[Google translation] It is necessary to constantly consider the relationship between the Ummah and the knowledge society. One realises that countries that have succeeded in reconciling both develop most quickly. On the other hand, those that reject or limit access to the knowledge society get left behind. My concept of Islam is a faith for all time, not backward looking.

In the Qur’an it is written that one must seek education to know Allah better, and share knowledge for the betterment of society. That is to say that in Islam, the links between faith and knowledge are very strong and we are constantly encouraged to learn. This is an extraordinary message for humanity.

TRANSLATION REQUIRED: We regret only a Google machine translation of this item is available in the Archive. Google translations only provide a gist of the remarks and, therefore, do NOT recommend quoting this text until a human translation is available. We would be very grateful if any of our readers, fluent in the original language, would be kind enough to translate the text. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

Interviewers: Eric Chol and Christian Makarian in Aiglemont

Unknown translator — Click here for the original in French

He is a secret man, a sacred figure. Descendant of the Prophet Muhammad through his cousin and son-in-law Ali, he is for 15 million Shia Ismailis the supreme Imam, the guardian of an orthodoxy sustained and transmitted by the same family for the past thirteen and a half centuries. With a smiling face, but firm in his faith, Karim Aga Khan speaks little, chooses his words and looks after the guidance of his followers by travelling to the most agitated regions of the world. Born in Geneva of an Indo-Italian father and an English mother, he is the image of a globalised prince and proponent of an Islam open to dialogue, oriented towards humanitarian action, engaged in sustainable development and the protection of minorities (see page 82). He is also known for his horses and his considerable fortune, which make of him a mythic personality of international high society. On the eve of his Golden Jubilee, Karim Aga Khan received L’Express exclusively at his residence of Aiglemont, north of Paris. He opened up with rare candour on Islam, the state of the world, his work for the less fortunate, and his notion of goodness.

Eric Chol/Christian Makarian: Amidst the intense agitation of the Muslim world, the Ismaili community seems to enjoy a certain peace. Is this due to your specific doctrine?

His Highness the Aga Khan: The Ismaili doctrine is a family within Shi’ism, because there are numerous forms of Shi’ism just as there exist several families among the Sunnis. And the commonality among the Shia is the role of Hazrat Ali [NDLR: the cousin and son-in-law of Prophet Muhammad]. He was the great intellectual force of his time. Because of him, Shi’ism is an intellectual interpretation of Islam. The direct impact is the reduction of conflict between the spiritual and the temporal. The other fundamental element resides in the personal spiritual search. The individual is perhaps more important for us than among the different Sunni traditions. Finally, the notion of authority plays an essential role. In the Shia faith, it was given to Hazrat Ali by the Prophet who specified before his death that he wished it to remain in his family.

EC/CM: How can one explain the tremendous opposition today between the Shias and the Sunnis, particularly in Iraq?

It was perfectly predictable that, from the moment Saddam Hussein was relieved in favour of a democratic consultation, there would be a new re-balancing between the two main branches of Islam. The external effect was even more predictable: once it was established that Iraq is a Shia majority, the surrounding countries would react in accordance with their affiliation

AK: All of the ongoing world conflicts have a religious component, whether it is Islam, Christianity or another religion. In Iraq, a Sunni minority held power in a majority Shia country, which was itself surrounded by Sunni nations. This is a dominant model in Islam, the only reverse case being Syria, where a Shia minority governs a majority Sunni population. It was perfectly predictable that, from the moment Saddam Hussein was relieved in favour of a democratic consultation, there would be a new re-balancing between the two main branches of Islam. The external effect was even more predictable: once it was established that Iraq is a Shia majority, the surrounding countries would react in accordance with their affiliation, and not in accordance with the process of democratisation. Alas, none of this surprised nor astonished me. The case of Afghanistan had proven it already: as soon as a Sunni majority found itself in a situation of extreme tension, the Shias were in danger. This is the case with the Hazara in Afghanistan, who are targets of assassination and fatwas. What is terrible is that the West seems to have only just discovered this reality, while we frequently alerted the entire world of this imminent, predictable risk.

