The question that must be asked, I believe, is not whether democracy is a good thing in the abstract, but rather how to help democracy perform better in practice. Do we really know what is going wrong? And why? Do we know what corrective steps should be taken? And by whom? These are massive questions, and I do not claim to know the answers. But I do believe that significantly more thought must be given to these issues, by the intelligentsia of our world, yourselves included….

As history demonstrates, so-called backward places can move forward over time. It is not unrealistic to plan for progress…. One of the reasons that I am more optimistic than some about the future of the developing world is my faith that a host of new institutions can play a larger role in that future. I am especially enthusiastic about the potential of what I call “civil society”….

Bringing a new sense of peace and order to [the complex situation of Islamic-Western relations] will require great subtlety, patience, understanding and knowledge. Sadly, none, I repeat none, of these requirements are sufficiently available amongst the main players today. There is clumsiness, not subtlety, there is impatience, not patience, there is a massive deficit in understanding and an enormous knowledge vacuum.

Official English version — Click here for the official French version

Mr. Richard Descoings, Director of Sciences Po,
Directors and Faculty of the MPA Programme,
Graduating Students and their Families,
Ladies and Gentlemen:

It is a great honour to be with you today.

This is a memorable time for all of you who are graduating today — and for your friends and families. And it is also a special moment in the life of this School — the graduation of the first class to earn the new Master of Public Affairs degree.

The values which Sciences Po honours today are deeply rooted in its history — stretching back now over a century and a third a lot of people have been ahead of you. But the school’s hallmark is that it has always honoured the past by embracing the future. The Master of Public Affairs programme — especially its emphasis on international partnerships — is an ideal example of new innovation in the service of old ideals.

Among those ideals has been the principle of educating for leadership, but leadership based not on social standing or material resources but on intellectual merit. The founders of Sciences Po realised in their time that aristocracies of class must give way to aristocracies of talent…that is, to meritocracies. And the path to meritocracy in leadership is meritocracy in education.

Another value which Sciences Po has emphasised from the start is that of pluralism — an outlook which rises above parochial preoccupations. That outlook is reflected today in your strong international commitments, including your new Master of Public Affairs degree. I was impressed with this programme from the day I first learned that Sciences Po would join with Columbia University and the London School of Economics in its sponsorship. And my enthusiasm is reinforced as I look out at the global mix of your first graduating class. I wish I had the time to meet and talk to every one of you.

I had the opportunity to speak just a year and a month ago at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. I shared with that audience a definition I once heard of a good graduation speaker — they say it is someone who can talk in someone else’s sleep. I hope that we can break that pattern today.

Toward that end, I thought it might be helpful if I took up a question which may well be on many of your minds: Just who is the Aga Khan, anyway? And why is he here? In response, let me say first that I was born into a Muslim family, linked by heredity to Prophet Muhammad (May peace be upon him and his family). It was exactly fifty years ago that I became the 49th Imam of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims.

The ethics of Islam bridge the realms of faith on the one hand and practical life on the other: what we call Din and Duniya. Accordingly, my spiritual responsibilities for interpreting the faith are accompanied by a strong engagement in issues relating to the quality of life and well being. This latter commitment extends not only to the Ismaili community but also to those with whom they share their lives — locally, nationally and internationally.

One of the issues which has concerned me the most over these years has been the topic of education. My forefathers, as far back as a thousand years ago and as recently as a century ago, founded some of the great universities of the Muslim world, and I have continued in that tradition through a programme of Aga Khan Academies, a school system, and by establishing the Aga Khan University and the University of Central Asia. Against this background, you can understand why the success of your new programme is of such a great interest for me.

We hear a great deal these days about a clash of civilisations between the Islamic world and the West. I disagree profoundly. In my view, it is a clash of ignorance which we are facing. And the answer to ignorance is education. I should note that my own education has blended Islamic and Western traditions. My secondary and university schooling, in fact, was in Europe and in America. But my perspective over these last fifty years has also been profoundly shaped by the developing world.

The Ismailis currently reside — as minorities — in more than 25 countries, mostly in the developing world. For five decades, that has been my world, my virtually permanent preoccupation. During that time we have built a wide-ranging series of programmes involving these societies — in fields such as health care, education and culture, economic infrastructure and social development, the environment, the arts, and the media — coordinated through the Aga Khan Development Network.

Over this past half century, the pace of change on our planet has been bewildering. And that pace is accelerating. I was struck last month by the fact that the leadership of France, the U.K. and Germany had changed significantly in just a few months and similar changes are coming in the United States.

As the pace of history accelerates, developments that occurred over fifty years in my lifetime will happen in fifteen or even five years for your generation…. There is nothing we can do to slow the pace of change, but we can hope to help steer its direction.

