This project has made it possible to combine modern heritage conservation techniques with the processes and materials traditionally employed in the construction of mud brick buildings. The participation in the project of the few stone masons who still practise banco pourri has meant that more than 30 young people have been trained in this traditional technique, thus ensuring that is handed down to the next generation.

This is especially relevant in Mali where there is a danger that traditional artisans will gradually disappear, taking with them the skills and knowledge accumulated by previous generations of builders. Hence, restoring this important monument has provided the opportunity to perpetuate a tradition and also to ensure the future conservation of built heritage with appropriate techniques, competently applied….

[M]y fear is that urban modernisation will lead to an increase in property speculation and the uncontrolled development of tourist infrastructures which will eventually swallow up the mosques within the urban fabric.

Official English version — Click here for the official French version


Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim.

Mr. President,
Ministers,
Regional Governor,
Mr. Mayor,
Village chiefs and dignitaries of Komoguel, Imam of the Mosque.
Honoured guests,
Ladies and Gentlemen:

Assalamu alaikum.

Today I am pleased to be able to inaugurate the newly-restored Great Mosque of Mopti, also known as Komoguel Mosque, and to later visit the various projects currently underway to improve the environment in the historic district of Komoguel.

I should like to extend special thanks to the President of the Republic and the Minister for Territorial Administration and Local Community Affairs for their presence here today and for the support given by the government, regional authorities, the Mayor, Mr. Oumar Bathily, the town council, and the Komoguel Local Development Committee to this project.

The significance of this project extends far beyond the physical restoration of the architectural structure of the mosque.

The significance of this project extends far beyond the physical restoration of the architectural structure of the mosque. The history of the Ummah has reason to remember the prestige and influence of Mali ’s great mosques. At the height of the empire, in the eighth century, it was from these great seats of learning, these veritable centres of intellectual and spiritual activity, that Islam spread across Africa. It is therefore an immense privilege for me to be able to restore these magnificent mosques. Here in Mopti, and in Djenne or Timbuktu, the great tradition of mud brick building has been revived and the skills acquired can henceforth be put into practice in the construction of all mud brick buildings, whether intended for religious or secular purposes.

The work of revitalising the mosques is gradually being extended to their surrounding neighbourhoods to include all residential accommodation situated in the shadow of the minarets. How wonderfully symbolic it is that the outcome of efforts to restore the mosques should be to improve the quality of life of the people whose lives follow the same rhythm as theirs!

The restoration of the Great Mosque of Mopti is the result of close collaboration between the Ministry of Culture and the National Cultural Heritage Department (DNPC), the regional and local authorities, the Mosque Committee and the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, and of the dedication of numerous professionals and craftspeople from architects and conservation experts to stone masons, bricklayers, plasterers, metal workers, potters and electricians.

This project has made it possible to combine modern heritage conservation techniques with the processes and materials traditionally employed in the construction of mud brick buildings. The participation in the project of the few stone masons who still practise banco pourri has meant that more than 30 young people have been trained in this traditional technique, thus ensuring that is handed down to the next generation. This is especially relevant in Mali where there is a danger that traditional artisans will gradually disappear, taking with them the skills and knowledge accumulated by previous generations of builders. Hence, restoring this important monument has provided the opportunity to perpetuate a tradition and also to ensure the future conservation of built heritage with appropriate techniques, competently applied.

AKTC plans to [set up] a national list of mud brick structures, a move that is becoming increasingly urgent in view of the increasing deterioration of the country’s mud brick architectural heritage and the dangers it faces.

Many other buildings and villages constructed out of mud which may be less visible but are nonetheless significant in the context of the region are awaiting inspection and urgent protection and will require considerable cooperation on the part of national institutions and international organisations. It is encouraging to know that Mali has been selected to host this year’s international Terra conference on mud brick architecture. In the next few years, the AKTC plans to contribute to this international effort, not only by restoring important buildings but also, in cooperation with the Ministry of Culture, by setting up a national list of mud brick structures, a move that is becoming increasingly urgent in view of the increasing deterioration of the country’s mud brick architectural heritage and the dangers it faces.

In parallel to the restoration of the Great Mosque, the Trust has, in collaboration with Mopti’s local community and other AKDN agencies, launched a pilot project to improve the quality of life of people living in the immediate neighbourhoods, by responding to some of their most pressing needs. The AKTC’s initial commitment is to improve access to water and to an upgraded sewage network and to put in place social development, vocational training and micro-finance projects. While these environmental management programmes centering on the mosques are designed to ensure that the whole population will benefit from an improved quality of life, the work nevertheless forms part of a more global vision of urban development.

Sadly, we see that in many large Muslim cities, the minarets of our mosques, those towering symbols of our faith from the top of which the call to prayer rings out, are lost amid blocks of local authority housing, drowned out by the hubbub of the city.

Indeed, my fear is that urban modernisation will lead to an increase in property speculation and the uncontrolled development of tourist infrastructures which will eventually swallow up the mosques within the urban fabric. Sadly, we see that in many large Muslim cities, the minarets of our mosques, those towering symbols of our faith from the top of which the call to prayer rings out, are lost amid blocks of local authority housing, drowned out by the hubbub of the city.

My hope is that the regeneration of the areas around the mosques will mean the preservation and protection of the heritage of our glorious past which deserves our respect and admiration. And it is our duty as Muslims to contribute to and to encourage this effort, as the Holy Qu’ran reminds us by commanding us to leave the world in a better condition than that in which we received it, and instructing us to help one another in the performance of good works.

Thank you.

Official French version


Bismillah ir-Rahman ir-Rahim.

