Forbes Global: ‘Venture Capitalist to the Third World’ (London, United Kingdom)

Forbes Global, 31 May 1999

Forbes Global, 31 May 1999

Contents

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AKDN Press Release: ‘Aga Khan Outlines Path to Peace in Afghanistan’ (Aiglemont, France)

Ishkoshim, On the Afghan-Tajik Border, 28 September 1998 — In a powerful appeal to all Muslims in Afghanistan, Shia and Sunni alike, His Highness the Aga Khan, Imam (spiritual leader) of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, outlined a basis for constructing a new and more stable civil order in Central Asia.

All Afghans should, as promptly as possible, re-establish open and brotherly dialogue among themselves, as our Faith instructs us to do, so that Islam’s ethic of peace becomes a national reality…. We are not allowed to live in hate.

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Comparison: Published vs Institute of Ismaili Studies versions of the Brown University Commencement Address (Providence, Rhode Island, USA)

Please click on the icon for a side by side comparison in PDF format.

Below, and in the archive here, is the published version of this speech. Sections missing in the versions published on the Institute of Ismaili Studies’ website are in highlight; additions are in plain highlight.

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Pranay Gupte Interview, Newsweek (United States)

Pranay Gupte: How has your world changed in the 42 years that you have been the Aga Khan?

His Highness the Aga Khan: When my grandfather died 42 years ago, I had no expectation of being in a position to fulfil his responsibilities either in the Ismaili community or in development work. The world’s development environment was totally disabling. The notion of “Enabling Environment” has since become a fundamental premise for sustainable development, especially in emerging societies. The notion of pluralism — and the legitimacy of pluralism in human society — is also an important issue for us in development. The notion of regionalism where there is an attempt to optimise the use of resources for people in a way which goes past frontiers, and gives them the capacity to function more effectively in a wider context — that’s another issue. Sustainability is another fundamental issue because getting the process of development under way is one thing. But then ensuring that it continues under its own momentum with the people primarily involved leading and making decisions on their own destinies is really the goal.

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Preface to the book ‘Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today’, edited by Renata Holod (Aiglemont)

The first series of Awards in Architecture within the vast community of Muslims has been given. It is well to ponder a this time what they mean, what questions they raise, what implications they may have for the future, as well as for our deeper collective concern for the continuous integrity of Islamic architecture and, through architecture, for the whole of Islamic culture. I trust and hope that over the years scholars architects, planners, officials at all levels, and users will discuss among themselves the significance of the choices mad by the Jury and the Selection Committee among some on hundred eighty submitted buildings and architectural ensembles. Many even contradictory conclusions could and should be drawn from the Jury’s decisions, and I would like to share with you some impressions, some thoughts, some queries, per haps a few worries about the results of these choices.

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Comparison: Published vs Institute of Ismaili Studies versions of the Asia Society address (New York, USA)

Please click on the icon for a side by side comparison in PDF format.

Below, and in the archive here, is the published version of this speech. Sections missing in the version published on the Institute of Ismaili Studies’ website are in highlight; additions are in plain highlight.

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