EC/CM: What is surprising is that al-Qaeda which seemed to primarily target Westerners, has shown in the past months that the Shia constitute their main enemy.

AK: This is also not a surprise to me. Well before the invasion of Iraq, the principal watchword of al-Qaeda was to normatise Islam according to one fundamentalist Sunni interpretation. The exclusivist attitude is a form of theological colonialism, and it has spread throughout the whole of the Islamic world.

EC/CM: How do you explain the global rise of fundamentalism within the Muslim world?

We need to establish a clear differentiation between the Muslim faith and the political developments that we are witnessing today throughout the Muslim countries. I am not saying that Islam is absolutely absent from international tensions, but as a Muslim, I find it extremely difficult to conclude that there is a direct theological implication in the current context.

AK: I confess that I do not find myself very much at ease with the notion of [a single] “Muslim world.” Just as it is not possible to give a single face to the Christian or Jewish world, it is not possible to look at Islam as a single block. Muslims come from different cultures, regions and traditions. If you had to write the history of the Muslim people since 1948, what would you write? That the situation in the Middle East at the dawn of the third millennium is the result of a process born during the First World War, which succeeded in creating a theologically based state — that is the Jewish state.

Then you would say that decolonisation started in 1947 in the British Empire and it was offset by other problems, including that of Kashmir. Before adding that the Indian government confirmed that Muslims are a marginal community through the Sachar Committee report. You would be obligated to note that the Soviet Union attacked Afghanistan from whence came the current tragedy of the country. And finally, two Western nations decided to attack Iraq without [a mandate] from the UN. Would you conclude in writing this history that Muslim theological foundations were the determining factors? Honestly, I don’t think so. We need to establish a clear differentiation between the Muslim faith and the political developments that we are witnessing today throughout the Muslim countries. I am not saying that Islam is absolutely absent from international tensions, but as a Muslim, I find it extremely difficult to conclude that there is a direct theological implication in the current context.

EC/CM: Nevertheless, throughout the Muslim countries there exist specific tensions …

AK: Fundamentalism is a massive issue of inherited politics that is not based on theological foundations, but rather on historic, social and political factors that affect all societies whether they are Muslim or not. What is true is that in the present day, these factors are heavily concentrated throughout certain Muslim societies, creating a profound sentiment of frustration. Wave after wave, given the state of the world, the dominating sentiment is of an immense lassitude, of a real irritation. And the invasion of Iraq probably constitutes the last wave.

EC/CM: As the leader of the Ismaili community, you have always emphasised the development of social, economic and cultural activities not only for your followers, but for the benefit of all. What do you make of your development organisation?

AK: It needs to permanently adapt! The idea of development is comparable to a kaleidoscope: you twist it and see a new vision of the problems. It is up to you to draw conclusions for the short, medium or long term. That is why it is imperative that we adjust our network of agencies. These ones are the result of fifty years of analysis of the material development needs. Far from being the fruits of different development theories, they are rather conceived to be navigated based on lessons learned on the ground. Nobody in the 1950s or 1960s was thinking of micro-credit or culture. These activities are now part of our network, and I have no doubt that my successor will carry out [further] changes.

EC/CM: Would you consider your network to be a non-governmental organisation?

No, we function very differently [from NGOs]! We [are in it for the long run], whereas it is not rare to see an NGO start-up in a country and leave five days later…. Finally, we have placed culture at the heart of the development puzzle. Not long ago this idea might have sounded eccentric. In reality, culture is a remarkable engine for development …

AK: No, we function very differently! We [are in it for the long run], whereas it is not rare to see an NGO start-up in a country and leave five days later. Second difference, we work in the frame of a complete network, theoretically capable of bringing about appropriate responses in the majority of situations. Finally, we have placed culture at the heart of the development puzzle. Not long ago this idea might have sounded eccentric. In reality, culture is a remarkable engine for development, which we have already experimented with in Kabul, Cairo, Zanzibar and Delhi.

