In a world that claims to be globalised, there are some who might regard cultural standardisation as natural, even desirable. For my part, I believe that marks of individual and group cultural identity generate an inner strength which is conducive to peaceful relations. I also believe in the power of plurality, without which there is no possibility of exchange. In my view, this idea is integral to the very definition of genuine quality of life….

I want to talk to you today about my efforts to defend these cultures, through the Aga Khan Development Network, and specifically through its dedicated agency, the Aga Khan Trust for Culture. [The Trust’s activities] obey three key principles:

  • to increase the beneficiaries’ independence,
  • to involve local communities, and
  • to secure the support of public and private partners.

Official English version — Click here for the official French version

Minister of Culture and Communication,
European Commissioner for the Information Society and the Media,
Ministers,
Representatives of the European Union,
Representatives of international organisations and institutions,
Representatives of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Region and the Département of Vaucluse,
Your worship, the Deputy Mayoress of Avignon,
Representatives from the world of culture and economy,
Ladies and Gentlemen:

Mr. President of the Republic and you, Madam Minister, I’m honoured and delighted to have been invited to say a few words at this Avignon Forum.

You have asked me to talk a little about my experience of a subject that you know is very dear to my heart: “The value and importance of cultural diversity and its role in promoting peace and development”

In fact, exactly fifty years ago, when I inherited the Imamat from grandfather, I discovered that wars, indifference, negligence and the drive to standardise cultures through colonisation, or the desire to modernise the built environment, had resulted in the irreparable loss of important cultural characteristics in developing countries, particularly those in Muslim countries. In other words, the distinctive cultural features of those countries, whose key importance is stressed by UNESCO’s definition, were being eroded. Something had to be done.

I want to talk to you today about my efforts to defend these cultures, through the Aga Khan Development Network, and specifically through its dedicated agency, the Aga Khan Trust for Culture. This Trust for Culture focuses its activities in three main areas:

  • the Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme,
  • the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, and
  • an Education and Culture Programme.

These activities, which are themselves subdivided into a variety of subsidiary programmes in many countries, obey three key principles:

  • to increase the beneficiaries’ independence,
  • to involve local communities, and
  • to secure the support of public and private partners.

I thought it would be best, in the allotted time, to give you three examples of projects carried out within the framework of this institution, so they might serve as a useful point of reference for the discussions that will take place in this Forum over the next few days.

All our programmes have three aspects in common:

  • they are carried out in a poor environment where there are considerable centrifugal, sometimes even conflicting, forces at play;
  • they are designed to have maximum beneficial impact on the economies of the populations involved and their quality of life in the broadest sense of the term;
  • they are planned in the long term, over a period of up to twenty-five years, enabling them to become self-sufficient both financially as well as in terms of human resources.

That said, the first example I shall talk about is a programme being run in the field of intellectual works, namely music.

Not only were [the musical cultures of Central Asia] being consigned to oblivion, but musical models imposed on them from outside, often with ulterior political motives, were creating a colourless cultural uniformity.

I should like you to consider the complex history, diversity and inventiveness of the music of countries like Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan or Afghanistan. Sadly I discovered that the musical cultures of Central Asia were struggling for the reasons I gave a moment ago. Not only were they being consigned to oblivion, but the musical models imposed on them from outside, often with ulterior political motives, were creating a colourless cultural uniformity. These processes have resulted in a loss of identity, not only in the field of music discussed here, but also in many others.

In a world that claims to be globalised, there are some who might regard cultural standardisation as natural, even desirable. For my part, I believe that marks of individual and group cultural identity generate an inner strength which is conducive to peaceful relations. I also believe in the power of plurality, without which there is no possibility of exchange. In my view, this idea is integral to the very definition of genuine quality of life.

With regard to the example of music used here, through the Trust we met the challenge by creating the Aga Khan Music Initiative. We called this project the “Silk Road”, since all the countries concerned were situated along that unique route linking China and Europe.

The long-term objective is:

  • to boost education and research;
  • to train new generations of young artists;
  • to contribute to the revival of festivals, concerts and performances in the countries from which the music originated;
  • to bring the music to audiences not only in neighbouring countries, but also in other Muslim countries and the West.

