Does daily life carry the same importance as eternal life?

In Islam, they are the same thing. One cannot separate faith from the world. [Emphasis added.]

This is one of the greatest difficulties that the non-Muslim world has, because the Judaic Christian societies developed with that notion of separation. For the Muslims, that separation is not possible. We are expected to live our faith every day, in every hour. One of the difficulties that we are facing in the Muslim and non-Muslim worlds, is the articulation of the difference in values in a comprehensive form. However, this does not mean that we are in conflict. They are just different values.

I would like the non-Muslim societies to accept the values of Islam. If Islam says that we do not separate the world from faith, the Western world should accept that. I would go further and say: it is a wonderful way to live! It is an extraordinary blessing to be able to live our faith everyday! Making ethic the way in which you live your daily life, and not only in occasions such as death, a marriage or a birth.

MAYBE INCOMPLETE: Although extensive portions from this interview are available below, they do not appear to, or may not, comprise the entire interview and we would be very grateful if any of our readers who may have the complete transcript would kindly share it with us. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

Interviewers: António Marujo and Faranaz Keshavjee

Original in English — Click here for the published translation in Portuguese

He considers himself a spiritual leader as opposed to a powerful businessman. He is interested in fighting poverty by promoting self-sufficiency to people and culture. He believes that calling upon faith in conflict situations affects all religions. The Aga Khan, spiritual leader of the Ismaili Muslims, 71 years of age, rarely gives interviews. During his passage through Lisbon, some days ago, he spoke to P2.

Courteous, ever smiling, those who are close to him say he is demanding. That is what happens in the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), a group of agencies working in fields such as micro-finance, rural development or even in lucrative sectors such as tourism, aviation, banking or industry. Shah Karim Al-Husseini. Aga Khan IV, as he designated by the Ismailis, took on the role of 49th hereditary Imam of the Time (since Prophet Muhammad), on July 11th 1957. He was in Portugal, some days ago, to mark the conclusion of his Golden Jubilee.

António Marujo/Faranaz Keshavjee: Within the religious context, the term “Your Sanctity” is used when addressing a religious leader. Such is the case of the Pope or the Dalai Lama. In your case, “Your Highness” is …

His Highness the Aga Khan: Yes, it is a secular title …

AM/FK: … you are invited by Governments, you have a diplomatic statute, and you are known for your personal wealth …

AK: … from what people say about my personal wealth. I can assure you that they do not have access to my accounts. I can also say that, if at any given time, the banks would lend me money based on what the news reports say, I would be very rich! (Laughs) However, I could not compete with Mr. [Bill] Gates in this area, I can assure you.

AM/FK: Are we looking at powerful businessman or a religious Muslim leader?

The nature of Imamat is, therefore, of becoming involved in activities, which will have a direct impact on the quality of people’s lives. If this work is undertaken under the name of Aga Khan, it is undertaken in the name of the Imamat and not under the Aga Khan’s personal name. The notion that an institution carrying the name Aga Khan is personal is incorrect, whether it is a university, a school or a project in the field of micro-finance.

AK: No, I have nothing to do with entrepreneurship; in Islam, an Imam, whether Shia or Suni, has responsibilities, firstly for the safety of the community; secondly, he is responsible for the quality of material life, for the daily lives. The nature of Imamat is, therefore, of becoming involved in activities, which will have a direct impact on the quality of people’s lives.

If this work is undertaken under the name of Aga Khan, it is undertaken in the name of the Imamat and not under the Aga Khan’s personal name. I have undertaken some personal initiatives is several companies, but do not hold anything which may have resulted from them, because I have other issues which I am concerned with.

AM/FK: Don’t you really have anything?

AK: The only thing, which is still private, is a long tradition in the organisation of horse racing and horse breeding, which my children have given continuity to. But I am not, or ever will be, an entrepreneur.

I am the sole shareholder of the Aga Khan Development Network, but I never withdraw dividends, because the objective is to serve from the resources, and not to make them personal. The notion that an institution carrying the name Aga Khan is personal is incorrect, whether it is a university, a school or a project in the field of micro-finance.

AM/FK: In 1976, you mentioned that Prophet Muhammad understood the importance of new solutions for the daily lives that would not affect the principles of Islam. Does this motivate the undertakings of the AKDN?

For example, in Islam, we do not use the terms philanthropy or charity. Islam says that the best form of charity, to use the term, is by helping people to become self-sufficient. It is to give in such a way that the person becomes master of one’s own destiny.

AK: Definitely. Firstly, the notion of dealing with poverty. Islam has a group of very strong orientations on how to help people, which is different (no more or less better) from the Christian world. For example, in Islam, we do not use the terms philanthropy or charity [as in Christianity].

Islam says that the best form of charity, to use the term, is by helping people to become self-sufficient. It is to give in such a way that the person becomes master of one’s own destiny. This is a very clear affirmation to all Muslims, and it underlies our health programmes, education … it is helping people to help themselves. The same is applicable to micro-finance. Whatever the need of the poor, one should help to resolve it. One does not specify material poverty, disease, or divisions within the family.

AM/FK: Does daily life carry the same importance as eternal life?