EC/CM: Another difference with the NGOs: you accept the idea of making profits …

AK: Exactly, with the condition that we distinguish between non-profit projects with an objective of reaching a break-even point to become self-sustaining and therefore independent, and others which must be profitable. As for the dividends, they are systematically reinvested in the Development Network.

EC/CM: This idea of profit-making is not normal in the world of development …

AK: It’s true! Often non-profit activities are considered charity. And this is a word that we do not like. Islam has a very clear message about the different forms of generosity. There is that with regard to the poor, which takes the form of gifts. But the recipient remains poor. There exists a second form of generosity that contributes to growing the independence of the person. This concept, in which the goal is to make the person the master of their destiny, is the most beneficial in the eyes of Allah.

EC/CM: What initiatives are you planning at the occasion of your jubilee?

Often this is analysed exclusively through the material angle. However we think it is comprised of a societal phenomenon, characterised by a lack of access to protection, to security, to healthcare or to education.

AK: With the leaders of the community, we are looking in two directions. First, to reinforce the institutions, whether these be Imamat or those of the Development Network. Then, to bring about a better balance in the distribution of our activities between different regions of the world and the communities. But for this we need to establish an exact diagnosis of poverty, a concept which is still poorly understood. Often this is analysed exclusively through the material angle. However we think it is comprised of a societal phenomenon, characterised by a lack of access to protection, to security, to healthcare or to education. If we establish the correct diagnosis — we are currently conducting an in depth study in five Asian countries — we will be able to put in place within two to three years a vast programme to fight poverty which will not be limited to the Ismaili community. Why not [sic?] for example, use new tools like micro-insurance, by extending it to fields as varied as security, education or health?

EC/CM: What are you expecting from your followers?

AK: A large part of the Ismaili community lives in the rural world, in countries such as Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Iran and India. Another part is established in the cities of North America and Western Europe. However the idea of a gift is very much anchored throughout the community: I would like therefore to use this opportunity of the Golden Jubilee to encourage knowledge transfers, not only gifts of money. We have already received a fantastic reaction from youth educated in the industrialised countries, who are ready to share their knowledge and to come and work throughout our institutions in the third-world for lengthier durations. These are fabulous gifts and they are also an act of faith. The ethic of Islam rests on this generosity.

EC/CM: You are therefore betting on knowledge to overcome misery?

AK: It is necessary to constantly consider the relationship between the Ummah and the knowledge society. One realises that countries that have succeeded in reconciling both develop most quickly. On the other hand, those that reject or limit access to the knowledge society get left behind. My concept of Islam is a faith for all time, not backward looking. In the Qur’an it is written that one must seek education to know Allah better, and share knowledge for the betterment of society. That is to say that in Islam, the links between faith and knowledge are very strong and we are constantly encouraged to learn. This is an extraordinary message for humanity.

Original transcript in French

C’est un homme secret, une figure sacrée. Descendant du prophète Mahomet, par le biais de son cousin et gendre Ali, il est pour 15 millions de chiites ismaïlis l’imam suprême, le gardien d’une orthodoxie détenue et transmise par la même famille depuis treize siècles et demi. Visage souriant mais ferme dans sa foi, Karim Aga Khan parle peu, choisit ses mots et veille à la bonne guidance de ses fidèles en parcourant les régions les plus agitées du monde. Né à Genève d’un père indo-italien et d’une mère anglaise, il est l’image même du prince mondialisé et incarne un islam ouvert au dialogue, tourné vers l’action humanitaire, engagé dans le développement durable et la protection des minorités (voir l’enquête page 82). On le connaît aussi pour ses chevaux et sa fortune considérable, qui font de lui un personnage mythique de la haute société internationale. A la veille de son jubilé d’or, Karim Aga Khan IV a reçu L’Express en exclusivité dans sa résidence d’Aiglemont, au nord de Paris. Sur l’islam, l’état du monde, l’action qu’il mène en faveur des déshérités, sa conception du bonheur, il s’ouvre avec une rare franchise.