[T]he great advantage of this type of programme is that it not only promotes cultural pluralism, but also underscores the legitimate function of pluralism as a principle of social organisation, which may be harder to comprehend.

We are now witnessing a true musical revival in these faraway countries. Furthermore, the great advantage of this type of programme is that it not only promotes cultural pluralism, but also underscores the legitimate function of pluralism as a principle of social organisation, which may be harder to comprehend. Although this result cannot be measured with the tools of an economist, it unfailingly contributes every time to a renewed awareness of specific cultural characteristics and a considerable improvement in the quality of life. This is no doubt the reason why, when a community has witnessed and participated in an experiment to promote pluralism, it is eager to see it applied in other areas.

Equally important as the rediscovery and worldwide circulation of traditional music, is that young architects should be able to draw inspiration freely from all traditions, starting with their own, and this is my second example. Architects in the East should have access to the best sources in the West and vice versa. It was with this aim in view that the Aga Khan Trust for Culture created ARCHNET, basing it at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to ensure its future growth as technology progresses. Once again this is an intellectual work — an on-line forum, and an electronic encyclopaedia of the built environment.

[A]lthough there is no question of dismissing the technical contributions of modernity, they must be assimilated into their intended socio-cultural context.

This tool allows architects from developing countries in particular to gain access to knowledge and techniques so that they can construct buildings for which there is no precedent in their history, such as airports, hospitals or modern office blocks, without precluding the integration of elements from their own culture. In other words, although there is no question of dismissing the technical contributions of modernity, they must be assimilated into their intended socio-cultural context.

Our objective, when we created ARCHNET, which has now been achieved, was to create a global community of architects, town planners, teachers and students sharing their knowledge on-line, in the field of the built environment. According to the most recent figures, this community now has over 60,000 members. By October, the number of “hits” on the website and web pages visited was 30% up on last year.

My third example is the restoration by the Aga Khan Trust of historic cities and their parks. We have done work in this field in Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Bosnia Herzegovina, Egypt, Syria, India, Pakistan, Kenya, Zanzibar and Mali. We have therefore helped breathe new life into rural and urban economies by revitalising the historic sites and buildings that form the living environment for people who are among the poorest inhabitants of the countries concerned.

In this context, it is only right to mention the incredible impetus provided by public-private partnerships. I’ll quote here Dr. Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister of India in 2004, who said:

I hope that more public-private partnerships can be evolved to maintain and restore the monuments of our ancestors, which often lie in a neglected condition in our cities and towns.

I must say that I was particularly delighted to hear him make this statement at Emperor Humayun’s Mausoleum, near Delhi, which was restored as the result of an effective partnership between the Indian state and the Aga Khan Trust for Culture.

We have learned how effective and valuable public-private partnerships can be. This is exactly the lesson I have put into practice for the restoration of the Chantilly estate …

We have learned how effective and valuable public-private partnerships can be. This is exactly the lesson I have put into practice for the restoration of the Chantilly estate, a programme that I am personally running in conjunction with the Institut de France, the town of Chantilly, the Département de l’Oise, the Picardy Region and France-Galop.

The impact of these particular examples can be measured with traditional economic tools, such as the effect on a given demography and the quantifiable improvement in quality of life parameters. This leads me to hope, for the first time, that this type of activity can be financed by the large international financial agencies, without our running the risk of being called financial carnivores.

So my experience concurs with what the Minister was saying earlier: “Culture isn’t a world apart, it lies within an all too real economic context.”

Finally, I should like to put into different words something I have already said indirectly: I am very concerned about the gulf between cultures. However, this gulf is not what has mistakenly been called the clash of civilisations. This gulf is potentially just as dangerous as a clash, because ignorance about other people and a lack of understanding of the valuable benefits of plurality can lead to contempt, hatred and war. A gulf however can be filled in, whereas a clash is irreparable.

We are all profoundly aware of this gulf and this is fundamentally why we take action. I have given you several examples, but there are many others, like the Aga Khan Museum which is to be built in Toronto to become the specialist centre for Islamic art in North America and initiate exchanges with all the leading museums in the West.