AK: In Islam, they are the same thing. One cannot separate faith from the world. This is one of the greatest difficulties that the non-Muslim world has, because the Judaic Christian societies developed with that notion of separation. For the Muslims, that separation is not possible. We are expected to live our faith every day, in every hour. [Emphasis added]

One of the difficulties that we are facing in the Muslim and non-Muslim worlds, is the articulation of the difference in values in a comprehensive form. However, this does not mean that we are in conflict. They are just different values.

AM/FK: One of the differences is locality, debated in countries such as Portugal, Turkey, and France. For many, faith should remain confined to a private space. You mentioned that Islam doesn’t separate faith from the world. How do you perceive this notion?

AK: I would like the non-Muslim societies to accept the values of Islam. If Islam says that we do not separate the world from faith, the Western world should accept that. I would go further and say: it is a wonderful way to live! It is an extraordinary blessing to be able to live our faith everyday! Making ethic the way in which you live your daily life, and not only in occasions such as death, a marriage or a birth. I am not criticising anyone. I am saying that secular society, by the nature of secularity and the demands of time, provokes in people the need to first place the world and faith after. This is not a part of Islam.

AM/FK: Upon receiving the Award for Tolerance from the Tutzing Evangelic Academy, in Germany, you stated: “Instead of shouting at one another, we should listen to each other and learn from each other.” You said that “fear is the source of intolerance.” In spite of your words and those of several religious leaders, many believers do not listen to this message. What is yet to be done?

I have serious doubts about the ecumenical discourse, and about what it can reach, but I do not have any doubts about cosmopolitan ethics…. Inter-religious dialogue, yes, but I would prefer that it be based upon a cosmopolitan ethic. It would have to include non-believers.

AK: There will always be limits in inter-religious dialogue, when religions, in their essence, cannot attain a consensus above a common platform, when proselytism is, therefore, worth more. There are several forms of proselytism and, in several religions, proselytism is demanded. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the principle of a cosmopolitan ethic, which is not an ethic oriented by faith, or for a society. I speak of an ethic under which all people can live within a same society, and not of a society that reflects the ethic of solely one faith. I would call that ethic, quality of life.

I have serious doubts about the ecumenical discourse, and about what it can reach, but I do not have any doubts about cosmopolitan ethics. I believe that people share the same basic worries, joys, and sadness. If we can reach a consensus in terms of cosmopolitan ethics, we will have attained something, which is very important.

The Qur’an has a very important ayat [verse], in which God says: “I have created you” — “you” means mankind — “male and female, from one sole, only one soul.” This is the most extraordinary expression on the unity of the human race. It is within this context that we must work.

AM/FK: In Lisbon, a couple of weeks ago, Rabi René Sirat suggested a sort of G8 of religious leaders. Could this be a good idea, for the progress of inter-religious dialogue?

AK: Inter-religious dialogue, yes, but I would prefer that it be based upon a cosmopolitan ethic. It would have to include non-believers. Because I am talking about human society and I cannot judge an individual’s belief at any given time, in his life or mine. My experience is that belief is not necessarily constant; it varies according to age, to one’s circumstances and the family in which one was educated.

AM/FK: In religions such as Islam or Christianity, torment and pain are parts of faith. In Shiism and other Muslim groups, martyrdom has thus been viewed. How must one live Islam?

AK: We should firstly look at the notion of martyrdom, which has been expressed, in all religions, as an individual’s effort to defend is faith. Martyrdom is the response to an attack — here you had the Inquisition, for example … I do not believe that currently Islam is under attack. There are primarily political and not theological issues, which were bred from political conflict, and were afterwards connected to religious aspects. And that is true for Northern Ireland or the Middle East.

Islam is different. If we are happy, as Muslims, we should thank God for our happiness. God reflects his presence, not only through suffering in human life, but also through happiness, through friendship. There is no requisite that says a Muslim cannot be a happy person. One can find expressions of happiness in the Qur’an — we do not, in any way, face happiness as unreligious.

AM/FK: The Ismailis are known as a very generous community in material terms. However, during these Golden Jubilee celebrations, you have introduced the notion of Time and Knowledge. What is it about?

Sharing time and knowledge is saying that I will make available the knowledge that I have to those people who, otherwise, would not have access to it…. I would like to see the employment of time and knowledge in areas, which we desperately need. One of these is government.

AK: In Shia Islam, intellect is a key component of faith. Intellect allows us to understand the creation of God. We live in a world in which there is increasingly more information that people can employ. The question is, how we access it and how we employ it. In many countries in which we work, in Africa and in Asia, there is a colonial history, and they are facing difficulties in overcoming that history to the history of today and the objectives for tomorrow.

One of the ways to solve the problem is through institutional and human enablement, so that society can create its own knowledge base, through universities, research, etc. Sharing time and knowledge is saying that I will make available the knowledge that I have to those people who, otherwise, would not have access to it. One would make it available in such a form that this knowledge could be employed in building capacities for the future, which can happen in many different forms: joint research, teachers teaching in a school over a couple of years in order to increase the quality in teaching mathematics, financial institutions that develop products for micro-finance.

AM/FK: Do you restrict the concept to these fields?

