I would underscore the growing potential of what some call PPP’s — public-private partnerships. Such collaborations can tap the unique strengths of both sectors, overcoming outmoded dogmas which depreciate the role of the market-driven enterprises on the one hand, or which denigrate the capacities of publicly supported agencies on the other. Effective public-private partnerships must be genuinely participative, as committed leaders coordinate their thinking, sharing objectives, sharing strategies, sharing resources, sharing predictions. And this approach can be powerful, indeed very powerful, in the social and cultural development fields, not only in the more established economic one….

[F]inally, I would mention what many call “Quality of Life Assessments”, a more adequate way to measure the results of our work. Quite simply, we need to embrace a wider array of evaluative criteria, both quantitative and qualitative, elements which the poor themselves take into account when assessing their own well-being. As we measure outcomes with greater breadth, we will move beyond an excessive reliance on traditional categories, such as average productivity levels, or per acre yields, or per capita national product, or rates of population growth. Yes, these are all significant variables, but they come alive only as they transform the quality of daily living for the populations involved in ways in which they, and their children, can see and value.

Official English version — Click here for the official French version

Honourable Minister,
Deputy Director-General,
Distinguished invitees,
Ladies and Gentlemen:

It is an honour to be here with you today and a great pleasure to greet the other patrons: the Agence Française de Développement, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Bank. Each has proved to be a highly valued partner of the Aga Khan Development Network. We are very grateful to them, and I express my heartfelt thanks for their invitation.

When preparing this speech, I thought I would tell you about generic difficult problems we encounter, such as the adequacy of financial development instruments to the needs of development projects. I am thinking for example of projects which cannot receive financing from the Bretton Woods institutions or other regional inter-governmental financing agencies, and cannot meet traditional commercial financing criteria nor bear their cost either. Other subjects are the lack of planning and coordination in many countries of Asia and Africa, where we are very active, and public-private sector consultation in the provision of education and health services.

As far as those who finance development are concerned, it is a strategic issue which must be resolved. There are numerous issues of this kind, and they will certainly feature in your discussions.

I thought that it would be helpful to give specific examples of situations the Aga Khan Development Network has encountered in the field, and then to ask you to consider the issues I am going to raise and to suggest solutions useful to us all.

I would like to mention major international financing principles here. For us, in the Aga Khan Development Network, the fundamental problem lies in translating funds into effective programmes, institutions and activities in the poorest countries in the world. We have to convert the principles followed by financiers in international financial organisations into action in the field. I realise that these issues may not fit easily into how your organisations categorise things, but please bear in mind that our approach reflects our experience in the field.

As you may know, the challenge of global development has been one of my central preoccupations over the last fifty years. In striving to understand the lives of widely dispersed Ismaili communities, I have also become immersed in the lives of their host societies. And I have been joined in that immersion by the institutions of the Aga Khan Development Network and our 60,000 employees, in more than 30 countries. Our experience, like yours, has been filled with both satisfactions and frustrations.

Over these fifty years, the world has made enormous, indeed breathtaking progress in many areas, but often where the needs are most urgent, our progress has been too slow. We have learned how to address particular symptoms of poverty, but unforeseen variables have diluted our impact. Perhaps most importantly, we have often failed to predict and to pre-empt tragic developments, such as famines and civil conflicts, even when they have been brewing over decades of despair.

The recent economic crisis has deepened such problems, adding to the urgency of our mission. Time is therefore more of the essence than ever before, and unless we can markedly accelerate our performance, our tasks will be further multiplied. Confronting these challenges, creatively and urgently, is nothing short of a moral imperative.

[H]ow do you translate international public will to support, into effective action in countries; the poorest countries of our world…. In fashioning our response, a heightened capacity for predicting risk and developing anticipatory responses will be critical. Predictability must become a key objective of our work; it is a science, which deserves far more attention from the development community.

So the issue comes back to how do you translate international public will to support, into effective action in countries; the poorest countries of our world. That is the problem we deal with every day in the Aga Khan Development Network. In fashioning our response, a heightened capacity for predicting risk and developing anticipatory responses will be critical. Predictability must become a key objective of our work; it is a science, which deserves far more attention from the development community.