I sincerely hope that these partnerships will be able to develop with governments, international organisations and their development agencies. They have supported and helped us greatly in the past and I’m sure that this tool will provide new ways for them to continue their activities.

As this Avignon Forum is being held under the aegis of the French Presidency of the European Union, I should like to end by paying tribute to the effective cooperation that exists between the European Union and the development agencies of many Member States on the one hand, and the Aga Khan Development Network on the other. And since we are in France, I should particularly like to express my pleasure at the cooperation that exists with the French Development Agency and its network.

Culture is not just an added extra or a luxury. QED.

I hope I have demonstrated the hugely beneficial effects of serious initiatives in the field of culture, whether they can be measured in economic terms or can be perceived in terms of the progress made by pluralism and, as a result, the improvement in quality of life. Culture is not just an added extra or a luxury. QED.

Thank you.

Official French version

Madame le Ministre de la culture et de la communication,
Madame le Commissaire européen responsable de la société de l’information et des médias,
Mesdames et Messieurs les Ministres,
Mesdames et Messieurs les hauts représentants de l’Union Européenne,
Mesdames et Messieurs les hauts représentants d’organisations et institutions internationales,
Mesdames et Messieurs les hauts représentants de la Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur et du département du Vaucluse,
Madame la députée maire d’Avignon,
Mesdames et Messieurs les représentants du monde de la culture et de l’économie,
Mesdames, Messieurs:

Monsieur le Président de la République et vous-même, Madame le Ministre, m’avez fait un grand honneur et une grande joie en m’invitant à dire quelques mots à l’occasion de ce Forum d’Avignon.

Vous m’avez demandé de vous dire un peu de mon expérience sur un sujet dont vous savez qu’il me tient très à cœur : “La valeur et l’importance de la diversité culturelle et son rôle en faveur de la paix et du développement.”

En effet, il y a cinquante ans exactement, lorsque j’ai succédé à l’Imamat de mon grand père, j’ai constaté que les guerres, l’indifférence, la négligence, la volonté d’uniformiser les cultures à l’occasion des colonisations, ou encore le désir de moderniser le bâti, avaient entrainé des pertes irrémédiables de traits distinctifs importants de la culture des pays en voie de développement, en particulier celles des pays musulmans. Autrement, dit les traits distinctifs des cultures de ces pays, dont la définition de l’UNESCO soulignent le caractère fondamental, périclitaient. Il fallait réagir.

C’est ma défense de ces cultures, au travers du Réseau Aga Khan pour le Développement, et plus particulièrement son agence spécialisée, le Trust Aga Khan pour la Culture, que je souhaite évoquer aujourd’hui. Ce Trust pour la Culture déploie ses activités dans trois domaines principaux :

  • le Programme de soutien aux villes historiques,
  • le Prix Aga Khan d’architecture, et
  • le Programme d’éducation et culture.

Toutes ces activités, chacune se déclinant en de nombreux sous programmes dans des dizaines de pays, obéissent à trois principes fondamentaux :

  • développer l’autonomie des bénéficiaires,
  • impliquer les communautés locales, et
  • s’assurer du concours de partenaires publiques et privés.

Il m’a semblé que le mieux, dans le temps imparti, serait de vous présenter trois exemples de projets réalisés au sein de cette institution, mon souhait étant qu’ils constituent une référence utile pour les débats qui animeront ce Forum au cours des prochains jours.

Trois aspects sont communs à nos programmes :

  • ils se déroulent dans un monde pauvre qui se trouve en présence d’importantes forces centrifuges, parfois même conflictuelles;
  • ils sont conçus pour maximiser leur impact favorable sur les économies, et la qualité de vie au sens le plus large, des populations concernées;
  • ils sont pensés dans la durée, même jusqu’à vingt-cinq ans, de manière à leur permettre de devenir autosuffisants tant sur le plan des ressources humaines que financièrement.

Ceci étant posé, j’évoquerai comme premier exemple un programme dans le domaine des œuvres de l’esprit, la musique.