AK: I would like to see the employment of time and knowledge in areas, which we desperately need. One of these is government. The constitutionality of the developing world is one of the fundamental weaknesses. We see this is Africa, in Asia: the constitutions were built in such a way that they do not correspond to the demographical structures or to the political structures of these countries. And governments are suffering from increasing difficulties.

These are areas that we desperately need, in order to promote good governance, the quality of medicine or education. During the 50s and 60s, we faced a conflict of dogmas, between the Soviet empire’s communism and the West’s capitalism. The debate about development was developed around numbers.

AM/FK: As in, for example?

[In the 50s and 60s] the debate about development was developed around numbers.One would ask: how many people had access to education or health services? No one wondered whether the teaching was so bad that it became useless. Or whether healthcare was so horrible that people were paying for treatments they should never pay for.

AK: One would ask: how many people had access to education or health services? No one wondered whether the teaching was so bad that it became useless. Or whether healthcare was so horrible that people were paying for treatments they should never pay for. Or where the best minds were going, who was leaving their country because there weren’t institutions concerned with quality. One of the things we want to do in AKDN is try to build quality in our institutions [see P2 days 6, 8, 10, 21 July].

The late (Pakistani President) Zia ul-Haq, when delivering the letter for the Aga Khan University, only demanded three conditions. One of them was: “Give Pakistan a medical science faculty where the graduates obtain degrees that are worldly recognised.” A country with 140 million inhabitants had courses in medicine that were not recognised anywhere else.

AM/FK: In Paris, during the month of June, you mentioned a notion of habitat from a cultural point of view and in benefit of the poor. Is culture, as a synthesis of all the dimensions in life, more important than the economy, which has been attributed so much value?

AK: Culture has a very important impact in people’s perception about the legitimacy of pluralism. We can see that in many recent crises in Africa and Asia, when there were conflicts amongst the communities, one of the main targets were the cultural expressions of those communities …

AM/FK: As in the Buddhas of Bamiyan, in Afghanistan …

AK: …culture is perceived as the property of a given community. If we protect the pluralism of cultures, we are protecting the notion that pluralism is a part of human society and of our history.

One of the first things that the poor do, from the moment in which they can save, even in small quantities, is to spend their savings in the betterment of their habitat. They put metal roofs on African huts; they consolidate the buildings in urban peripheries. The habitat’s quality is an indicator of the quality of life.

One of the major problems is knowing whether the progress in the quality of the habitat is technically safe and intelligent. In many cases, it is technically unsafe, because people do not understand how one progresses from an unintelligent habitat to an intelligent one. You can observe this in the coastal areas of Africa and Asia, or in the seismic regions of Asia. Although habitats vary, they do not contemplate technical changes, as they should.

AM/FK: So, culture is important?

AK: Yes, culture is important. People invest in their habitat as an example of the quality of life. And, yes, there are enormous problems in changing the habitat whilst [sic?] quality of life. I am very frustrated: if I look at the map of the Islamic world, there is a massive concentration of Muslims in the most seismic regions in the world. But what do we learn? Can we make people live differently? Can they build differently? Can they can move from high-risk areas and valleys to low risk areas?

AM/FK: In Professor Daftary’s book about the history of the Ismailis [edited by the Catholic University], he writes that Sunni Islam is responsible for the notion that Islam is monotheistic. We know that Islam is plural, but what is specific about Ismailism?

AK: It is part of the Shia tradition, and not Sunni. It also has a living Imam, who is the Imam of the Time, as opposed to other Shia traditions, which presently do not have a living Imam. Thirdly, it has a very international community, with its own pluralism. We have traditions, which co-exist with this time, but with different histories: that of Central Asia, of Pakistan, and the Indian sub-continent, of Syria … Therefore, we have to bring them together: we teach our faith in seven different languages because of this pluralism.

However, in the Islamic world, as in the Christian world, there have existed attempts of normatisism [sic] — that is, the imposition of a unique perspective within the Ummah [community of believers]. That has been rejected since the time of the Prophet, because he himself acknowledged that, in his time, diversity in the interpretation of faith already existed. If you read the hadith [teachings of the Prophet], you will note that he was called upon many times, by the members of the Muslim community, to interpret the Qur’an or a specific ayat.

AM/FK: Then, there can be various interpretations?

The diversity in interpretation is something that is inherent to human society. The attempt to normatise has a very little chance to succeed and it would be unethical to the essence of Islam.

AK: The diversity in interpretation is something that is inherent to human society. The attempt to normatise has a very little chance to succeed and it would be unethical to the essence of Islam. There is a very famous ayat in the Qur’an that says: “To yourself, your faith. To myself, my faith.” There is a great debate about whether this ayat refers to the intra-Muslim relationship or to the relationship between Muslims and non-Muslims. But the ayat is there!

AM/FK: In many occasions, the name of God is used for certain acts of violence. Why don’t religious leaders speak out about these situations?

AK: We do it. In societies where a particular vision is being imposed, we have contributed for that not to occur. But we do act; we just don’t mention that we did this or that. We are a discreet community; it is one of our traditions.

The use of faith in a conflict situation unfortunately affects all religions. In India there are Hindus fighting against Muslims, in Northern Ireland there are Catholics fighting against Protestants, In Afghanistan, Shias against Sunnis. Unfortunately, it is a part of faith; better yet, they are emanations of faith. Personally, I would prefer it if pluralism was valued, instead of fighting it.

