The goal [of AKDN’s strategy] is clear: the aim is to create or strengthen civil society in developing countries. This single goal, when it is achieved, is in fact necessary and sufficient to ensure peaceful and stable development over the long term, even when governance is problematic…. The essence of our development strategy is thus to create these where they are lacking or need to be reinforced….

The various organisations within the AKDN fall into two categories which both share the same goal of supporting development: commercial companies (grouped together into the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development, known as AKFED) and those non-profit enterprises which I call “para-companies,” that work toward social or cultural goals. The reason for this dual structure is that civil society cannot emerge solely by starting businesses or solely by building hospitals, schools and universities or cultural facilities….

Para-companies are designed to be economically independent…. [They are] conceived to produce a surplus to ensure their survival and development as long as an entrepreneurial philosophy underpins the creation process and later the day-to-day management. This notion of surplus, it should be pointed out, in no way conflicts with the non-profit status of para-companies.

Official English version — Click here for the official French version

Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim.

The First President,
Minister,
Your Excellencies,
Your Excellency, the Rector,
Commissioner for diversity and equal opportunities,
Distinguished representatives of the President’s office, the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, the Ministry of the Interior and Paris Town Hall,
Distinguished guests,
Chairman of the Board of M6,
Editor in Chief and Associate Director of the Nouvel Economiste,
Ladies and Gentlemen:

I shall begin by saying how honoured I am to be given the Nouvel Economiste Philanthropic Entrepreneur of the Year 2009 Award in this splendid setting, the Palais Cambon.

I particularly wish to thank Madame Tchakaloff, for her very kind words, as well as the entire editorial team under the leadership of Monsieur Nijdam, for having singled me out. I would also like to thank the sponsor of this ceremony, and here, I turn to you, Mr. First President, our gracious host. And of course I also wish to greet the Finance Minister, who is on a trip to Lebanon and Syria and sends us warm greetings through Madame Cotta. Thank you.

I also turn to His Excellency Rector Dali Boubakeur, whom I am delighted to see here, and who, at particular moments of my life in France, has honoured me with his friendship and advice. I also pay tribute through him to the Great Mosque of Paris, which my family and I look upon with great friendship and respect, and express my gratitude for everything he has done for Muslims in France.

Allow me to move straight on to the subject of this speech, which is to share with you the experience gained over the past five decades during which the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) has been built up. I shall focus my talk on the strategy we implement, which will enable me to outline the notion of philanthropic enterprise.

First, a few figures: The AKDN Foundation is an umbrella organisation which coordinates the activities of over 200 agencies and institutions that make up the network, employing a total of 70,000 paid staff and 100,000 volunteers. The network operates in 35 of the poorest countries in the world and is statutorily secular. This tableau is of course merely a momentary snapshot of a constantly evolving process, but its contours are clearly defined enough today for us to speak about goals, strategy and method.

The goal is clear: The aim is to create or strengthen civil society in developing countries. This single goal, when it is achieved, is in fact necessary and sufficient to ensure peaceful and stable development over the long term, even when governance is problematic.

As regards the strategy, civil society obviously cannot exist without apolitical and secular civil institutions, in particular social, cultural and economic ones. The essence of our development strategy is thus to create these where they are lacking or need to be reinforced.

[Implementing AKDN’s strategy] first involves answering the question as to whether it is the right moment to create the institution and, in the affirmative, to bring together the human and financial resources to get it off the ground.

Lastly, the method: It first involves answering the question as to whether it is the right moment to create the institution and, in the affirmative, to bring together the human and financial resources to get it off the ground.

The various organisations within the AKDN fall into two categories which both share the same goal of supporting development: commercial companies (grouped together into the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development, known as AKFED) and those non-profit enterprises which I call “para-companies,” that work toward social or cultural goals. The reason for this dual structure is that civil society cannot emerge solely by starting businesses or solely by building hospitals, schools and universities or cultural facilities.

It is the architecture of this dual company/para-company structure that I would now like to present. I will start by saying that the two abide by a set of common rules.

Among [the best] practices I might point out one that is particularly difficult to achieve, and that is: the ability to withstand a crisis.

First of all, they must implement current best management practices in their respective areas of competence and keep up-to-date in this regard. Among these practices I might point out one that is particularly difficult to achieve, and that is: the ability to withstand a crisis. Another common rule is, they must be designed in such a way as to have measurable benefits for the local population, the general target being the very poor, and among them, rural communities.