Je voudrais que vous imaginiez l’histoire complexe, la diversité et la richesse des musiques de pays comme le Kazakhstan, la République Kirghize, le Tadjikistan, l’Ouzbékistan ou l’Afghanistan. J’ai malheureusement constaté que ces cultures musicales d’Asie Centrale étaient en perdition, pour les raisons que j’exprimais il y a un instant. Non seulement leur mémoire se perdait, mais les schémas musicaux imposés de l’extérieur, souvent avec des arrières pensées politiques, étaient en passe de créer une uniformité, une grisaille culturelle. Ces processus ont conduit, dans le domaine de la musique que j’évoque ici, mais comme dans bien d’autres, à une perte d’identité.

Dans un monde qui se dit globalisé, certains peuvent trouver normal, voire souhaitable, une uniformisation des cultures. Je crois pour ma part que les repères identitaires culturels de la personne et du groupe sont la source d’une force intérieure propice à des relations apaisées. Je crois également à la force de la pluralité, sans laquelle aucun échange ne peut avoir lieu. Cette notion fait pour moi partie intégrante de la définition même d’une réelle qualité de vie.

Dans l’exemple de la musique que j’évoque ici il s’est agi, avec le Trust, de relever le défi en créant l’Aga Khan Music Initiative. Nous avons donné à ce projet le nom de « Route de la Soie », tous les pays en question se trouvant sur cette route, à nulle autre pareille, qui reliait la Chine et l’Europe.

L’objectif à long terme est celui-ci :

  • donner une impulsion décisive à l’étude et à la recherche;
  • former de nouvelles générations de jeunes artistes;
  • permettre la renaissance de festivals, concerts et représentations dans les pays d’origine de ces musiques;
  • faire connaître ces musiques non seulement dans les pays voisins, mais également dans d’autres pays Musulmans et en Occident.

Aujourd’hui nous assistons à une véritable renaissance de la musique dans ces pays lointains. Ce type de programme a au surplus l’immense qualité de promouvoir le pluralisme culturel, et, ce qui est peut-être plus difficile à appréhender, la légitimité du pluralisme en tant que principe d’organisation d’une société.

Ce résultat n’est pas mesurable avec les outils de l’économiste, mais contribue, je le vérifie à chaque fois, à une renaissance de la conscience des spécificités culturelles et à des progrès sensibles en termes de qualité de la vie. C’est certainement la raison pour laquelle, lorsqu’une collectivité a été témoin et acteur d’une expérience en faveur du pluralisme, elle aspire à la voir se développer dans d’autres domaines.

De même qu’il est bon que les musiques traditionnelles soient retrouvées et diffusées de par le monde, de même il est important, ce sera mon second exemple, que les jeunes architectes aient la faculté de puiser leur inspiration librement dans toutes les traditions en commençant par la leur. Les architectes de l’orient doivent avoir accès aux meilleures sources de l’occident et vice versa.

C’est dans ce but que le Trust Aga Khan pour la Culture a conçu ARCHNET, le situant au Massachusetts Institute of Technology afin d’en assurer le devenir sur le plan technologique.

Il s’agit encore une fois d’une œuvre de l’esprit, un forum en ligne, une encyclopédie électronique de l’environnement bâti.

Cet outil permet notamment aux architectes des pays en voie de développement d’accéder à des connaissances et des techniques qui leur permettent de construire des bâtiments sans précédent dans leur histoire, par exemple des aéroports, des hôpitaux ou des complexes modernes de bureaux, sans interdire l’intégration d’éléments de leur propre culture. Autrement dit, il est exclut de rejeter les apports techniques de la modernité, mais d’autre part il est essentiel de les assimiler dans le cadre socio-culturel qui les accueille.

L’objectif recherché lorsque nous avons conçu ARCHNET, aujourd’hui atteint, était de susciter une communauté mondiale d’architectes, d’urbanistes, de professeurs et d’étudiants partageant leurs connaissances, en ligne, dans le domaine de l’environnement bâti. Selon les derniers chiffres, cette communauté compte plus de 60.000 membres. A octobre, la croissance, par rapport à l’année dernière, en ouverture sur le site et de pages visitées était en augmentation de 30%.