I have no magical answers to offer. But I come to you this morning as one who has been watching and listening carefully in the developing world for a long time, and who has shared with my Network colleagues a point of view which we describe as looking “from the bottom up.” Our experience in the field has encouraged us to focus on the complexities and subtleties of development, to think as pragmatically and holistically as possible, and to develop responses which are punctual, targeted, and replicable.

I don’t mean to short-change the need for expanding financial resources and development. But a realistic assessment tells us that resource growth will be difficult, indeed we have learned recently, and regrettably, that government contributions have fallen short of the numbers that were pledged just five years ago. But even as we work to change that picture, we also have a special obligation to maximise the impact of whatever resources are at hand. And again, the question is: how do you do that in the field? In order to do that, the first question I have asked is whether the nature of the development process itself has changed over time. I believe that it has. Let me explain this view by citing five principles which have grown out of our development experience.

First, I would cite the rising importance of civil society; by which I mean those not-for profit organisations which are driven by a public service agenda. Increasingly, I believe, a cross section of civil society players can be major engines for progress in developing societies, particularly when governments are under-performing.

Secondly, I would underscore the growing potential of what some call PPP’s — public-private partnerships. Such collaborations can tap the unique strengths of both sectors, overcoming outmoded dogmas which depreciate the role of the market-driven enterprises on the one hand, or which denigrate the capacities of publicly supported agencies on the other. Effective public-private partnerships must be genuinely participative, as committed leaders coordinate their thinking, sharing objectives, sharing strategies, sharing resources, sharing predictions. And this approach can be powerful, indeed very powerful, in the social and cultural development fields, not only in the more established economic one.

A third guiding concept for our Network, as for others, is what we call Multi-Input Area Development…. Singular inputs alone will not do the job — not in the time available, not across the wide spectrum of needs.

A third guiding concept for our Network, as for others, is what we call Multi-Input Area Development. The acronym is horrible, it’s MIAD — but we use it a lot. Singular inputs alone will not do the job — not in the time available, not across the wide spectrum of needs. But if we can work simultaneously and synergistically on several fronts, then progress in one area will spur progress in other areas. The whole can be greater than the sum of its parts.

The fourth touchstone is the recognition that social diversity, the pluralism of peoples, is an asset, not a liability for the development process. Even as we address the complexities of development in one context, we must also differentiate more clearly among contexts. Impoverished peoples are more diversified than is sometimes appreciated. Some 70 percent of the world’s poor live in rural environments, where diversity — ethnic, religious, social, economic, linguistic, political — is like a kaleidoscope that history shakes every day. Often these local distinctions can provide valuable levers for long-term progress.

Fifth and finally, I would mention what many call “Quality of Life Assessments”, a more adequate way to measure the results of our work. Quite simply, we need to embrace a wider array of evaluative criteria, both quantitative and qualitative, elements which the poor themselves take into account when assessing their own well-being. As we measure outcomes with greater breadth, we will move beyond an excessive reliance on traditional categories, such as average productivity levels, or per acre yields, or per capita national product, or rates of population growth. Yes, these are all significant variables, but they come alive only as they transform the quality of daily living for the populations involved in ways in which they, and their children, can see and value.

This concern with quality assessments, of course, is not limited to the developing world. You may recall how President Sarkozy, speaking at the Sorbonne last September, described the inadequacies of traditional economic measurements. This view was echoed by the OECD — representing its 30 member countries — in calling for a new basket of quantitative and qualitative standards which reflect local conditions and local values.

[C]an we find new ways to fund the strengthening of civil society, to support broader public private partnerships, to encourage multi-input area development, to adapt to pluralistic human contexts, and to embrace a wider array of qualitative and quantitative measurements?

And so the question I would pose is this: can we find new ways to fund the strengthening of civil society, to support broader public private partnerships, to encourage multi-input area development, to adapt to pluralistic human contexts, and to embrace a wider array of qualitative and quantitative measurements?

Let me turn from the general to the specific. And here I will share with you examples of important initiatives being taken in various parts of the world which fall outside this traditional context of international funding and it is therefore a set of examples which I think will be useful for you as you discuss new methods of funding development.

