[Official translation] The improvement of rural housing is obviously an important goal in the development process, first to improve the quality of life in rural populations, which are often the poorest in these countries, but also to pass on the message that, for a start, these people are not forgotten by those who support national growth in their country. Moreover, they do not need to adopt an urban life in order to build a stable and promising future in the medium and long term.

TRANSLATION REQUIRED: We regret only a Google machine translation of this item is available in the Archive. Google translations only provide a gist of the remarks and, therefore, do NOT recommend quoting this text until a human translation is available. We would be very grateful if any of our readers, fluent in the original language, would be kind enough to translate the text. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

Google translation (with passages of official translation) — Click here for the original in French

Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim.

Excellencies,
Excellencies Ambassadors and Representatives of International Organisations,
Ladies and Gentlemen:

Assalamu alaikum.

I am very happy that this exhibition can be held in Burkina Faso, Burkina Faso because the projects that have received the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, each individually and all three together, are of paramount importance.

[Official translation] Architecture is the only art which has an impact on the quality of life of the people, which is why this award was created. One of its objectives, is effectively, to have a positive impact not only on the quality of the profession itself, but also on the quality of life of the Muslim communities whom we wished to serve.

When I established the Prize in 1977 and repeatedly thereafter, a major debate took place within the bodies of the prize, whether jury or “Steering Committees” to find if that price could be attributed to large projects that professional architects had never participated. It was found that the majority Muslim populations of the planet lived in rural areas and the majority of their habitat was built by the families themselves or by builders who had not received any education that the transition know-how from one generation to another.

Following this, the “Steering Committee” and juries have paid particular attention to rural housing and the fundamental question of how to secure and improve the habitat. Why use the word “secure” because, for example, the majority Muslims of our world today live in the most dangerous seismic zone of our land.

I am pleased that despite the great difficulties in identifying projects that could be considered exceptional and therefore best in a rural setting, between 1977 and 2008, the price has nevertheless managed to identify and to reward strong projects important for rural people. Too often, I think we forget that between 70 and 80% of the world Muslim population lives in rural areas.

These projects were very different from each other and the 3 winners of Burkina are characterised by inspiration, imagination and personal commitment of architects who have done everything necessary to create simple projects, easily constructible in rural areas and using local materials so easily replicated in similar contexts.

The Central Market Project Koudougou received support from the “Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation”. I am extremely pleased that in recent years, other international organisations providing development assistance in rural areas of the Muslim world apply, as did the Swiss organisation, to go beyond simply because of one major support economically. They shall see indeed that these projects are particularly relevant to the cultures of the Islamic world to the point that during the latest rounds of price, many of these projects were selected as outstanding accomplishments merit recognition through the award of Aga Khan.

This cultural sensitivity is particularly important for the integration of these modern projects can be the best in traditional environments in bringing new technologies, new architectures, and even new symbols, without engaging in a so far direction that would ensure that local communities would reject these initiatives as incompatible with their history and culture. I want to congratulate especially the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. “

[Official translation] The improvement of rural housing is obviously an important goal in the development process, first to improve the quality of life in rural populations, which are often the poorest in these countries, but also to pass on the message that, for a start, these people are not forgotten by those who support national growth in their country. Moreover, they do not need to adopt an urban life in order to build a stable and promising future in the medium and long term.

[Google translation] The Aga Khan Award for Architecture in fact aims to study, analyse and understand the dynamic of physical change in societies where Muslims live. He aspires to influence these companies for future generations to create, build and live in better environments while preserving cultural continuity in their physical environment.

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture in fact aims to study, analyse and understand the dynamic of physical change in societies where Muslims live. He aspires to influence these companies for future generations to create, build and live in better environments while preserving cultural continuity in their physical environment. Burkina Faso has a long history of collaboration with the Aga Khan Award for Architecture which was awarded in 1992, the Panafrican Institute of Development in Ouagadougou in 2004, the Gando primary school, and most recently in 2007, Central Market Koudougou.

All these projects have in common an intelligent use of appropriate technologies and innovative using the earth as a building material. It is essential to preserve both the knowledge that the use of traditional material. And that is why I am pleased that the technologies and traditions have known for twenty years a revival in this country and that the master builders, architects and bricklayers of Burkina Faso are now exporting their know-how across Africa .

I again congratulate the architects, municipal authorities, as well as national and international agencies involved in these projects which are present here today for their achievements and the exemplary value of architectural solutions and adequate they implemented and have contributed to improving the quality of life of people of Burkina Faso.

I congratulate all those in Burkina Faso that have contributed to these three successive victories.

Bravo!

Thank you.

Official French version

Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim.

Messieurs les Ministres,
Excellences Messieurs les Ambassadeurs et Représentants des Organisations Internationales,
Mesdames et Messieurs:

Assalamu alaikum.

Je suis profondément heureux que cette exposition puisse se tenir au Burkina Faso, parce que les projets burkinabés qui ont reçu le Prix Aga Khan d’Architecture, chacun individuellement et tous les trois ensemble, sont d’une importance capitale.

L’architecture est le seul art qui a un impact sur la qualité de vie des peuples et c’est la raison pour laquelle ce prix a été créé. L’un de ses objectifs est en effet d’avoir un impact positif non seulement sur la qualité de la profession elle-même, mais aussi sur la qualité de vie des communautés musulmanes auxquelles on a souhaité s’adresser.