I should also like to point out this rule: projects located in countries emerging from domestic or international conflict, or undergoing a change in their economic fundamentals, should not be dismissed, but should on the contrary often even be sought out. It is indeed in such circumstances that the poorest populations need the most attention.

All this requires very special skills and long-term AKDN involvement, if only to ensure that the managerial culture becomes strong enough for “best practice” reflexes to truly take hold.

And now, turning to AKFED commercial enterprises, we’re talking about approximately 150 companies in some 15 countries. They employ over 30,000 people and generate a turnover of two billion dollars.

They indirectly provide a living for millions of people, in particular in the agribusiness sector. To give you an example, AKFED developed green bean farming in Kenya by providing 50,000 farmers with technical assistance and buying their produce for export to Europe. The company has 2,000 employees, turns a profit and indirectly provides a living for 500,000 people.

Specific rules govern AKFED companies…. The first is that AKDN investments earmarked for AKFED projects should in most cases be made in the form of long-term equity participation. This is to avoid the risk of excessive debt. The second is that AKFED’s share of profits must be entirely reinvested in the group’s projects.

Specific rules govern AKFED companies. I will discuss two of the essential ones. The first is that AKDN investments earmarked for AKFED projects should in most cases be made in the form of long-term equity participation. This is to avoid the risk of excessive debt. The second is that AKFED’s share of profits must be entirely reinvested in the group’s projects. This is a fundamental feature of AKFED projects, the rule being that any return on investment should solely benefit the population of the country where it has been made.

Commercial activity alone is not enough to create or strengthen civil society. It also takes para-companies. These are in fact so essential that AKDN commits four times more resources to them as to the profit-making sector.

Para-companies are designed to be economically independent. An urban and rural network of schools such as the one we manage in Pakistan, a university hospital such as the Aga Khan hospital in Nairobi and a park such as al-Azhar in Cairo, thus can be perfectly well conceived to produce a surplus to ensure their survival and development as long as an entrepreneurial philosophy underpins the creation process and later the day-to-day management. This notion of surplus, it should be pointed out, in no way conflicts with the non-profit status of para-companies.

One condition in order for a para-company to attain financial independence is that its start-up cost must be covered by an outright gift …

In any event, one condition in order for a para-company to attain financial independence is that its start-up cost must be covered by an outright gift from the AKDN, supplemented in some cases from partner donations, usually from national or international financial development institutions.

I do not wish to go over the allotted time, but I would like to conclude by emphasising that an important function of the network’s umbrella organisation, the AKDN Foundation, is to work closely with the governments of the countries with which we cooperate. With France, this work is particularly intense, and I’m happy to report that in 2008, the French Delegation of the AKDN Foundation, the largest of all, signed a cooperation agreement with the French state and the French Development Agency to assist 23 developing countries, involving all the AKDN’s areas of activity.

This brief presentation of AKDN companies and para-companies should not give the impression that the work of each is entirely separate from the other. On the contrary, both being part of the AKDN, the two types of organisations are able to offer each other mutual support. For instance, a commercial or industrial AKFED company can set up endowment funds to subsidise access for the poor to top-quality medical services or to help one of the network’s micro-finance banks. In return, through their enormous contribution to building civil society, para-companies create a space conducive to the development of AKFED companies.

Of course, the major principles guiding the AKDN are difficult to implement, and we have met with occasional disappointment. We have had enough successful achievements, however, to convince us to stay the course.

In other words, development works!

I am pleased to have had this opportunity to explain to you how, on the basis of a few fairly simple but fairly uncommon principles, we have tried to relieve hardship in the world and to help create peaceful, enlightened civil societies that are proud of their culture.

Lastly, and I say this tongue in cheek, I hope I have convinced you that I am neither a typical entrepreneur nor an ordinary philanthropist, and therefore may not deserve this award.

Thank you.

Official French version

Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim.

Monsieur le Premier Président,
Monsieur le Député,
Mesdames et messieurs les Ambassadeurs,
Monsieur le Recteur,
Monsieur le Commissaire à la diversité et à l’égalité des chances,
Mesdames et messieurs les Hauts représentants de la Présidence de la République, du Ministère des affaires
étrangères et européennes, du Ministère de l’intérieur et de la Mairie de Paris,
Mesdames et messieurs les Hautes personnalités,
Monsieur le Président du directoire de M6,
Monsieur le Rédacteur en chef Madame la Directrice déléguée,
Mesdames, Messieurs:

Mes premiers mots seront pour vous dire combien je me sens honoré de recevoir le prix Nouvel Economiste de l’entrepreneur philanthropique de l’année 2009, dans ce magnifique Palais Cambon.