Eric Chol/Christian Makarian: Dans l’intense agitation du monde islamique, la communauté ismaïlie semble jouir d’une certaine paix. Est-ce dû à la spécificité de votre doctrine?

AK: La doctrine ismaïlie est une famille du chiisme, car il y a de nombreuses formes de chiisme, comme il existe plusieurs familles parmi les sunnites. Or le point commun entre tous les chiites est le rôle de Hazrat Ali [NDLR: le cousin et le gendre du prophète Mahomet]. Il fut la grande force intellectuelle de son époque. Grâce à lui, le chiisme est une interprétation intellectuelle de l’islam. L’impact direct en est la réduction du conflit entre le spirituel et le temporel. L’autre élément fondamental réside dans la recherche personnelle de la spiritualité. L’individu est peut-être plus important chez nous que dans les différentes traditions sunnites. Enfin, la notion d’autorité joue un rôle essentiel. Selon la foi chiite, elle a été donnée à Hazrat Ali par le Prophète, qui a précisé, avant sa mort, qu’il souhaitait qu’elle demeure dans sa famille.

EC/CM: Comment expliquer aujourd’hui une si vive opposition entre chiites et sunnites, en particulier en Irak?

AK: Tous les conflits en cours dans le monde ont une composante religieuse, qu’il s’agisse de l’islam, du christianisme ou d’une autre religion. En Irak, une minorité sunnite détenait le pouvoir dans un pays à majorité chiite, lui-même environné de nations sunnites. C’est un modèle dominant dans l’Islam, le seul cas d’inversion étant la Syrie, où une minorité chiite gouverne un peuple majoritairement sunnite. Il était parfaitement prévisible que, à partir du moment où Saddam Hussein était destitué au profit d’une consultation démocratique, il y aurait une nouvelle donne entre les deux grandes branches de l’islam. L’effet externe était encore plus prévisible: une fois établi que l’Irak était à majorité chiite, les pays environnants allaient réagir en fonction de leur appartenance et non par rapport à un processus de démocratisation. Rien de tout cela, hélas, ne m’a surpris ni étonné. Le cas de l’Afghanistan le prouvait déjà: sitôt qu’une majorité sunnite se trouve en situation de tension extrême, les chiites sont en danger. C’est le cas des Hazara, en Afghanistan, qui font l’objet d’assassinats et de fatwas. Ce qui est terrible, c’est que l’Occident semble découvrir cette réalité, alors que nous avons alerté le monde entier, à de multi- ples reprises, sur ce risque éminemment prédictible.

EC/CM: Ce qui est surprenant, c’est qu’Al-Qaeda, qui semblait cibler surtout les Occidentaux, a montré depuis des mois que les chiites constituaient son principal ennemi.

AK: Ce n’est pas non plus une surprise pour moi. Bien avant l’invasion de l’Irak, le principal mot d’ordre d’Al-Qaeda était de normaliser l’islam selon une interprétation fondamentaliste sunnite. Cette attitude d’exclusion est une forme de colonialisme théologique et elle s’est répandue dans l’ensemble du monde islamique.

EC/CM: Comment expliquez-vous globalement la montée du fondamentalisme au sein du monde musulman?