One area of the world in which our work has been focused is in the high mountain regions of Central Asia. Badakhshan, for example, is a sensitive region in eastern Tajikistan and Afghanistan, where the same ethnic community is divided by a river which is also a national border, and where both groups live in extreme poverty. Here we are pursuing a coordinated programme involving water and land management, health and education, energy and transportation, micro-finance and telecommunications, culture and tourism. With inputs from many partners, and an emphasis on local choice, this effort touches the lives of a million people.

But having described this promising example let me ask how such initiatives might best be financed. If this programme works, could it be applied to the similarly divided Pashtun peoples, who live at the other end of Afghanistan and in neighbouring Pakistan? And is it not predictable that once the military have left that area, a new birth of civil society institutions will be required?

A second illustrative AKDN project in the same region is the new University of Central Asia. There are 25 million people who live in this high mountain environment, but there has been no specialised tertiary institution to educate them. And so a new independent, self-governing University of Central Asia was founded under an international agreement between the governments of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and myself. It will have campuses in all three countries. It will specialise in educating people for high mountain environments. But I ask again: how do we best mobilise resources for ventures like this, which span the public private divide, cross national frontiers, and address a fundamental educational vacuum?

In another part of the world, we have been involved for 25 years in a once-degraded neighbourhood amid the ruins of old Islamic Cairo. The creation there of the al-Azhar Park has been a powerful catalyst for urban renewal in the impoverished district of Darb al-Ahmar. This environmental and archaeological project has grown into a residential, recreational and cultural cityscape, attracting two million visitors a year and producing impressive, sustainable, and measurable economic growth.

Tens of thousands of the ultra-poor who live in this area live now with new hope for a better life. Using historic preservation as a linchpin for development is an eminently replicable approach. But here again, what are the funding instruments for development where culture is the driving force for change?

A fourth example comes from East Africa, where the Aga Khan University leads in establishing an East African Health System, a regional, not-for-profit, private sector initiative. Its focus is also multi-faceted: including community health services, secondary and tertiary referral hospitals, medical and nursing education, and state-of-the-art technologies. It will serve the populations of Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. But again, how does an effort which is essentially non-governmental, but which interfaces with five different governments, best find the funding it requires? Happily, I can begin to answer that question by citing the creative response which has been given to this initiative by the Agence Française de Développement.

Each of the cases I have cited today is singular. Each requires tailored financial instruments to succeed. They seem quasi-impossible to find. But it is here, in addressing new development challenges, that you and your colleagues can have a truly significant impact.

I wish you well. Thank you.

Official French version

Monsieur le Ministre,
Monsieur le Directeur Général adjoint,
Mesdames et Messieurs les hautes personnalités,
Mesdames et Messieurs,
Chers invités:

C’est un honneur de me trouver parmi vous aujourd’hui et un grand plaisir de saluer les autres mécènes : l’Agence française de développement, la Fondation Bill et Melinda Gates et la Banque mondiale. Chacune d’elles s’est montrée une partenaire précieuse du Réseau Aga Khan de développement. Nous sommes leurs obligés, et je les remercie d’autant plus de leur invitation.

En préparant cet exposé, j’ai pensé vous parler de difficiles problèmes, d’ordre générique, tel que de l’adéquation entre les outils de développement financiers et les besoins des projets de développement.

J’avais à l’esprit par exemple les projets qui ne peuvent bénéficier du financement des organisations de Bretton Woods ou d’autres agences de financement inter-gouvernementales régionales, et qui, par ailleurs, ne peuvent ni satisfaire aux critères des financements commerciaux traditionnels ni faire face à leur coût.

Un autre sujet aurait pu être l’absence de planification et de coordination dans de nombreux pays d’Asie et d’Afrique, où nous sommes très actifs, des consultations entre secteurs publics et privés dans le domaine des prestations en matière d’éducation et de santé.

Pour ceux qui financent le développement, il s’agit d’une question stratégique, qu’il est essentiel de résoudre. Il existe de nombreuses questions de ce type, mais elles viendront certainement dans vos discussions.