Je remercie tout particulièrement Madame Tchakaloff, pour ses mots très aimables, ainsi que toute l’équipe de rédaction dirigée par Monsieur Nijdam, pour avoir porté leur choix sur mon nom. Tous mes remerciements vont aussi au parrain de cette cérémonie, et je me tourne ici vers vous Monsieur le Premier Président, qui nous faites le plaisir de nous recevoir chez vous. Je salue naturellement aussi Madame la Ministre des finances, qui durant son voyage au Liban et en Syrie nous adresse par la voix de Madame Cotta un message si chaleureux. Merci.

Je me tourne aussi vers Son Excellence le Recteur Dalil Boubakeur, que je suis heureux de retrouver et qui, à des moments particuliers de ma vie en France, m’a apporté fraternité et conseils. Je salue aussi en lui la Grande Mosquée de Paris, que ma famille et moi considérons avec la plus grande amitié et le plus grand respect, et je lui exprime ma reconnaissance pour tout ce qu’il a fait pour les musulmans de France.

Permettez que j’en vienne directement à mon propos, qui est de vous faire partager l’expérience acquise au fil des cinq décennies qui viennent de s’écouler, au cours desquelles le Réseau Aga Khan pour le développement a été construit (j’utiliserai l’acronyme anglais — excusez-moi -‘AKDN’ pour le désigner).

Je centrerai mon exposé sur la stratégie que nous mettons en œuvre, ce qui me permettra de cerner la notion d’entreprise philanthropique.

Quelques chiffres d’abord:

– la Fondation AKDN, entité faîtière, coordonne les activités des plus de 200 organismes et institutions qui composent le réseau, au sein desquelles 70.000 salariés et 100.000 bénévoles agissent quotidiennement ;

– par ailleurs, le réseau intervient dans 35 pays parmi les plus pauvres du monde, dans un cadre statutairement laïque.

Cette photographie n’est bien sûr qu’un moment dans une dynamique, mais ses contours sont aujourd’hui suffisamment précis pour que l’on puisse parler d’objectif, de stratégie et de méthode.

L’objectif est clair : il s’agit de créer ou de renforcer la société civile dans les pays en voie de développement. Cet objectif unique, lorsqu’il est atteint, est en effet nécessaire et suffisant pour assurer un développement serein et stable dans la longue durée, même quand la gouvernance est problématique.

Quant à la stratégie, il est évident qu’une société civile ne peut exister en l’absence d’institutions civiles apolitiques et laïques, en particulier des institutions sociales, culturelles et économiques. L’essence de la stratégie du développement est donc de les créer là où elles sont absentes ou doivent grandir.

Enfin, la méthode. Elle consiste en premier lieu à valider la question de savoir s’il est opportun de créer l’institution, puis, si la réponse est positive, rassembler les moyens humains et financiers nécessaires pour la créer.

Au sein d’AKDN, il existe deux catégories d’organisations qui ont en commun l’objectif de soutenir le développement : celles qui ont un but lucratif (rassemblées au sein du Fonds Aga Khan pour le développement, connu sous le nom d’AKFED), et celles que j’appellerai ‘para-entreprises’, sans but lucratif, dont l’objet est social ou culturel.

La raison de cette dualité est qu’une société civile ne peut naître uniquement de la création d’entreprises ou seulement de la création d’hôpitaux, d’écoles ou d’universités, ou encore de lieux de culture.

C’est cette dualité entre entreprise et para-entreprise que je vous présenterai.

Tout d’abord je vous dirai que les deux obéissent à certaines règles communes.

En premier lieu, elles doivent mettre en œuvre les meilleures pratiques de gestion du moment dans leurs domaines respectifs de compétence et rester à jour en la matière.

Parmi ces pratiques on peut en noter une, particulièrement difficile à acquérir, à savoir la capacité à résister aux crises.

Une autre règle commune est qu’elles doivent être conçues pour avoir des effets bénéfiques mesurables sur les populations concernées, l’objectif étant en général les populations les plus pauvres et, parmi elles, les ruraux.

Egalement, je noterai la règle selon laquelle il faut non seulement ne pas écarter mais souvent même rechercher des projets localisés dans des pays qui sortent de conflits internes ou internationaux, ou encore qui se trouvent dans un processus de modification de leurs fondamentaux économiques. En effet, c’est dans ces circonstances que les populations les plus pauvres requièrent le plus d’attention.