Excellence Monsieur le Président de la République,
Messieurs les Ministres,
Monsieur le Gouverneur de la Région de Mopti,
Monsieur le Maire de la Communauté Urbaine de Mopti,
Messieurs le Chef du village et les notables de Komoguel, l’Imam de la Mosquée,
Chers Invités,
Mesdames et Messieurs:

Assalamu alaikum.

Je suis extrêmement heureux de pouvoir inaugurer aujourd’hui la Grande Mosquée de Mopti dite de « Komoguel » nouvellement restaurée et de visiter tout à l’heure les divers travaux d’amélioration de l’environnement qui se poursuivent dans le quartier historique de Komoguel.

J’aimerais remercier tout particulièrement Monsieur le Président de la République et le Ministre de l’Administration Territoriale et des Collectivités Locales pour leur présence ici aujourd’hui et pour le soutien que le gouvernement, les autorités régionales et Monsieur le Maire Oumar Bathily et la municipalité, le Comité de la Mosquée ainsi que le Comité local pour le Développement de Komoguel ont apporté à ce projet.

Ce projet revêt une importance qui va bien au-delà de la réhabilitation matérielle de la structure architecturale de la mosquée.

L’histoire de la Ummah garde en effet en mémoire le prestige et le rayonnement des grandes mosquées du Mali. A l’apogée de l’empire, au 8ème siècle, c’est à partir de ces hauts lieux du savoir, véritables centres intellectuels et spirituels, que l’islam s’est propagé à travers l’Afrique. C’est donc un immense privilège pour moi de pouvoir restaurer ces magnifiques mosquées. Que ce soit ici à Mopti, à Djenné ou à Tombouctou, la grande tradition d’architecture en terre a été ravivée et les nouvelles compétences acquises pourront désormais être appliquées à toutes les constructions en terre, qu’elles soient destinées à la pratique de la foi ou à un usage profane.

Et cette œuvre de revitalisation des mosquées se déploie petit à petit aux quartiers alentour pour englober tout l’habitat situé à l’ombre des minarets. Quel magnifique symbole de voir que l’aboutissement de cet effort de réhabilitation des mosquées est l’amélioration de la qualité de vie des populations qui vivent à leur rythme !

La restauration de la Grande Mosquée de Mopti est le fruit d’une collaboration étroite entre le Ministère de la Culture et la Direction Nationale du Patrimoine Culturel (DNPC), les autorités régionales et locales, le Comité de la Mosquée et le Trust Aga Khan pour la culture, ainsi que de l’engagement dévoué de nombreux professionnels et artisans, qu’il s’agisse des architectes, des conservateurs, des maçons, des briquetiers, des crépisseurs, des ferronniers, des charpentiers, des potiers ou des électriciens.

Ce projet a permis de combiner les techniques modernes de préservation du patrimoine avec des procédés et des matériaux traditionnellement utilisés dans la construction d’ouvrages en terre. La contribution des quelques maçons qui maîtrisent encore la technique du banco pourri a également permis de former plus de 30 jeunes qui assureront la transmission de ce savoir-faire traditionnel à la génération suivante.

Ceci est particulièrement pertinent au Mali où les artisans traditionnels risquent de disparaître petit à petit, emportant à jamais avec eux le savoir-faire et les connaissances accumulées par les générations précédentes de bâtisseurs. Ainsi, la restauration de cet important monument a-t-elle été l’occasion de perpétuer une tradition et d’assurer également la conservation future du bâtiment avec des techniques appropriées, appliquées avec compétence.

De nombreux autres bâtiments et hameaux en terre du pays, qui sont sans doute moins visibles mais néanmoins significatifs dans le contexte de la région, attendent d’être inspectés et protégés d’urgence et vont requérir une large coopération d’institutions nationales et d’organisations internationales. C’est encourageant de savoir que le Mali a été sélectionné pour accueillir cette année la conférence internationale TERRA sur les constructions en terre. Dans les années à venir, l’AKTC projette de contribuer à cet effort international non seulement en restaurant des bâtiments importants, mais en établissant également, en collaboration avec le Ministère de la Culture, un inventaire national des structures en terre qui apparaît de plus en plus urgent au regard des multiples menaces et de la détérioration croissante du patrimoine en terre du pays.

Parallèlement à la restauration de la Grande Mosquée, le Trust a lancé, en collaboration avec la communauté urbaine de Mopti et d’autres agences de l’AKDN, un projet pilote pour améliorer la qualité de vie des habitants des quartiers environnants en répondant à quelques-uns de leurs besoins les plus pressants. L’engagement d’AKTC s’est d’abord concrétisé par l’amélioration de l’accès à l’eau et à un meilleur réseau sanitaire et la mise en place de projets de développement social, de , formation professionnelle et de micro-finance.

Si ces programmes de gestion de l’environnement autour des mosquées partent du principe que toute la population doit bénéficier de l’amélioration de sa qualité de vie, ce travail s’inscrit cependant dans une vision plus globale du développement urbain.

C’est en effet ma crainte que la modernisation de la ville entraîne une augmentation de la spéculation immobilière ou un développement incontrôlé des infrastructures touristiques qui finissent par engloutir les mosquées dans le tissu urbain. Nous constatons, hélas, dans nombre de métropoles de la Ummah, que les minarets de nos mosquées, symboles altiers de notre foi du haut desquels résonne le adhan, se sont perdus au milieu des barres de HLM et noyés dans le brouhaha de la ville.

Mon espoir est que la réhabilitation des quartiers autour des mosquées permette de préserver et de protéger cet héritage de notre glorieux passé qui mérite notre respect et notre admiration.

Et c’est notre devoir de musulmans de contribuer à cet effort et de l’encourager, comme nous le rappelle le Saint Coran en nous ordonnant de laisser le monde dans un état meilleur que celui dans lequel nous l’avons reçu et en nous enjoignant de nous entraider dans l’accomplissement des bonnes œuvres.

Merci

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)