J’ai donc pensé qu’il serait utile d’être plus spécifique, en vous exposant quelques situations rencontrées sur le terrain par le Réseau Aga Khan de développement, puis en vous priant de prendre en considération les questions que je vais soulever, pour suggérer des réponses qui seront utiles à nous tous.

Je voudrais dire ici qu’il y a les grands principes de financement internationaux. Pour nous, dans le Réseau Aga Khan de développement, le problème de fond c’est de savoir comment ces ressources se traduisent par des programmes, des institutions, des activités performantes dans les pays les plus pauvres du monde. C’est donc la traduction entre les principes des financiers des organisations financières internationales et ce qui se passe sur le terrain.

Je réalise que ces questions ne trouveront peut-être pas facilement leur place dans la typologie de vos ateliers, et je vous demande de prendre en compte le fait que notre approche est le reflet même de notre expérience sur le terrain.

Comme vous le savez peut-être, le défi du développement à l’échelle mondiale constitue l’une de mes premières préoccupations depuis 50 ans. En cherchant à comprendre les divers modes de vie des communautés ismailies dispersées à travers le monde, je me suis également immergé dans la vie de leurs pays d’accueil. J’y ai été rejoint par les institutions du Réseau Aga Khan de développement et par ses 60 000 employés, dans plus de 30 pays. Notre expérience, comme la vôtre, a connu des satisfactions et des frustrations.

Au cours de ces cinquante années, le monde a réalisé d’énormes progrès, des progrès époustouflants dirais-je même, dans de nombreux domaines. Pourtant, bien souvent, là où les besoins se font le plus ressentir, notre évolution a été trop lente. Nous avons appris à appréhender certains symptômes de la pauvreté, mais des éléments imprévus ont dilué notre impact. Peut-être, surtout, n’avons-nous pas su prédire et anticiper certaines tragédies, telles que des famines et des guerres civiles, que des décennies de désespoir avaient pourtant couvées.

La récente crise économique a aggravé ces problèmes, et par-là même renforcé l’urgence de notre mission. Plus que jamais, le temps est compté, et à moins que nous ne parvenions à accélérer sensiblement notre performance, nos tâches se verront multipliées. Faire face à ces défis de manière créative et urgente constitue désormais un impératif moral.

Surgit donc à nouveau la question de savoir comment traduire la volonté publique internationale de soutien en une action efficace sur le terrain, dans les pays les plus pauvres du monde. Tel est le problème auquel doit faire face au quotidien le Réseau Aga Khan de développement.

Pour y répondre, il sera essentiel d’accroître notre capacité à prévoir les risques et à développer des solutions pour les anticiper. La prévisibilité doit devenir un objectif central de nos activités ; c’est une science qui mérite que la communauté du développement s’y attarde.

Je n’ai pas de solutions magiques à proposer. Mais je me présente devant vous ce matin comme quelqu’un qui observe et écoute avec attention et depuis longtemps le monde du développement, et qui partage avec mes collègues du Réseau un point de vue consistant à regarder « de bas en haut ». Notre expérience du terrain nous a encouragés à mettre l’accent sur les complexités et les subtilités du développement, à penser de façon aussi pragmatique et holistique que possible, et à élaborer des réponses ponctuelles, ciblées et reproductibles.

Je ne cherche pas à nier la nécessité d’étendre les ressources financières et le développement. La réalité nous indique cependant qu’augmenter les ressources s’avérera délicat, comme l’atteste l’annonce récente et regrettable que les contributions gouvernementales sont loin d’atteindre les promesses d’il y a cinq ans à peine.

Mais tandis que nous travaillons à changer cet état de fait, nous avons également l’indéniable obligation de maximiser l’impact des ressources actuellement disponibles. Et là encore, la question est : comment cela se traduit-il sur le terrain ? Pour y parvenir, ma première question a été de savoir si la nature même du processus de développement a changé au cours du temps. Je pense que c’est le cas. Laissez-moi illustrer ceci par cinq principes nés de notre pratique du développement.

Premièrement, j’aimerais citer le rôle croissant de la société civile, terme par lequel j’entends les organisations à but non lucratif œuvrant pour le bien public. De plus en plus, me semble-t-il, une partie des membres de la société civile peut à elle seule constituer un moteur de progrès pour des sociétés en développement, particulièrement là où les gouvernements n’obtiennent pas de résultats probants.