AM/FK: What can one do to overcome conflict?

AK: Where conflict exists, one must procure a mediated solution. Everything we do should be in the sense of preventing situations from becoming conflicts. However, there are cases where the forces in action are out of our control. These forces are fear, insecurity — communities who think they are at risk and therefore react, out of fear.

There is a second reason: the iniquity of society. There are desperately poor isolated communities. They look for solutions, but always accuse those who they understand as the reason for their despair. What we do, is anticipate where these forces may become dangerous, by trying to overcome the problem of extreme poverty and of despair. We have done it and, in some cases, we have succeeded.

Faith is sometimes used to justify war, but in most cases faith is not the cause, there are other forces, to which faith is added. When that happens, it is much more difficult to overcome.

AM/FK: In Islam, as in Christianity, the role of the female has been debated. There are people who say that they would like to see your daughter, Princess Zahra, as the next Imam. However, tradition claims it has to be the eldest son …

AK: As far as I know, there is no Muslim community in history that has had a woman as Imam.

AM/FK: In that case, we can never see a woman as Imam?

AK: Absolutely not. However, women in our society are capable of developing a leadership role. Zahra studied at Harvard, has worked in the sense of helping to create capacities in various parts of the world. She is the first woman in my family with a university education, and I would hope that the future generations will refer both to men and women.

I do not want you to perceive that women are not valued. Women are very, very valued. If you look at the history of Islam, Khadija, the Prophet’s first wife, had an extremely important role, both in his spiritual life, as in his worldly life.

AM/FK: How are the projects which you have launched in Portugal? Can we expect to have, in Lisbon, a school of excellence as part of your network of academies?

AK: Portugal is a very important country …

AM/FK: Is that why you have come to celebrate your Golden Jubilee?

Portugal is a very important country … there is a political wish to recognise the structures of faith and to give them an appropriate role in society.

AK: I have been to several other places. But Portugal has very important factors: in the Portuguese society, pluralism is a social construction which functions and that is relevant in any society, whether it be industrial or of any other kind. Secondly, there is a political wish to recognise the structures of faith and to give them an appropriate role in society.

The third reason is that Portugal has an extraordinary history and the country understands pluralism. The majority of Portuguese history has been its involvement in pluralism over centuries; in your history there is an acceptance of difference. What we now want to do with Portugal is to reflect over issues, which we want to deal with in the future.

AM/FK: And what are they?

AK: One of them is the relation between Europe, or the Western world, with the rest of the Muslim world, to do everything we can to work together and to enable mutual understanding. An institution such as the Academy would bring people together in a pluralistic education, with curricular contents that would not necessarily be part of the standard education in Portugal. Therefore, we work with the International Baccalaureate, to which other contents, which we deem necessary, are added.

We also want to build bridges, from the Portuguese institutions, to build civil society outside of Portugal. We have to look at the decades of governing fragility in Asia and in Africa, and probably elsewhere. One of the most creative forms of corresponding to this frailty is by building a civil society.

If you look towards Bangladesh today, the country has a very fragile government, but has progressed because civil society institutions are working.

If you look towards Bangladesh today, the country has a very fragile government, but has progressed because civil society institutions are working. If you speak with Kofi Annan and ask him what are the resources that he was able to mobilise in Kenya, to unite [the Prime Minister Raila] Odinga and [President] Kibaki at the same table, he will tell you: civil society was the most powerful force.

AM/FK: And can Portugal help?

AK: The majority of developing countries cannot build civil society as rapidly as would be desirable. Therefore, we have to get hold of it from everywhere we can. Portugal has a solid civil society! You are humble with that respect, but you shouldn’t be.

We are very honoured and proud by the fact that the Portuguese government and its institutions want to work with us. We will do everything that is possible to establish this partnership. I believe it may even become a case study for other countries. You are very creative in relation to your perspectives for the future.

AM/FK: That is a great responsibility.

AK: You know, that the smaller we are, the greater are our responsibilities. And this is true for the communities; it is true for the countries …

Published translation in Portuguese

Diz que é um líder religioso e não um poderoso empresário. Está interessado em combater a pobreza promovendo a autonomia das pessoas e a cultura. Acredita que a invocação da fé no conflito afecta todas as religiões. O Aga Khan, líder espiritual dos muçulmanos ismailis, 71 anos, raramente dá entrevistas. Há dias, na sua passagem por Lisboa, falou ao P2.

Afável, sempre sorridente, dizem os que com ele privam que é uma pessoa exigente. É isso que acontece na Rede Aga Khan para o Desenvolvimento (AKDN), conjunto de agências que trabalham em áreas como o microcrédito, o desenvolvimento rural ou mesmo em sectores lucrativos como o turismo, aviação, banca ou indústria. Shah Karim Al-Husseini, Aga Khan o IV, como é designado pelos ismailis, tomou posse como 49.º imã do tempo (após o profeta Maomé) a 11 de Julho de 1957. Esteve há dias em Portugal para assinalar o encerramento do seu jubileu de ouro.