As the pace of history accelerates, developments that occurred over fifty years in my lifetime will happen in fifteen or even five years for your generation. This is why I believe that the most important thing you could have mastered in the course of your studies — as you were becoming “Masters” of Public Affairs — was not any specific body of knowledge, but rather the ability to go on learning. There is nothing we can do to slow the pace of change, but we can hope to help steer its direction.

As we do so, there are three challenges in particular that I would like to highlight to you today. They are:

  • First, the future of democracy, especially in the developing world;
  • Secondly, the central role which civil society can play in that development;
  • And thirdly, the crisis in relations between the West and the Islamic world.

These are all areas which are going to affect the world in which you live in the decades ahead.

Future of democracy in the developing world

The history of democracy, especially in areas of Asia and Africa which I know well, has been a long series of jolts and jars. Today, any thoughtful observer of those regions would have to conclude that democracy has been losing popular confidence as an effective form of government. In many of these countries, governments, constitutions, parliaments, and political parties are little more than a dysfunctional assemblage of notional democratic vehicles. Elections are held, constitutions are validated, and international monitors issue their reports, but observing these forms of government is not the same thing as governing effectively.

[M]ost people would rather have a beneficent paternalistic dictator, provided he improved the quality of life, than a less effective, though duly elected, democratic leadership.

A recent survey by UNDP of 18 South American countries confirmed that the majority of people were less interested in their forms of government than in their quality of life. In simple terms, most people would rather have a beneficent paternalistic dictator, provided he improved the quality of life, than a less effective, though duly elected, democratic leadership.

The question that must be asked, I believe, is not whether democracy is a good thing in the abstract, but rather how to help democracy perform better in practice. Do we really know what is going wrong? And why? Do we know what corrective steps should be taken? And by whom? These are massive questions, and I do not claim to know the answers. But I do believe that significantly more thought must be given to these issues, by the intelligentsia of our world, yourselves included.

As we think about these questions, there are some hopeful signs. Generally speaking, the most successful developing countries are those which have engaged actively with the global knowledge society, those which have accepted and defended the value of pluralism, and those which have created an Enabling Environment for human enterprise, rather than indulging in asphyxiating policies which discourage human endeavour.

But in too many places, democratic practice is deeply flawed. One problem is simple ignorance of the various forms of democracy. I attribute this in part to the absence of good education in comparative government. Holding a national referendum on a new constitution, is no guarantee that the provisions of the constitution have been understood, let alone validated, by popular consent. In addition, the machinery of government — including the creation and funding of political parties, is often unguided and undisciplined, and widely open to manipulation and fraud. Nor is government performance monitored effectively — by internal processes or by the media.

Effective democracy can not be imposed from the top or from the outside. Democracy’s value must be deeply felt in the daily lives of a country’s population, including the rural majority …

Finally, the very concept of democracy must be adapted to a variety of national and cultural contexts. Effective democracy can not be imposed from the top or from the outside. Democracy’s value must be deeply felt in the daily lives of a country’s population, including the rural majority, if it is to be upheld and promoted.

Against this background, it would be wise, in my view, to prepare ourselves for a time of testing as far as democracy is concerned. We can expect a mix of successes, failures and disappointments, as well as a continuing array of governing arrangements: absolute monarchies, constitutional monarchies, single house or dual house parliaments, presidential and other systems, including numerous forms of federalism. In addition, regional groupings will increasingly play important roles. Does this picture mean continuing instability in parts of the developing world? May be.

But I have confidence that if we can ask the right questions about democracy, we will increasingly find the right answers. In this regard, the fact that history moves at an accelerating pace is both a challenge and an opportunity. I remember how people 50 years ago carelessly referred to many of the developing economies as hopeless “basket cases”, including places that have taken off since — like India and China. As history demonstrates, so-called backward places can move forward over time. It is not unrealistic to plan for progress. This brings me to my second major point.

The role civil society can play in development

One of the reasons that I am more optimistic than some about the future of the developing world is my faith that a host of new institutions can play a larger role in that future. I am especially enthusiastic about the potential of what I call “civil society”.

By civil society, I mean a set of institutions which are neither governmental nor commercial, organisations which are powered by private energies but designed to advance the public good. They work in fields such as education, health, science and research. They embrace professional, commercial, labour, ethnic and arts associations, and others devoted to religion, communication, and the environment. Many are targeted to fight poverty and social inequity.

Too often we have assumed that voluntary organisations are too limited to serve great public purposes. For some, the very notion of private organisations devoted to public goals seems to be an oxymoron. But this sceptical attitude is changing. The power of civil society is becoming more apparent — in your coursework here at Sciences Po among other places. This is all to the good — civil society should have a prominent place in the new equation for social progress, complementing rather than competing with government. And the same thing is true of the private business sector — and the potential for public-private partnerships.