Tout ceci demande des compétences très particulières et une implication d’AKDN sur le très long terme, ne serait-ce que pour s’assurer que la culture managériale est devenue assez forte pour que les réflexes de ‘meilleures pratiques’ s’ancrent vraiment.

Pour parler maintenant des entreprises d’AKFED, celles qui sont à but lucratif, il s’agit d’environ 150 entreprises réparties dans une quinzaine de pays. Elles emploient plus de 30.000 personnes et génèrent deux milliards de dollars de chiffre d’affaires.

Elles font vivre indirectement des millions de personnes, en particulier dans le secteur agro-industriel. Pour donner un exemple, AKFED a développé la culture du haricot vert au Kenya en fournissant à 50.000 paysans une assistance technique et en leur achetant leur production pour l’exporter en Europe. L’entreprise emploie 2.000 salariés, est rentable et fait vivre indirectement 500.000 personnes.

Les entreprises AKFED obéissent à des règles spécifiques. Je voudrais en évoquer deux, qui sont essentielles.

La première est que les investissements AKDN dédiés aux projets AKFED doivent, dans la généralité des cas, prendre la forme de participations en capital à très long terme. Nous voulons en effet éviter les risques d’endettement excessif.

La seconde est que la part d’AKFED dans les bénéfices doit être totalement réinvestie dans les projets du groupe. Il s’agit là d’une caractéristique fondamentale des projets AKFED, la règle étant que les retours sur investissement doivent bénéficier aux populations des pays concernés et à elles seules.

Ces actions dans le domaine de l’économie productive ne suffisent pas pour créer ou renforcer la société civile. Il y faut les para-entreprises, qui sont essentielles au point que l’AKDN engage quatre fois plus de ressources dans ce secteur que dans le secteur à but lucratif.

Les para-entreprises sont conçues pour être économiquement autonomes. Un réseau urbain et rural d’une centaine d’écoles, comme celui que nous gérons au Pakistan, un hôpital universitaire comme l’hôpital Aga Khan à Nairobi et un parc comme celui de Al-Azhar au Caire, peuvent ainsi parfaitement être conçus de manière à créer des surplus pour assurer leur survie et leur développement, dès lors qu’une réflexion entrepreneuriale sous-tend le processus de création puis de la gestion courante. Cette notion de surplus, il faut le noter, n’est en rien contraire au statut sans but lucratif des para-entreprises.

Quoi qu’il en soit, une des conditions pour qu’une para-entreprise parvienne à l’autonomie économique est que son coût de création soit couvert par un don définitif d’AKDN et, le cas échéant, de ses partenaires, en général des institutions financières de développement, nationales ou internationales.

Je souhaite ne pas excéder le temps qui m’est imparti mais je voudrais terminer en soulignant que l’une des fonctions importantes qui est assignée à l’organisation faîtière du réseau, la Fondation AKDN, est de travailler de façon rapprochée avec les Gouvernements des pays avec lesquels nous coopérons.

Ce travail est particulièrement intense avec la France et je suis heureux de vous dire que la Délégation française de la Fondation AKDN, la plus importante de toutes, a signé en 2008 avec la République française et l’Agence française de développement une Convention de coopération en faveur de 23 pays en développement, dans tous les domaines d’activité de l’AKDN.

Cette très brève présentation successive des entreprises et des para-entreprises ne doit pas conduire à la conclusion que les deux ne s’interpénètrent pas. Au contraire, leur appartenance commune à AKDN permet aux deux systèmes de s’épauler mutuellement.

C’est ainsi qu’une entreprise commerciale ou industrielle d’AKFED peut créer des fonds de dotation, par exemple pour subventionner l’accès de populations pauvres à des services médicaux de haut niveau ou encore pour aider une des banques de micro-finance du réseau.

Les para-entreprises en contrepartie créent un terrain favorable au développement des entreprises AKFED, en contribuant massivement à la construction de la société civile.

Bien sûr les grands principes d’AKDN sont difficiles à mettre en œuvre et nous avons subi des déconvenues. Les réussites sont cependant suffisamment nombreuses pour nous convaincre de conserver le cap.

Pour dire les choses autrement : le développement, ça marche !

Je suis très heureux de vous montrer comment, sur la base de quelques principes finalement assez simples mais atypiques, nous essayons de réduire le malheur dans le monde et de participer à la création de sociétés civiles pacifiques, éclairées et fières de leurs cultures.

Enfin, et c’est un clin d’œil, j’espère vous avoir convaincu que je ne suis pas un entrepreneur au sens classique, ni un philanthrope au sens traditionnel, et que, dès lors, je ne méritais peut-être pas ce prix.

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)