António Marujo/Faranaz Keshavjee: No contexto religioso, usa-se o título sua santidade quando nos dirigimos a um líder religioso. É o exemplo do Papa ou do Dalai Lama. No seu caso, sua alteza é…

His Highness the Aga Khan: Sim, é um título secular…

AM/FK: … é convidado pelos governos, tem um estatuto diplomático, é conhecido pela sua fortuna pessoal…

AK: … pelo que as pessoas dizem da minha fortuna pessoal. Posso assegurar-lhe que não têm acesso às minhas contas. Posso também dizer que, se alguma vez os bancos me emprestassem dinheiro com base no que dizem os relatos dos jornais, eu seria muito rico! (risos) Mas não poderia competir com o senhor [Bill] Gates nesta matéria, posso assegurar-lhe.

AM/FK: Estamos perante um poderoso empresário ou um líder religioso muçulmano?

AK: Não, não tenho nada a ver com empreendedorismo: no islão, um imã, xiita ou sunita, tem responsabilidades, antes de mais, pela segurança do povo; em segundo lugar, tem responsabilidade pela qualidade de vida material, pelo quotidiano. A natureza do imamato é portanto a de se envolver nas actividades com impacto directo na qualidade de vida das pessoas.

Se este trabalho é realizado com o nome Aga Khan, ele é feito em nome do imamato e não em nome pessoal do Aga Khan. Tenho tido algumas iniciativas pessoais em empresas, mas não tenho praticamente nada que delas tivesse sobrado, porque há muito mais com que me preocupar.

AM/FK: Não tem mesmo nada?

AK: A única coisa ainda privada é uma longa tradição de organização de corridas e de criação de cavalos que os meus filhos têm continuado. Mas não sou nem nunca me tornarei um empresário.

Sou o único accionista do Fundo Aga Khan para o Desenvolvimento Económico, mas nunca retiro dividendos, porque o objectivo é servir com os recursos e não personalizá-los. É incorrecta a noção de que uma instituição com o nome Aga Khan é pessoal. Seja ela uma universidade, um hospital, uma escola ou um projecto de microcrédito.

AM/FK: Em 1976, mencionou que o profeta Maomé entendeu a importância de novas soluções para a vida quotidiana sem afectar os princípios do islão. É isso que motiva o trabalho da AKDN?

AK: Definitivamente. Em primeiro lugar, a noção de lidar com a pobreza. O islão tem um conjunto de orientações muito forte sobre como ajudar as pessoas, diferente (não melhores ou menos boas) das do mundo cristão. Por exemplo, no islão não usamos a expressão filantropia ou caridade [como no cristianismo].

O islão diz que a melhor forma de caridade, para utilizar a palavra, é ajudar as pessoas a tornarem-se independentes. É dar de modo que a pessoa se torne mestre do seu próprio destino. Esta é uma afirmação muito clara para todos os muçulmanos e é o que guia os nossos programas de saúde, educação… é ajudar as pessoas a ajudarem-se a si próprias. O mesmo se aplica ao microcrédito. Qualquer que seja a necessidade dos pobres, deve ajudar-se a resolvê-la. Não se especifica pobreza material, doenças ou divisão na família.

AM/FK: A vida quotidiana tem a mesma importância que a vida eterna?

AK: No islão, elas são a mesma coisa. Não se pode separar a fé e o mundo. Isto é das maiores dificuldades que o mundo não muçulmano tem, porque as sociedades judaico-cristãs evoluíram com a noção dessa separação. Para os muçulmanos, a separação não é possível. Espera-se que vivamos a nossa fé todos os dias, a toda a hora.

Uma das dificuldades que estamos a ter entre o mundo muçulmano e o não-muçulmano é a de articular de forma compreensiva a diferença nos valores. Mas isto não quer dizer que estejamos em conflito. São apenas valores diferentes.

AM/FK: Uma das diferenças é a laicidade, debatida em países como Portugal, Turquia, França. Para muitos, a fé deveria ficar confinada ao espaço privado. Disse que o islão não separa a fé do mundo. Como entende este conceito?

AK: Eu gostaria que as sociedades não muçulmanas aceitassem os valores do islão. Se o islão diz que não separamos o mundo e a fé, o mundo ocidental deveria aceitar isto. Eu iria mais longe e diria: é uma forma maravilhosa de se viver! É uma bênção extraordinária poder viver a fé todos os dias! Fazer da ética a forma como se vive a vida quotidiana e não apenas ocasiões como a morte, um casamento ou um nascimento.

Não estou a criticar ninguém. Digo que a sociedade secular, pela natureza do secularismo e a exigência do tempo, provoca nas pessoas a necessidade de colocar o mundo primeiro e a fé depois. Isto não é parte do islão.

AM/FK: Ao receber o Prémio de Tolerância da Academia Evangélica de Tutzing, na Alemanha, afirmou: “Ao invés de gritarmos uns para os outros, devemos escutar-nos uns aos outros e aprender uns com os outros”. E disse que “o medo é a fonte da intolerância”. Apesar das suas palavras e das de vários líderes religiosos, muitos crentes não escutam essa mensagem. O que é preciso fazer ainda?