Civil and private institutions have unique capacities for spurring social progress — even when governments falter. For one thing, because they are intimately connected to the warp and woof of daily life, they can predict new patterns with particular sensitivity.

Civil and private institutions have unique capacities for spurring social progress — even when governments falter. For one thing, because they are intimately connected to the warp and woof of daily life, they can predict new patterns with particular sensitivity. The development of civil society can also help meet the challenge of cultural diversity, giving diverse constituencies effective ways to express and preserve their distinct identities. Private institutions also provide good laboratories for experimentation. Because they are multiple in nature, they can try a variety of approaches, sometimes failing and sometimes succeeding, but always learning from their experiences. And because these institutions need not make short term accommodations to conventional wisdom or current fashions, they have greater freedom to be controversial — and creative. [Emphasis original]

The crisis in relations between the West and the Islamic world

Let me move then to my third topic, the crisis in relations between the West and the Islamic world. I cannot remember a time when these relations have been so strained, or so wide-sweeping in their impact — both across generations and across the world.

[W]e can deal effectively with this crisis, I believe, only if we begin by addressing a complex set of political issues, rather than worrying so much about a conflict of religions.

I am deeply convinced that the fundamental roots of this crisis are infinitely more political than they are theological. And we can deal effectively with this crisis, I believe, only if we begin by addressing a complex set of political issues, rather than worrying so much about a conflict of religions.

If you reflect back to the origins of the present flash points, the historical legacy has been consistently political — and frequently explosive. The present Middle East situation was born at the end of World War I, growing out of the search for a homeland for the Jewish peoples of our world. The Kashmir conflict was born out of the decolonisation process when Britain withdrew from the then-united India. More recently, the Russian invasion of Afghanistan and the British and American invasion of Iraq have further contributed to the turmoil.

But disputes among the three Abrahamic faiths themselves have not been responsible for these conflicts. Yes, many of the problems have since taken on the colouring of interfaith conflict, but that development is the consequence, much more than the cause, of these tragedies.

Political conflict, of course, has sometimes intensified theological forces which were once less conflictual, particularly in the Islamic world. Separations within Islam have become more visible, more irascible, and more difficult to address. Some such divisions, such as relations between Arab Muslims and non-Arab Muslims, or between various interpretations of Islam, have historical roots which are centuries old, and have been revived and fanned by political developments. But other cleavages, between the secular states and the theocracies of the Muslim world, for example, or between the ultra rich and the ultra poor, are essentially the products of modern times — at least in their scope and scale.

Three observations are critical here.

  • First, there really is no one single Islamic world, but a variety of individual situations which need individual analysis.
  • Second, the faith of Islam, in the vast majority of its interpretations, is not in conflict with the other great Abrahamic traditions.
  • Third, each crisis we encounter stems from its own specific political context.

Bringing a new sense of peace and order to this complex situation will require great subtlety, patience, understanding and knowledge. Sadly, none, I repeat none, of these requirements are sufficiently available amongst the main players today. There is clumsiness, not subtlety, there is impatience, not patience, there is a massive deficit in understanding and an enormous knowledge vacuum.

Too often, there is also a tendency to run away from unpleasant truths. But we will not ameliorate these conflicts unless we address the underlying conditions — especially when economic despair leads to radicalisation. It has taken 50 years, and the publication of the Sachar Committee Report, to acknowledge that the Muslims of India are second class citizens. But is the same thing not also true of the Muslims of Mindanao? It is perhaps understandable that any religious grouping which has been marginalised economically will see itself as being victimised. But our priority should not be to sharpen religious distinctions but to address human suffering.

Let me also comment on the sharpening of cultural conflict within Western societies.

[G]eography as a cushion between cultures has been diminishing in recent years. The communications revolution has meant “the death of distance”. More than that, cultures are now mixing physically to an extent that would once have seemed impossible.

The past few years have been a dispiriting time in Europe — in part because of what many describe as a clash of civilisations in Europe’s midst, triggered by the rapid growth of minority populations. Perhaps, under a revitalised leadership, Europe can lead the world in meeting that challenge. But it will not be easy. Cultural conflict in the past was often mitigated by the fact that sharp cultural distinctions were muffled by geographic distance. But geography as a cushion between cultures has been diminishing in recent years. The communications revolution has meant “the death of distance”. More than that, cultures are now mixing physically to an extent that would once have seemed impossible.

Economic globalisation contributes to the trend. Some 45 million young people enter the job market in the developing world each year — but there are not enough jobs at home for many of them. Immigrants now account for two thirds of the population growth in the 30 member countries of the OECD. Some 150 million legal immigrants now live outside their native countries, joined by uncounted millions of illegal immigrants. Remittances sent home by immigrants total some $145 billion a year — and generate twice that amount in economic activity. The economic forces that propel immigration are far more powerful and relentless, I believe, than most people understand. They will not readily or easily be reversed or impeded.