AK: J’avoue que je ne me sens pas très à l’aise avec la notion de «monde musulman». Pas plus qu’il n’est possible de donner un seul visage au monde chrétien ou juif, il n’est pas possible de voir l’Islam comme un bloc. Les musulmans proviennent de cultures, de régions et de traditions différentes. Si vous deviez écrire l’histoire des peuples musulmans depuis 1948, qu’écririez-vous? Que la situation du Moyen-Orient à l’aube du IIIe millénaire est le résultat d’un processus, né pendant la Première Guerre mondiale, qui a abouti à la création d’un Etat sur des bases théologiques, c’est-à-dire l’Etat juif.

Puis vous diriez que la décolonisation a débuté en 1947 dans l’Empire britannique et qu’elle s’est soldée, entre autres problèmes, par celui du Cachemire. Avant d’ajouter que le gouvernement indien, à travers le rapport du comité Sachar, confirme que les musulmans sont une communauté marginale. Vous seriez obligé de préciser que l’Union soviétique a attaqué l’Afghanistan, d’où la tragédie actuelle de ce pays. Et, enfin, deux nations occidentales ont décidé d’attaquer l’Irak sans l’aval de l’ONU. Concluriez-vous, en écrivant cette histoire, que les fondements théologiques musulmans furent détermi-nants? Honnêtement, je ne le crois pas. Il faut établir clairement une différence entre la foi musulmane et les développements politiques auxquels nous assistons aujourd’hui au sein des pays musulmans. Je ne dis pas que l’islam soit absolument absent des tensions internationales, mais, en tant que musulman, je trouve qu’il est extrêmement difficile de conclure à une implication théologique directe dans le contexte actuel.

EC/CM: Tout de même, il existe au sein des pays musulmans des tensions spécifiques…

AK: Le fondamentalisme est issu d’un héritage politique très lourd qui repose non pas sur des bases théologiques, mais sur des facteurs historiques, sociaux, politiques qui affectent toutes les sociétés, qu’elles soient musulmanes ou non. Ce qui est vrai, c’est que, de nos jours, ces facteurs se trouvent fortement concentrés au sein de certaines sociétés musulmanes, provoquant un profond sentiment de frustration. Vague après vague, face à l’état du monde, le sentiment dominant est celui d’une immense lassitude, d’un réel agacement. Et l’invasion de l’Irak constitue probablement la dernière vague.

EC/CM: Justement, en tant que chef de la communauté ismaïlie, vous avez depuis toujours mis l’accent sur le développement des activités sociales, économiques et culturelles non pas seulement pour vos fidèles, mais au profit de tous. Quel bilan tirez-vous de votre organisation de développement?

AK: Elle doit s’adapter en permanence! L’idée du développement est semblable à un kaléidoscope: vous le secouez et vous obtenez une nouvelle vision des problèmes. A vous d’en tirer des conclusions, pour le court, le moyen ou le long terme. C’est pourquoi il est impératif d’ajuster notre réseau d’agences. Celles-ci sont le résultat de cinquante ans d’analyse des besoins en matière de développement. Loin d’être le fruit des différentes théories du développement, elles sont conçues pour être pilotées en fonction des leçons apprises du terrain. Personne, dans les années 1950 ou 1960, ne songeait au microcrédit ou à la culture. Ces activités font désormais partie de notre réseau, et nul doute que mon successeur procédera à des changements. Considérez-vous votre réseau comme une organisation non gouvernementale? Non, nous fonctionnons très différemment! Nous avons pour nous la durée, alors qu’il n’est pas rare de voir une ONG débarquer dans un pays et repartir cinq jours plus tard. Deuxième différence, nous travaillons dans le cadre d’un réseau complet, capable, théoriquement, d’apporter les réponses adéquates dans la plupart des situations. Enfin, nous avons placé la culture au coe; ur de la problématique du développement. Il n’y a pas si longtemps, cette idée pouvait sembler farfelue. En réalité, la culture est un moteur de développement remarquable, que nous avons déjà expérimenté à Kaboul, au Caire, à Zanzibar ou à Delhi.