Deuxièmement, je soulignerais le potentiel croissant de ce que certains appellent les « PPP », ou partenariats public-privé. Ce type de collaboration, qui exploite les forces propres à chacun des deux secteurs, sonne le glas des dogmes surannés qui consistent d’une part à déprécier le rôle des entreprises commerciales, et d’autre part à dénigrer les capacités des agences publiques. Un partenariat public-privé efficace se doit d’être véritablement participatif, les leaders de chaque secteur s’engageant à coordonner leur réflexion et à mettre en commun des objectifs, des stratégies, des ressources et des prévisions. Cette approche peut s’avérer efficace, très efficace même, dans les domaines du développement social et culturel notamment, et pas seulement dans le domaine plus établi du développement économique.

Un troisième principe directeur pour notre Réseau, ainsi que pour les autres, est ce que nous appelons le développement multi-secteurs (Multi-Input Area Development). L’acronyme en anglais, MIAD, est disgracieux, mais nous l’utilisons beaucoup. Des actions individuelles ne peuvent venir à bout du problème, pas dans le temps qui est imparti, et pas sur une échelle aussi étendue de besoins. Mais si nous pouvons travailler simultanément, en synergie sur plusieurs fronts, alors les progrès réalisés dans un domaine inciteront les progrès dans d’autres domaines. En d’autres termes, « l’ensemble vaut plus que la somme des éléments qui le composent ».

Le quatrième concept est de reconnaître que la diversité sociale et le pluralisme des peuples sont des atouts, et non des handicaps, pour le processus de développement. Tout en touchant aux complexités du développement dans un contexte donné, nous ne devons pas oublier de différencier plus clairement les multiples contextes qu’il regroupe. Les populations appauvries sont souvent plus diversifiées qu’on ne le croit. Environ 70 pour cent des pauvres de ce monde vivent dans des milieux ruraux où la diversité — ethnique, religieuse, sociale, économique, linguistique, politique – forme un véritable kaléidoscope que l’Histoire agite chaque jour. Ces distinctions locales constituent souvent de précieux outils pour une évolution à long terme.

Enfin, cinquièmement, j’aimerais mentionner ce que beaucoup appellent les « Evaluations de la qualité de vie », soit une manière plus adéquate de mesurer les résultats de notre travail. C’est-à-dire, très simplement, qu’il nous faut adopter un arsenal plus étendu de critères d’évaluation, à la fois quantitatifs et qualitatifs, critères auxquels recourent les pauvres eux-mêmes lorsqu’ils évaluent leur propre bien-être.

Mesurer ainsi les résultats de manière plus large nous permettra de dépasser notre dépendance excessive aux catégories traditionnelles que sont la productivité moyenne, le rendement par hectare, le produit national par habitant ou encore le taux de croissance de la population. Il s’agit certes de variables importantes, mais qui ne prennent vie qu’à partir de l’instant où elles transforment la qualité de vie quotidienne des populations concernées d’une façon qu’elles et leurs enfants peuvent voir et apprécier.
Cette notion d’évaluation de la qualité, bien entendu, n’est pas réservée au monde en développement. Peut-être vous souvenez-vous du discours du président Sarkozy à La Sorbonne en septembre dernier, dans lequel il évoquait l’inadéquation des outils de mesure économique traditionnels. Cette perception a été reprise par l’OCDE — et les 30 pays membres qu’elle représente – qui a réclamé un nouvel arsenal de normes quantitatives et qualitatives reflétant les conditions et les valeurs locales.

Je poserai donc la question suivante : pouvons-nous trouver de nouveaux moyens de financer le renforcement de la société civile, de soutenir des partenariats public-privé plus importants, d’encourager le développement multi-secteurs, de nous adapter à des contextes humains pluralistes, et d’adopter une gamme plus étendue d’outils de mesure qualitative et quantitative ?

Laissez-moi à présent passer du général au spécifique. J’aimerais partager avec vous des exemples d’initiatives importantes prises dans diverses régions du monde, qui n’entrent pas dans le contexte traditionnel du financement international. Je pense que ces exemples seront par conséquent utiles à votre réflexion sur de nouvelles méthodes de financement du développement.