As once homogeneous societies become distinctly multi-cultural, the rhythms, colours and flavours of host communities change, inspiring some, but frightening others. More than half of the respondents in recent European opinion polls have expressed a negative view of immigration.

The frequent result of all these factors has been marginalisation — socially and economically — for many minorities. And we need not look very far to see the evidence. To be sure, the victims of marginalisation in our world can be found on the floodplains of Bangladesh, the village streets of Uganda, and the teeming neighbourhoods of Cairo. But they can also be found in the banlieu of Paris. The “Clash of Civilisations” is both a local and a global problem.

One of the great stumbling blocks to the advance of pluralism, in my view, is simple human arrogance.

The world is becoming more pluralist in fact — but not in spirit. “Cosmopolitan” social patterns have not yet been matched by what I would call “a cosmopolitan ethic”. One of the great stumbling blocks to the advance of pluralism, in my view, is simple human arrogance. All of the world’s great religions warn against self-righteousness — yet too many are still tempted to play God themselves — rather than recognising their humility before the Divine.

A central element in a truly religious outlook, it seems to me, is a recognition that we all have a great deal to learn from one another. The Holy Qur’an speaks of how mankind has been created by a single Creator “from a single soul…”…a profound affirmation of the unity of humanity. This Islamic ideal, of course, is shared by other great religions. Despite the long history of religious conflict, there is also a long counter-history of religious tolerance.

Instead of shouting at one another, our faiths ask us to listen — and learn from one another. As we do, one of our first lessons might well centre on those powerful but often neglected chapters in history when Islamic and European cultures interacted cooperatively and creatively to realise some of civilisation’s peak achievements.

The spirit of pluralism is not a pallid religious compromise. It is a sacred religious imperative. In this light, our differences can become sources of enrichment, so that we see “the other” as an opportunity and a blessing — whether “the other” lives across the street — or across the world.

Having looked then at the challenges of democracy, the opportunities for civil society, and the nature of our cultural divides, let me return to a point I made earlier — the acceleration of history, the danger of further drift, and the need to master change. Who is it, I would ask in closing, who is best positioned to pursue such mastery? Among those who inherit this obligation and this opportunity, I would suggest, are you who are graduating this week from one of the world’s most advanced university programmes, with a title which tells us that you are, each one of you, a “Master of Public Affairs”.

As you graduate, you have my warmest congratulations on all you have accomplished so far, and my prayer that God may be with you, inspiring you and empowering you, in all the good things you will be doing in the days ahead.

Thank you.

Official French version

Monsieur Richard Descoings, Directeur de Sciences Po,
Mesdames et Messieurs les membres de la direction,
les enseignants et les étudiants du MPA,
Mesdames et Messieurs:

C’est un grand honneur pour moi d’être parmi vous aujourd’hui.

Cette journée mémorable pour vous qui recevez votre diplôme — comme pour vos proches — constitue également un événement pour Sciences Po, puisque vous représentez la toute première promotion du nouveau Master of Public Affairs.

Les valeurs mises à l’honneur aujourd’hui remontent aux origines mêmes de Sciences Po, il y a 135 ans, et vous avez de nombreux prédécesseurs. Cette institution a, en effet, toujours su rester fidèle au passé tout en embrassant l’avenir. Le Master of Public Affairs — notamment par la place qu’y occupe le partenariat international — est l’exemple même d’une formation novatrice au service d’idéaux pérennes.

Parmi ces idéaux, il en est un qui consiste à former les futurs dirigeants en se fondant non pas sur des critères de classe ou de richesse, mais sur le mérite intellectuel.

Les fondateurs de Sciences Po ont compris qu’à l’aristocratie de classe devait succéder une aristocratie de talent — en d’autres termes une méritocratie. Or, pour établir une méritocratie dans les affaires publiques, il faut d’abord un projet éducatif fondé sur la méritocratie.

Dès sa création, Sciences Po a également privilégié le pluralisme — valeur qui permet de s’élever au-dessus des intérêts particuliers. On en trouve l’écho aujourd’hui dans ses engagements internationaux — dont ce nouveau Master of Public Affairs.

J’ai été impressionné par cette formation aux affaires publiques en apprenant qu’elle était conduite en partenariat avec la Columbia University à New York et la London School of Economics. Et je redouble d’enthousiasme en constatant la diversité d’origines de cette première promotion. J’aurais aimé pouvoir m’entretenir avec chacun d’entre vous.

Comme je l’ai rappelé, l’an dernier à cette époque, lors du discours que j’ai prononcé à la School of International and Public Affairs de Columbia University, on dit parfois qu’un bon orateur est quelqu’un qui sait parler dans le sommeil de son auditoire.

J’ose espérer que ce ne sera pas le cas aujourd’hui.