EC/CM: Autre différence avec les ONG: vous acceptez l’idée de faire des profits…

AK: Exactement, à condition toutefois de distinguer les projets non lucratifs, auxquels nous fixons l’objectif d’atteindre leur seuil de rentabilité, pour devenir autosuffisants, et donc autonomes, et les autres, qui, eux, doivent être rentables. Quant aux bénéfices, ils sont systématiquement réinvestis dans le réseau de développement.

EC/CM: Cette idée de rentabilité n’est pas habituelle dans le monde du développement…

AK: C’est vrai! Souvent, on qualifie les activités non lucratives de charité. Or c’est un mot que nous n’aimons pas. L’islam a un message très clair sur les différentes formes de générosité. Il y a celle à l’égard des pauvres, qui se fait avec des dons. Mais la personne qui reçoit reste pauvre. Il existe une deuxième forme de générosité, contribuant à accroître l’autonomie de la personne. Ce concept, dont le but est de rendre à l’individu la maîtrise de sa destinée, est le plus bénéfique au regard d’Allah.

EC/CM: Quelles initiatives comptez-vous prendre à l’occasion de votre jubilé?

AK: Avec les responsables de la communauté, nous regardons dans deux directions. D’abord, renforcer les institutions, qu’il s’agisse de l’imamat ou du réseau de développement. Ensuite, parvenir à un meilleur équilibre dans la répartition de nos activités entre les différentes régions du monde et les communautés. Mais, pour cela, nous devons établir un diagnostic exact de la pauvreté, un concept encore très mal compris. Souvent, celle-ci n’est analysée qu’à travers l’angle matériel. Or nous pensons qu’il s’agit d’un phénomène sociétal, caractérisé par un manque d’accès à la protection, à la sécurité, aux soins ou à l’éducation… Si nous établissons le bon diagnostic – nous réalisons actuellement une étude en profondeur dans cinq pays d’Asie – nous pourrons mettre en place d’ici à deux ou trois ans un vaste programme de lutte contre la pauvreté qui ne se limitera pas à la communauté ismaïlie. Pourquoi, par exemple, ne pas utiliser de nouveaux outils, comme la microassurance, en l’étendant à des domaines aussi variés que la sécurité, l’éducation ou la santé?

EC/CM: Qu’attendez-vous de vos fidèles?

AK: Une grande partie de la communauté ismaïlie vit dans le monde rural dans les pays comme la Syrie, l’Afghanistan, le Pakistan, le Tadjikistan, l’Iran et l’Inde. Une autre partie s’est établie dans les villes d’Amérique du Nord et d’Europe de l’Ouest. Or l’idée du don est très ancrée au sein de la communauté: je veux donc utiliser cette opportunité du jubilé pour favoriser les transferts de connaissances, et pas seulement d’argent. Nous avons déjà enregistré une réaction fantastique de la part de jeunes gens éduqués dans les pays industrialisés, prêts à partager leur savoir et à venir travailler au sein de nos institutions dans le tiers-monde pendant des durées plus ou moins longues. Ces dons sont fabuleux, et ils sont aussi un acte de foi. L’éthique de l’islam repose sur cette générosité.

EC/CM: Vous faites donc le pari de la connaissance pour vaincre la misère?

AK: Il est nécessaire de s’interroger en permanence sur les relations entre l’umma [NDLR: la communauté des musulmans] et la société de la connaissance. On s’aperçoit que les pays ayant réussi à concilier les deux se développent le plus rapidement. En revanche, ceux qui rejettent ou limitent l’accès à la société de la connaissance restent à la traîne. Ma conception de l’islam est une foi pour toujours, et non tournée vers le passé. Dans le Coran, il est écrit qu’il faut rechercher l’éducation pour mieux connaître Allah, et partager notre connaissance pour l’amélioration de la société. C’est dire si, dans l’islam, les liens entre foi et connaissance sont très forts, et nous sommes encouragés en permanence à apprendre. Cela est un message extraordinaire pour l’humanité.

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)