Lorsque j’ai établi le Prix en 1977, et à de nombreuses reprises par la suite, un grand débat s’est déroulé au sein des organes du Prix, qu’il s’agisse du Jury ou des « Steering Committees », pour savoir si ce Prix pouvait être attribué à des projets de grande importance auxquels des architectes professionnels n’avaient jamais participé.

Il avait été constaté que la plus grande partie des populations musulmanes de notre planète vivaient dans des zones rurales et que la majorité de leur habitat était construit par les familles elles-mêmes ou par des bâtisseurs qui n’avaient reçu pour toute éducation que le passage d’un savoir-faire d’une génération à l’autre.

A la suite de ce constat, le « Steering Committee » et les jurys ont porté une attention toute particulière à l’habitat rural et à la question fondamentale de savoir comment sécuriser et améliorer cet habitat.

Pourquoi, j’utilise le mot « sécuriser» c’est parce que, par exemple, la majorité des musulmans de notre monde d’aujourd’hui vit dans la zone sismique la plus dangereuse de notre terre.

Je suis heureux que malgré les grandes difficultés à identifier des projets qui pouvaient être considérés comme étant exceptionnels et donc exemplaires dans un environnement rural, entre 1977 et 2008, le Prix ait néanmoins réussi à identifier et à primer des projets forts importants pour les populations rurales.

Trop souvent, je crois qu’on oublie qu’entre 70 et 80% de la population musulmane de ce monde vit dans des zones rurales.

Ces projets ont été très différents les uns des autres et les 3 lauréats du Burkina sont caractérisés par l’inspiration, l’imagination et l’engagement personnel d’architectes qui ont fait tout ce qui était nécessaire pour créer des projets simples, facilement constructibles en zone rurale tout en utilisant des matériaux locaux donc faciles à reproduire dans des contextes similaires.

Le Projet du Marché Central de Koudougou a reçu le soutien de la « Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation »

Je suis extrêmement heureux de constater que, ces dernières années, d’autres organisations internationales offrant de l’aide au développement dans les zones rurales du monde musulman, s’appliquent, comme l’a fait cette organisation helvétique, à aller au-delà du simple fait de soutenir économiquement un projet significatif. Elles veillent en effet à ce que ces projets soient particulièrement adaptés aux cultures du monde islamique au point qu’au cours des cycles plus récents du Prix, nombre de ces projets ont été retenus comme des réalisations exceptionnelles méritant une reconnaissance à travers l’attribution du Prix Aga Khan.

Cette sensibilité culturelle est un facteur particulièrement important pour que l’insertion de ces projets modernes puisse se faire au mieux dans des environnements traditionnels en y apportant de nouvelles techniques, de nouvelles architectures et même de nouveaux symboles, sans s’engager pour autant dans une direction qui ferait que les communautés locales rejetteraient ces initiatives comme étant incompatibles avec leur histoire et leur culture. Je tiens donc à féliciter tout particulièrement la « Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation ».

L’amélioration de l’habitat rural est évidemment un objectif important dans le processus de développement, d’abord pour améliorer la qualité de vie des populations rurales qui sont souvent les populations les plus pauvres de ces pays. Mais il s’agit également de faire passer le message que premièrement, ces populations ne sont pas oubliées de ceux qui soutiennent le développement national dans leur pays et que deuxièmement, elles ne doivent pas obligatoirement s’urbaniser pour se construire un avenir stable et prometteur, à moyen et à long terme.

Le Prix Aga Khan d’Architecture a en effet pour objectif d’étudier, d’analyser et de comprendre les dynamiques du changement physique dans les sociétés où vivent les musulmans. Il aspire à influer sur ces sociétés pour que les générations futures puissent créer, bâtir et vivre dans des environnements meilleurs tout en préservant une continuité culturelle dans leur environnement physique.

Le Burkina Faso a une longue histoire commune avec le Prix Aga Khan d’Architecture qui avait primé, en 1992, l’Institut Panafricain de Développement à Ouagadougou, en 2004, l’école primaire de Gando, et plus récemment, en 2007, le Marché Central de Koudougou.

Tous ces projets ont en commun une utilisation intelligente et innovatrice de technologies appropriées utilisant la terre comme matériau de construction. Il est essentiel de préserver tant ce savoir que l’utilisation de ce matériau traditionnel. Et c’est pourquoi je suis heureux de constater que ces technologies et ces traditions connaissent depuis vingt ans un renouveau dans ce pays et que les maîtres maçons, les architectes et les briquetiers du Burkina Faso exportent désormais leur savoir-faire à travers l’Afrique.

J’aimerais féliciter à nouveau les architectes, les autorités municipales, ainsi que les agences nationales et internationales impliqués dans ces projets qui sont présents ici aujourd’hui, pour leurs réalisations et pour la valeur exemplaire des solutions architecturales adéquates et adaptées qu’ils ont mises en œuvre et qui ont contribué à l’amélioration de la qualité de vie des populations du Burkina Faso.

Je félicite tous ceux au Burkina Faso qui ont contribué à ces 3 victoires successives.

Bravo!

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)