En effet, je me suis dit qu’il serait peut-être utile de répondre ici à une question que nombre d’entre vous se posent peut-être : qui est l’Aga Khan ? et pourquoi est-il ici aujourd’hui ?

Pour commencer, je répondrai que je suis né dans une famille musulmane, issue du prophète Muhammad (que la paix soit sur lui et les siens). Il y a cinquante ans exactement, je suis devenu le 49 e imam des musulmans chiites imamites ismailis.

L’éthique de l’Islam établit un lien entre, d’une part, la vie spirituelle et, d’autre part, la vie matérielle — Din et Duniya. Aussi mes responsabilités de chef spirituel et d’interprète de la foi vont-elles de pair avec un profond engagement dans l’action en faveur de l’amélioration des conditions et de la qualité de vie. Et cette action ne se limite pas à la communauté ismailie, elle concerne tous ceux qui partagent leur vie — à l’échelle locale, nationale et internationale.

L’une des questions qui me préoccupe le plus depuis plusieurs années est celle de l’éducation.

Mes ancêtres, il y a mille ans et même encore au siècle dernier, ont fondé quelques unes des grandes universités du monde musulman. J’ai continué cette tradition avec la mise en place des Académies Aga Khan ainsi que la création de l’Université Aga Khan et de l’Université d’Asie centrale.

Dans ces conditions, vous comprendrez pourquoi le succès de ce nouveau Master m’intéresse au plus haut point.

On parle souvent aujourd’hui de « conflit de civilisation » entre l’Islam et l’Occident. Je suis en profond désaccord sur l’existence d’un tel conflit. Je pense plutôt que nous nous trouvons devant un conflit d’ignorance. Et ce qui sert à combattre l’ignorance, c’est l’éducation.

Je dois préciser que personnellement j’ai été élevé à la fois dans la tradition musulmane et dans la tradition occidentale. J’ai fait mes études secondaires et universitaires en Europe et aux États-Unis. Mais depuis cinquante ans, le monde en développement influe profondément sur ma vision du monde.

Les ismailis sont installés actuellement — de façon minoritaire — dans plus de 25 pays, dont la plupart sont en voie de développement. Depuis cinquante ans, le monde en développement est pour moi une préoccupation quasi constante. Au cours de ces cinq décennies, le Réseau Aga Khan de développement (Aga Khan Development Network) a coordonné la mise en place, avec la participation active des populations concernées, de tout un éventail de programmes concernent tant la santé, l’éducation et la culture que l’infrastructure économique, le développement social, l’environnement, l’art et les médias.

Au cours du demi-siècle écoulé, la planète a évolué à un rythme stupéfiant. Et ce rythme ne fait que s’accélérer. Ainsi, je suis frappé de voir que la France, le Royaume-Uni et l’Allemagne ont changé de dirigeants en l’espace de quelques mois seulement — de même les États-Unis connaîtront bientôt des changements similaires.

L’accélération de l’histoire est telle que les développements qui, de mon vivant, ont mis cinquante ans pour se mettre en place, se feront en quinze, voire cinq ans, pour votre génération. C’est pourquoi je suis convaincu que ce que vous aurez acquis de plus important dans le cadre de ce Master of Public Affairs, ce n’est pas un ensemble de connaissances précises mais plutôt la capacité de continuer à apprendre.

On ne peut rien faire pour ralentir les évolutions, mais on peut espérer contribuer à les orienter.

Il y a trois grandes questions dont j’aimerais souligner tout particulièrement l’importance aujourd’hui. D’abord l’avenir de la démocratie, surtout dans le monde en développement ; ensuite, le rôle clé de la société civile dans ce développement ; et enfin la crise des relations entre l’Occident et l’Islam. Ces questions affecteront le monde dans lequel nous vivons au cours des décennies à venir.

L’histoire de la démocratie, surtout dans les pays d’Asie et d’Afrique que je connais bien, est une longue succession de faux départs. Aujourd’hui, tout observateur attentif est bien obligé de conclure que l’efficacité de la démocratie en tant que système de gouvernement ne bénéficie plus de la confiance du public dans ces régions du monde.

Dans nombre de ces pays, les gouvernements, les constitutions, les Parlements et les partis politiques ne sont guère qu’un ensemble dysfonctionnel de vagues mécanismes démocratiques. Des élections y sont tenues, des constitutions sont entérinées, et des observateurs internationaux publient leurs rapports, mais respecter ces formes de gouvernement et gouverner de manière effective sont deux choses différentes.

Une étude récente du Programme des Nations unies pour le développement (PNUD) portant sur 18 pays d’Amérique du Sud confirme que la majorité des gens s’intéressent moins à leur système de gouvernement qu’à leurs conditions de vie. Autrement dit, la plupart d’entre eux préfèreraient un dictateur paternaliste, pourvu qu’il améliore la qualité de la vie, à des dirigeants démocrates, moins efficaces, mais élus en bonne et due forme.