Mon troisième exemple est celui de la restauration par le Trust Aga Khan de villes historiques et de leurs parcs. Nous sommes intervenus dans ce registre en Afghanistan, au Tadjikistan, en Bosnie Herzégovine, en Egypte, en Syrie, aux Indes, au Pakistan, au Kenya, à Zanzibar et au Mali. Nous avons ainsi contribué à faire revivre des économies rurales et urbaines en mobilisant des sites et des bâtiments historiques qui constituent le cadre de vie des populations qui sont parmi les plus pauvres des pays concernés.

Dans ce contexte il convient aussi de parler du moteur extraordinaire que constituent les partenariats public-privé. Je citerai ici le Dr Manmohan Singh, Premier ministre indien en 2004, qui avait déclaré : « J’espère que plus de partenariats public-privé pourront prospérer pour conserver et restaurer les monuments de nos ancêtres, qui sont malheureusement délaissés et négligés dans nos cités et nos villes. » J’ai été, je dois vous le dire, particulièrement heureux qu’il fasse cette déclaration au Mausolée de l’Empereur Humayun, près de Dehli, restauré grâce à un efficace partenariat entre l’Etat indien et le Trust Aga Khan pour la Culture.

Nous avons appris la richesse et l’efficacité des partenariats public-privé. C’est précisément cette leçon que j’applique dans le cadre de la réhabilitation du domaine de Chantilly, programme que je conduis à titre personnel, la main dans la main, avec l’Institut de France, la ville de Chantilly, le Département de l’Oise, la Région Picardie et France-Galop.

Ces exemples comptent parmi ceux dont l’impact peut être mesuré en utilisant les outils traditionnels de l’économie, tel l’impact sur une démographie donnée et l’amélioration quantifiée dans les paramètres de la qualité de la vie. Ceci me permet d’espérer, pour la première fois, que ce type d’intervention pourra être financé par les grandes agences financières internationales, sans encourir le risque qu’elles nous qualifient de carnivores budgétaires.

Mon expérience va ainsi tout à fait dans le sens de ce que disiez tout à l’heure, Madame le Ministre : « La culture n’est pas dans un monde à part, elle s’insère dans un environnement économique bien réel ».

Pour terminer je voudrais vous dire sous une autre forme ce à quoi j’ai déjà fait allusion indirectement : je suis très soucieux du vide qui sépare les cultures. Ce vide n’est cependant pas ce que l’on appelle à tort le choc des civilisations. Le vide est tout aussi dangereux potentiellement qu’un choc, car l’ignorance de l’autre et la méconnaissance de la richesse que constitue la pluralité peuvent déboucher sur le mépris, la haine et la guerre. Le vide cependant peut être comblé, alors que le choc est irrémédiable.

Ce vide nous en avons éminemment conscience et c’est la raison profonde pour laquelle nous agissons. Je vous ai donné quelques exemples mais il en est bien d’autre, tel le musée Aga Khan qui sera construit à Toronto pour devenir le centre spécialisé en Amérique du Nord de l’art islamique et échanger avec tous les grands musées d’occident.

J’espère beaucoup que ces partenariats pourront se développer avec les Etats, les organisations internationales et leurs agences de développement. Ils nous ont considérablement soutenu et aidé dans le passé et je suis sûr qu’ils trouveront dans cet outil de nouvelles voies pour poursuivre leur action.

Puisque ce Forum d’Avignon se déroule sous l’égide de la Présidence française de l’Union Européenne, je saluerai en terminant la coopération efficace qui existe entre l’Union Européenne et les agences de développement de nombreux Etats de l’Union, d’une part, et le Réseau Aga Khan pour le Développement, d’autre part. Et puisque nous sommes en France permettez que je me réjouisse particulièrement de la coopération qui existe avec l’Agence Française de Développement et son réseau.

J’espère avoir démontré les effets éminemment bénéfiques d’initiatives sérieuses dans le domaine de la culture, qu’ils soient mesurables en termes économiques ou perceptibles en termes de progrès du pluralisme, et donc de la qualité de la vie. La culture n’est décidément ni un simple complément, ni un luxe. CQFD.

Je vous remercie.

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)