AK: Irá haver sempre limites ao diálogo inter-religioso, quando as religiões, na sua essência, já não conseguem chegar a consenso sobre uma plataforma comum, quando o proselitismo passa a valer mais. Há vários tipos de proselitismo e em várias religiões exige-se o proselitismo. Por isso, é necessário trabalhar o princípio de uma ética cosmopolita, que não é uma ética orientada por uma fé ou para uma sociedade. Falo de uma ética em que todos os povos possam viver numa mesma sociedade e não numa sociedade que reflicta a ética de uma só fé. A essa ética eu chamaria qualidade de vida.

Tenho sérias dúvidas sobre o discurso ecuménico e sobre até onde ele pode ir, mas não tenho dúvida nenhuma sobre a ética cosmopolita. Acredito que as pessoas têm as mesmas preocupações básicas, alegrias, tristezas. Se conseguirmos um consenso em termos de ética cosmopolita, teremos algo muito importante.

O Alcorão tem um ayat [versículo] muito importante, em que Deus diz: “Eu criei-vos” – “vos” significa a humanidade – “masculino e feminino, de uma alma, uma alma apenas”. Isto é a expressão mais extraordinária da unidade da raça humana. É nesse contexto que temos de trabalhar.

AM/FK: O rabino René Sirat propôs há poucas semanas em Lisboa uma espécie de G8 de líderes religiosos. Esta pode ser uma boa ideia para fazer progressos no diálogo inter-religioso?

AK: Diálogo inter-religioso, sim, mas eu preferia que fosse na base de uma ética cosmopolita. Teria de incluir pessoas que não acreditam. Porque estou a falar da sociedade humana e não posso fazer julgamentos sobre a crença do indivíduo em nenhuma altura da vida dele ou dela. A minha experiência é a de que a crença não é necessariamente constante; varia de acordo com a idade, as circunstâncias da pessoa e da família onde recebeu a educação.

AM/FK: Em religiões como o islão ou o cristianismo, o sofrimento e a dor são parte da fé. No xiismo e em outros grupos muçulmanos o martírio tem sido visto assim. Como deve o islão ser vivido?

AK: Devemos olhar, primeiro, para a noção de martírio que tem sido expressa, em todas as religiões, como um esforço do indivíduo em defender a sua fé. O martírio é uma resposta a um ataque – aqui tiveram a Inquisição, por exemplo… Não acredito que o islão esteja sob ataque nos dias de hoje. Há assuntos primordialmente políticos e não teológicos, nasceram de conflitos políticos, depois ligaram-se a aspectos religiosos. E isso é verdade para a Irlanda do Norte ou o Médio Oriente.

O islão é diferente. Se estivermos felizes, como muçulmanos temos de agradecer a Deus pela nossa felicidade. Deus reflecte a Sua presença não apenas através do sofrimento na vida humana, mas da alegria, da felicidade, da amizade. Não existe nenhum requisito que diga que o muçulmano não pode ser uma pessoa feliz. Pode encontrar expressões de felicidade no Alcorão, não encaramos a felicidade de forma alguma como irreligiosa.

AM/FK: Os ismailis são conhecidos como uma comunidade muito generosa materialmente. Mas, nestas celebrações do jubileu de ouro, introduziu o conceito de oferta de tempo e de conhecimento. De que se trata?

AK: No islão xiita o intelecto é uma componente-chave da fé. O intelecto permite entender a criação de Deus. Vivemos num mundo em que há cada vez mais informação que as pessoas podem usar. A questão é como acedemos a ela e como a usamos. Muitos países onde trabalhamos, em África e na Ásia, têm uma história colonial e estão a ter dificuldades em passar dessa história para a história de hoje e os objectivos de amanhã.

Uma das formas de resolver o problema é a capacitação institucional e humana, para que a sociedade crie a sua própria base de conhecimento, com universidades, investigação, etc. Partilhar tempo e conhecimento é dizer que disponibilizo o conhecimento que tenho a pessoas que não teriam acesso a ele. Torno-o disponível de tal maneira que possam usar esse conhecimento e construir capacidades para o futuro, o que pode tomar formas diferentes: pesquisas conjuntas, professores a ensinar durante dois anos numa escola para tentar melhorar a qualidade do ensino da matemática, instituições financeiras que desenvolvam produtos em microcrédito.

AM/FK: Restringe o conceito apenas a essas áreas?

AK: Gostaria de ver o uso de tempo e conhecimento em áreas de que necessitamos desesperadamente. Uma delas é a governação. A constitucionalidade, no mundo em desenvolvimento, é uma das fraquezas fundamentais. Vemos isso em África, na Ásia: as constituições foram construídas de tal maneira que não correspondem nem às estruturas demográficas nem às estruturas políticas destes países. E cada vez mais os governos estão a ter dificuldades.

Estas são áreas de que precisamos desesperadamente, de forma a enaltecer a boa governação, a qualidade da medicina ou da educação. Nos anos 50 e 60 tínhamos um conflito de dogmas entre o comunismo do império soviético e o capitalismo do Ocidente. O debate sobre desenvolvimento fazia-se à volta de números.

AM/FK: Como por exemplo?