Il ne s’agit pas, me semble-t-il, de savoir si la démocratie est une bonne chose dans l’abstrait, mais plutôt de s’interroger sur la manière dont on peut aider la démocratie à mieux fonctionner en pratique. Comprenons-nous vraiment la nature des difficultés ? Et les causes ? Savons-nous comment y remédier ? Et qui doit le faire ?

Ce sont là d’énormes problèmes, dont je ne prétends pas connaître la solution. Mais je suis convaincu qu’ils méritent une réflexion bien plus poussée de la part de l’intelligentsia de notre monde, vous compris.

Tandis que la réflexion se poursuit, certains signes encourageants apparaissent. En général, les pays en développement qui réussissent le mieux sont ceux qui jouent un rôle actif dans la société des connaissances à l’échelle mondiale, qui ont accepté et défendu le pluralisme, et qui ont créé un environnement favorable à l’esprit d’entreprise, plutôt que de se lancer dans des politiques qui étouffent l’homme et découragent l’effort.

Dans trop de pays, les pratiques démocratiques restent profondément imparfaites. Cela tient tout simplement à une méconnaissance des différentes formes de démocratie. J’attribue cela en partie à une éducation insuffisante en matière de gouvernement comparé. Faire approuver une nouvelle constitution par référendum n’assure pas une compréhension de ses articles et encore moins un soutien populaire.

Ajoutons à cela que les affaires publiques — y compris la création et le financement des partis politiques — sont souvent conduites de manière anarchique et laissent la porte ouverte à la manipulation et à la fraude. Les politiques gouvernementales ne font pas, non plus, l’objet d’une véritable évaluation — soit interne soit par les médias.

Enfin, le concept même de démocratie doit être adapté aux différents contextes nationaux et culturels. Pour être effective, la démocratie ne doit pas être imposée par le haut ou de l’extérieur. Et si l’on veut que la démocratie soit défendue et développée, il faut qu’elle soit intimement ressentie, au quotidien, comme une valeur positive par l’ensemble des habitants d’un pays, y compris la population rurale majoritaire.

Dans ces conditions, il serait sage, de mon point de vue, de se préparer à une période de mise à l’épreuve de la démocratie. Il faut s’attendre à un mélange de réussites, d’échecs et de déceptions, et à voir une grande diversité de régimes se maintenir : monarchie absolue, monarchie constitutionnelle, Parlement à une ou deux chambres, système présidentiel ou autre, dont maintes formes de fédéralisme. Les alliances régionales auront, par ailleurs, un rôle toujours plus important à jouer.

Cela signifie-t-il que certaines régions du monde en développement continueront à vivre dans l’instabilité ? C’est possible.

Mais je n’en continue pas moins de croire que si l’on pose les bonnes questions concernant la démocratie, on découvrira davantage de bonnes réponses.

À cet égard, le fait que l’histoire s’accélère est à la fois un défi et un atout. Je me souviens qu’il y a 50 ans, les gens qualifiaient négligemment les économies en développement — y compris l’Inde et la Chine — de « cas désespérés ».

Or l’histoire montre que les pays soi-disant arriérés peuvent fort bien avancer si on leur en donne le temps. Il n’est pas irréaliste de se préparer à un avenir meilleur.

Ce qui m’amène à mon second point. Si je suis plus optimiste que bien d’autres quant à l’avenir du monde en développement, c’est que je suis intimement persuadé de l’importance du rôle à venir de tout un ensemble d’institutions nouvelles. Je crois avec un enthousiasme tout particulier au potentiel de ce que j’appelle la « société civile ».

Par « société civile », j’entends un ensemble d’organisations, ni gouvernementales ni commerciales, nées de l’initiative privée mais destinées à améliorer le sort de tous. Ces institutions interviennent dans différents domaines — éducation, santé, science, recherche — et œuvrent de concert avec les associations professionnelles ou commerciales, les syndicats et les organismes culturels ainsi que d’autres organisations axées sur la religion, la communication et l’environnement. Nombre de ces institutions se consacrent à la lutte contre la pauvreté et les inégalités sociales.

Trop souvent, nous avons pensé que les organisations bénévoles n’ont pas l’envergure nécessaire pour servir les grandes causes publiques. Pour certains, les notions d’organisation privée et d’objectifs publics sont antinomiques.

Mais ce scepticisme évolue. La puissance de la société civile est de plus en plus visible — comme en témoigne, entre autres, votre programme d’études à Sciences Po. Il y a de quoi s’en réjouir — la société civile devrait jouer un rôle prépondérant dans la nouvelle donne et œuvrer au progrès social en partenariat plutôt qu’en concurrence avec les gouvernements. Il en est de même pour les entreprises du secteur privé et les partenariats public-privé.