L’une des régions dans lesquelles nous avons concentré nos activités est la région des hautes montagnes d’Asie centrale. Le Badakhshan, par exemple, zone sensible de l’Est du Tadjikistan et de l’Afghanistan, abrite un groupe ethnique divisé par une rivière qui sert également de frontière. Les deux sections de la communauté vivent dans un état de pauvreté extrême. Nous menons dans cette région un programme coordonnant parallèlement la gestion de l’eau et des terres, la santé et l’éducation, l’énergie et le transport, la micro-finance et les télécommunications, la culture et le tourisme. Grâce à l’intervention de nombreux partenaires, et en insistant sur les choix locaux, ce programme touche la vie d’un million de personnes.

Après avoir décrit cet exemple prometteur, laissez-moi vous demander quelles méthodes de financement bénéficieraient le mieux à de telles initiatives. Si ce programme s’avère fructueux, pourrait-il être appliqué aux populations pachtounes, elles aussi divisées à l’autre bout de l’Afghanistan et au Pakistan voisin ? N’est-il pas à prévoir qu’après le départ des militaires de la région, un renouveau des institutions civiles sera nécessaire ?

Un autre exemple de projet du Réseau Aga Khan de développement dans la même région est la nouvelle Université d’Asie centrale. Vingt cinq millions de personnes vivent dans cet environnement montagneux, et pourtant, jusqu’à présent, il n’existait aucune institution tertiaire d’éducation spécialisée. Une nouvelle université indépendante et autonome, a donc été fondée, l’Université d’Asie centrale, grâce à un accord international entre les gouvernements du Kazakhstan, du Kirghizistan, du Tadjikistan et moi-même. Cette université, dont les campus seront répartis sur les trois pays, sera spécialisée dans l’enseignement des populations des régions de haute montagne. Je vous repose donc la question : comment faire en sorte de mobiliser au mieux les ressources nécessaires à une telle entreprise, qui englobe les sphères publique et privée, franchit les frontières territoriales et répond à un vide fondamental en termes d’éducation ?

Dans une autre région du monde, nous avons œuvré pendant 25 ans à la transformation d’un quartier autrefois délabré au cœur des ruines du vieux Caire islamique, où la création du parc Al-Azhar a participé à la régénération urbaine du quartier pauvre de Darb al-Ahmar. Ce projet environnemental et archéologique s’est transformé en un havre résidentiel, récréatif et culturel attirant deux millions de visiteurs par an et générant une croissance économique conséquente, durable et mesurable.

Désormais, les dizaines de milliers de gens qui habitent en ces lieux dans une pauvreté extrême peuvent espérer une amélioration de leurs conditions de vie. La conservation historique comme levier du développement est une approche qui mérite d’être répétée. Mais ici encore, à quels outils de financement le développement peut-il prétendre, lorsque que c’est la culture qui sert d’impulsion au changement ?

Je citerai un quatrième exemple venu d’Afrique de l’Est, où l’Université Aga Khan fait figure de pionnière dans l’établissement d’un système de santé régional, au sein d’une initiative locale, non lucrative et privée. Là encore, il s’agit d’un projet qui agira à plusieurs niveaux — services de santé communautaires, hôpitaux de deuxième niveau et hôpitaux de référence de troisième niveau, enseignement médical et écoles d’infirmières, et technologies de pointe. Il desservira les populations du Kenya, de la Tanzanie, de l’Ouganda, du Rwanda et du Burundi. Cependant, là encore, comment une initiative par nature non gouvernementale, mais qui coopère avec cinq gouvernements différents, peut-elle trouver le financement qui lui correspond ? Par bonheur, je dispose désormais de quelques éléments de réponse, grâce à la solution créative apportée à cette initiative par l’Agence française de développement.

Chacun des exemples que j’ai cités aujourd’hui est particulier. Chacun, pour réussir, requiert des outils financiers appropriés qui semblent quasiment impossibles à trouver.

Mais c’est en abordant les nouveaux défis du développement, que vous et vos collègues serez à même d’avoir un réel impact.

Je vous souhaite bonne chance et vous remercie.

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)