AK: Perguntava-se quantas pessoas tinham acesso à educação ou ao serviço de saúde. Ninguém perguntava se o ensino era tão mau que se tornava inútil. Ou se a medicina era tão horrível que as pessoas pagavam por tratamentos que nunca deveriam pagar. Ou para onde estavam a ir os melhores cérebros, que saíam do seu país porque não tinham instituições preocupadas com a qualidade. Uma das coisas que queremos fazer na AKDN é tentar construir a qualidade nas nossas instituições [ver P2 de dias 6, 8, 10 e 21 de Julho].

O falecido [Presidente paquistanês] Zia ul-Haq, quando nos deu a carta para a Universidade Aga Khan, só me colocou três condições. Uma delas foi: “Dê ao Paquistão uma faculdade de ciências médicas onde os graduados tenham graus reconhecidos internacionalmente.” Um país com 140 milhões de habitantes tinha graus em medicina que não eram reconhecidos em mais lado nenhum.

AM/FK: Em Junho, em Paris, mencionou o conceito de habitat de um ponto de vista cultural e em benefício dos pobres. A cultura, enquanto síntese de todas as dimensões da vida, é mais importante que a economia, que tem sido tão valorizada?

AK: A cultura tem um impacto muito importante na percepção das pessoas acerca da legitimidade do pluralismo. Podemos ver que em muitas crises recentes em África e na Ásia, quando houve conflitos entre as comunidades, um dos principais alvos foram as expressões culturais dessas comunidades.

AM/FK: Como os budas de Bamiyan, no Afeganistão…

AK: … A cultura é vista como propriedade de uma dada comunidade. Se protegermos o pluralismo das culturas, estamos a proteger a noção de que o pluralismo é parte da sociedade humana e da nossa história.

Uma das primeiras coisas que os pobres fazem, a partir do momento em que conseguem poupar, mesmo em pequenas quantidades, é gastar as poupanças na melhoria do seu habitat. Colocam telhados de metal em cabanas africanas, consolidam os edifícios em periferias urbanas. A qualidade do habitat é um indicador da qualidade de vida.

Um dos maiores problemas é saber se o progresso na qualidade do habitat é tecnicamente seguro e inteligente. Em muitos casos, é tecnicamente inseguro, porque as pessoas não entendem como se passa de um habitat não inteligente para um inteligente. Pode ver isso nas zonas costeiras da África e da Ásia ou nas regiões sísmicas da Ásia. Embora os habitats mudem, não contemplam as mudanças técnicas como deviam.

AM/FK: Então, a cultura é importante?

AK: Sim, a cultura é importante. As pessoas investem no habitat como exemplo da qualidade de vida. E sim, há problemas enormes na mudança do habitat como qualidade de vida. Estou muito frustrado: se olhar para o mapa do mundo islâmico, existe uma concentração massiva de muçulmanos nas zonas mais sísmicas do mundo. Mas o que aprendemos? Conseguimos fazer com que as pessoas vivam de forma diferente? Que construam de forma diferente? Que possam mudar de áreas e vales de alto risco para áreas de baixo risco?

AM/FK: No livro do professor Daftary sobre a história dos ismailis [ed. Universidade Católica], ele escreve que o islão sunita é responsável pela ideia de que o islão é monolítico. Sabemos que o islão é plural, mas o que há de específico no ismailismo?

AK: É parte da tradição xiita e não sunita. Depois, tem um imã vivo, que é o imã do tempo, ao invés de outras tradições xiitas, que não têm um imã vivo hoje. Terceiro, tem uma comunidade muito internacional, com o seu próprio pluralismo. Temos tradições que vivem neste tempo, mas com histórias diferentes: da Ásia central, do Paquistão e do subcontinente indiano, da Síria… Por isso temos de as aproximar: ensinamos a fé em sete línguas diferentes por causa deste pluralismo.

Mas têm existido no mundo muçulmano, tal como no mundo cristão, tentativas de normativismo – ou seja, a imposição de uma única perspectiva na umma [comunidade dos crentes]. Isso foi rejeitado desde o profeta, porque ele próprio reconheceu que, no seu tempo, já havia diversidade de interpretações da fé. Se ler os hadith [ensinamentos do profeta], verá que ele foi procurado muitas vezes por membros da comunidade muçulmana, para interpretar o Alcorão ou determinado ayat.

AM/FK: Então pode haver várias interpretações?

AK: A diversidade de interpretações é algo inerente à sociedade humana. A tentativa de normativizar tem pouquíssimas possibilidades de ser bem sucedida e seria antitética à essência do islão. Existe um ayat muito famoso do Alcorão que diz: “A ti a tua fé. A mim a minha fé.”

Há um grande debate sobre se este ayat se refere à relação intra-muçulmana ou à relação dos muçulmanos com não-muçulmanos. Mas o ayat está lá!

AM/FK: Em muitas ocasiões o nome de Deus é usado para actos de violência. Por que é que os líderes religiosos não se pronunciam mais sobre essas situações?

AK: Nós fazemo-lo. Em sociedades em que se tenta impor uma visão particular, temos contribuído para que isso não aconteça. Mas actuamos, só não dizemos que fizemos isto ou aquilo. Somos uma comunidade discreta, é uma das nossas tradições.

O uso da fé no conflito afecta, infelizmente, todas as religiões. Na Índia há hindus contra muçulmanos, na Irlanda do Norte católicos contra protestantes, no Afeganistão xiitas contra sunitas. É parte da fé, infelizmente; melhor, são emanações da fé. Pessoalmente, preferiria que o pluralismo fosse valorizado, ao invés de o combatermos.