Les institutions civiles et privées sont, plus que quiconque, en mesure de promouvoir le progrès social — même lorsque les gouvernements vacillent. Du fait qu’elles s’intègrent dans le tissu même de la vie quotidienne des habitants, elles sont capables de prévoir les nouvelles tendances avec une remarquable subtilité.

Le développement de la société civile peut contribuer à relever le défi de la diversité culturelle en donnant à des communautés différentes les moyens effectifs d’exprimer et de préserver leur identité.

Les institutions privées aussi sont particulièrement aptes à servir de laboratoires. Leur pluralité même leur permet de tenter différentes approches, parfois avec succès, parfois non, mais jamais sans tirer leçon de l’expérience. Et comme elles ne s’inscrivent pas dans le court terme et n’ont pas à tenir compte des idées reçues et des modes, elles ne craignent pas la controverse et sont libres de leur créativité.

J’en viens maintenant à mon dernier point : la crise des relations entre l’Occident et le monde islamique. Autant que je me souvienne, ces relations n’ont jamais été aussi tendues ni eu des conséquences d’une telle ampleur entre générations et à travers le monde.

Je suis profondément convaincu que cette crise a des racines infiniment plus politiques que théologiques. Et pour faire face efficacement à la crise, il convient, je crois, de porter avant tout un regard politique sur ces questions complexes, plutôt que de se laisser obnubiler par leur aspect religieux.

Lorsqu’on remonte aux origines des affrontements actuels, on s’aperçoit qu’elles sont toujours politiques — et fréquemment explosives. La situation actuelle au Moyen-Orient est née à la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale, de la recherche d’une patrie pour les peuples juifs. Le conflit au Cachemire est la conséquence du processus de décolonisation au moment où la Grande-Bretagne s’est retirée de l’Inde alors unifiée. Plus récemment, l’invasion par les Russes de l’Afghanistan et celle de l’Irak par les Britanniques et les Américains ont contribué encore davantage à la déstabilisation de la région.

Cependant, les différends qui opposent les trois religions abrahamiques ne sont pas responsables de ces affrontements. Nombre de situations ont pris l’allure de conflits religieux, certes ; mais c’est là une des conséquences, bien plus que la cause, de ces tragédies.

Les désaccords politiques ont, bien sûr, parfois intensifié les pressions théologiques, qui n’ont pourtant pas toujours été aussi antagonistes, surtout dans le monde musulman. Les tensions au sein de l’Islam s’en sont trouvées accentuées, exacerbées et plus difficiles à régler. Certains clivages, comme celui qui oppose les musulmans arabes et les musulmans non arabes, ou encore entre les différentes interprétations de l’Islam, ont des racines historiques vieilles de plusieurs siècles ; ce sont les développements politiques qui ont ravivé et enflammé les tensions. D’autres clivages, entre les États laïcs et les théocraties du monde musulman par exemple, ou encore entre les plus riches et les plus pauvres, sont essentiellement le produit de l’ère moderne — ne serait-ce que par leur envergure.

Trois remarques s’imposent ici. D’abord, le monde musulman n’est pas un et indivisible ; il est multiple, chaque situation spécifique exigeant une analyse spécifique. Ensuite, la foi musulmane est, dans la vaste majorité de ses interprétations, nullement en conflit avec les autres grandes traditions abrahamiques. Enfin, chaque situation de crise s’inscrit dans un contexte politique particulier.

Créer les conditions de la paix dans une situation d’une telle complexité exige beaucoup de tact, de patience, de compréhension et de connaissances. Malheureusement, aucune de ces qualités — je répète : aucune — n’est suffisamment présente chez les principaux acteurs actuels. Là où il faudrait du tact, on ne trouve que maladresse ; là où la patience est de mise, il n’y a qu’impatience ; et, en termes de compréhension et de connaissances, les déficiences sont énormes.

Trop souvent, on refuse de se confronter aux vérités désagréables. Impossible pourtant de régler ces conflits sans tenir compte des conditions sous-jacentes — et tout particulièrement du désespoir économique qui conduit à la radicalisation. Il a fallu attendre une cinquantaine d’années et la publication du rapport du comité Sachar pour qu’on admette les discriminations dont sont victimes les musulmans indiens. Mais les musulmans de Mindanao aux Philippines n’en subissent-ils pas de semblables ? Il est peut-être compréhensible que tout groupe religieux souffrant d’une marginalisation économique puisse se sentir victimisé. Mais nous devons avoir pour priorité non pas d’exacerber les différences religieuses mais de remédier à la souffrance humaine.

Permettez-moi également quelques remarques sur l’aggravation des conflits culturels au sein des sociétés occidentales.