AM/FK: O que fazer para ultrapassar o conflito?

AK: Onde houver conflito, deve-se procurar uma solução mediada. Tudo o que possamos fazer deve ser para evitar que as situações se tornem conflituosas. Mas há casos em que as forças em jogo estão fora do nosso controlo. Essas forças são o medo, a insegurança, comunidades que pensam que estão em risco e que por isso, reagem, por medo.

Há uma segunda razão: a iniquidade na sociedade. Há comunidades isoladas desesperadamente pobres. Procuram soluções mas acusam sempre os que entendem como a causa do seu desespero. O que fazemos é antecipar onde é que essas forças podem tornar-se perigosas, tentando resolver o problema da pobreza extrema e do desespero. Têmo-lo feito e, nalguns casos, temos sido bem sucedidos.

A fé é por vezes usada para justificar a guerra, mas na maior parte dos casos não é a fé que a causa, são outras forças, às quais se acrescenta a fé. Quando isso sucede, é muito mais difícil resolver.

AM/FK: No islão, tal como no cristianismo, o papel da mulher tem sido debatido. Há pessoas que dizem que gostariam de ver a sua filha, a princesa Zahra, como a próxima imã. Mas a tradição diz que deve ser o filho mais velho….

AK: Que eu conheça, não há uma comunidade muçulmana na história que tenha tido uma mulher como um imã.

AM/FK: Então nunca poderemos ver uma mulher como imã?

AK: Absolutamente não. Mas as mulheres na nossa sociedade são capazes de ter um papel de liderança. Zahra estudou em Harvard, tem trabalhado no sentido de ajudar a criar capacidades em várias partes do mundo. É a primeira mulher na minha família com educação universitária e eu esperaria que as gerações futuras se referissem tanto aos homens como às mulheres.

Não quero que se entenda que as mulheres não são valorizadas. As mulheres são muito, muito valorizadas. Se olhar para a história do islão, Khadija, a primeira mulher do profeta, teve um papel extremamente importante, tanto na vida da sua fé como na vida do seu mundo.

AM/FK: Como estão os projectos que lançou em Portugal? Podemos esperar ter em Lisboa uma escola de excelência da vossa rede de academias?

AK: Portugal é um país muito importante…

AM/FK: Por isso veio aqui celebrar o seu jubileu de ouro?

AK: Fui a vários outros sítios. Mas Portugal tem factores muito importantes: na sociedade portuguesa, o pluralismo é uma construção social em funcionamento e isso é relevante em qualquer sociedade, seja industrial ou de outro tipo. Em segundo lugar, há um desejo político de reconhecer estruturas de fé e de lhes dar um papel apropriado na sociedade.

A terceira razão é que Portugal tem uma história extraordinária e o país entende o pluralismo. A maior parte da história de Portugal tem sido a de envolvimento no pluralismo durante séculos, há uma aceitação da diferença na vossa história. O que queremos fazer agora com Portugal é reflectir sobre assuntos que queremos tratar no futuro.

AM/FK: E quais são?

AK: Um deles é a relação entre a Europa ou o mundo ocidental e o resto do mundo muçulmano, fazer tudo o que pudermos para trabalhar juntos e criar capacidades para o entendimento mútuo. Uma instituição como a Academia juntaria pessoas numa educação pluralista, com conteúdos curriculares que não seriam necessariamente parte da educação-padrão em Portugal. Por isso trabalhamos com o International Baccaleaureate, acrescido de outros conteúdos que sentimos ser necessários.

Queremos também fazer pontes, a partir das instituições portuguesas, para construir a sociedade civil fora de Portugal. Temos de olhar para décadas de fragilidade governativa, na Ásia, em África e provavelmente noutros lugares. Uma das formas mais criativas de responder a esta fragilidade é construindo uma sociedade civil.

Se olhar hoje para o Bangladesh, o país tem um governo muito frágil, mas tem feito progressos porque as instituições da sociedade civil estão a funcionar. Se falar com Kofi Annan e lhe perguntar quais foram os recursos que conseguiu mobilizar no Quénia, para juntar [o primeiro-ministro Raila] Odinga e o [Presidente Mwai] Kibaki à mesma mesa, ele dir-lhe-á: a força mais poderosa foi a sociedade civil.

AM/FK: E Portugal pode ajudar?

AK: A maior parte dos países em desenvolvimento não podem construir a sociedade civil tão rápido como seria desejável. Por isso temos de ir buscar a todos os lados onde pudermos. Portugal tem uma sociedade civil sólida! Vocês são humildes a esse respeito, mas não deviam.

Estamos muito honrados e orgulhosos pelo facto de o Governo português e as suas instituições quererem trabalhar connosco. Faremos todos os possíveis para que esta parceria se torne fundadora. Acredito até que se possa tornar um caso de estudo para outros países. Vocês são muito criativos em relação às perspectivas para o futuro.

AM/FK: É uma grande responsabilidade, essa.

AK: Sabe que quanto mais pequenos somos, maiores são as nossas responsabilidades. E isto é verdade para as comunidades, é verdade para os países…

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)