Ces dernières années ont eu de quoi attrister l’Europe — en raison notamment du soi-disant « conflit de civilisation » provoqué en son sein par l’accroissement rapide des minorités. L’arrivée de nouveaux dirigeants permettra peut-être à l’Europe de relever ce défi et de montrer la voie au reste du monde. Mais ce ne sera pas facile.

Fut un temps, les distances géographiques rendaient les différences culturelles moins sensibles et atténuaient souvent les conflits culturels.

Mais l’éloignement géographique, qui amortissait les chocs entre cultures, s’amenuise depuis quelques années. La révolution des communications a « tué » les distances. De plus, les cultures se côtoient de manière beaucoup plus importante qu’on ne l’aurait cru possible par le passé.

La mondialisation ne fait que renforcer cette tendance. Quelque 45 millions de jeunes se présentent chaque année sur le marché du travail dans le monde en développement — or, dans bien des cas, il n’y a pas assez d’emplois pour eux dans leur pays d’origine. L’immigration représente aujourd’hui les deux tiers de la croissance démographique dans les 30 pays membres de l’OCDE. Quelque 150 millions d’immigrés vivent aujourd’hui en toute légalité loin de leur terre natale, sans compter les millions de clandestins. Les sommes envoyées au pays par ces expatriés représentent quelque 145 milliards de dollars U.S. par an — et génèrent le double en termes d’activité économique.

La logique économique qui pousse à l’immigration est beaucoup plus puissante et implacable, me semble-t-il, que ne le croient la plupart des gens. D’où les difficultés à enrayer ou à inverser la tendance.

Au fur et à mesure que les sociétés qui étaient restées culturellement homogènes se transforment en sociétés pluriculturelles, les rythmes, les couleurs, les saveurs des communautés d’accueil évoluent. Certains s’en réjouissent, d’autres s’en effraient. Plus de la moitié des personnes interrogées lors de récents sondages en Europe a une vision négative de l’immigration.

Ce qui résulte de tout cela le plus souvent, c’est la marginalisation — sociale et économique — de nombreuses minorités. Inutile d’aller très loin pour le constater. Ces marginalisés, on les trouve bien sûr dans les plaines inondables du Bangladesh, les ruelles des villages ougandais et les bidonvilles du Caire. Mais on les trouve aussi dans les banlieues de Paris.

Le « choc des civilisations » est un problème à la fois local et planétaire.

Le pluralisme existe dans les faits — mais pas dans les têtes. Nous vivons dans des sociétés « cosmopolites » encore dépourvues de ce que j’appellerais une « éthique cosmopolite ».

Une des principales entraves au développement du pluralisme est tout simplement l’arrogance humaine, à mon avis. Toutes les grandes religions du monde nous préviennent contre l’orgueil — pourtant beaucoup sont encore tentés de vouloir jouer à Dieu au lieu de faire preuve d’humilité face au divin.

Une des composantes fondamentales de toute vision véritablement religieuse du monde est, me semble-t-il, la conviction que nous avons tous beaucoup à apprendre les uns des autres.

Le Saint Coran enseigne que tous les êtres humains ont été créés par un même Créateur, « d’une seule âme » … affirmation profonde de l’unité de l’humanité.

Cet enseignement de l’Islam est, bien sûr, un idéal partagé par toutes les autres grandes religions. À l’histoire des conflits religieux répond celle, tout aussi longue, de la tolérance religieuse.

Au lieu de vous invectiver, soyez à l’écoute et apprenez les uns des autres — voilà ce à quoi nous invitent nos religions respectives. En ce sens, l’une des premières leçons à découvrir concerne les grands chapitres souvent négligés de l’histoire qui ont vu naître, grâce à la collaboration active et créatrice des musulmans et des chrétiens, certaines des plus grandes réalisations de l’humanité.

La défense du pluralisme n’est pas un pâle compromis. C’est un impératif sacré. Vue sous cet angle, la différence devient source d’enrichissement et l’« autre » représente à la fois une opportunité et une bénédiction — que cet « autre » habite de l’autre côté de la rue ou de l’autre côté de la planète.

Après avoir évoqué les difficultés que rencontre la démocratie, les opportunités qu’offre la société civile et la nature des conflits culturels, j’aimerais — si vous le voulez bien — revenir à mes remarques précédentes concernant l’accélération de l’histoire, le risque de nouvelles dérives et le besoin de maîtriser le changement.

La question que je soulèverai pour conclure est la suivante : qui est le mieux placé pour tenter de maîtriser ce changement ? Vous êtes, à mon avis, de ceux à qui incombe cette responsabilité et cette chance, vous qui, à l’issue d’un programmes d’études comptant parmi les meilleurs du monde, avez obtenu cette semaine un diplôme qui fait de vous des « Maîtres » en affaires publiques.

Alors que vous recevez ce diplôme, je tiens à vous présenter mes plus chaleureuses félicitations. Je prie Dieu qu’il vous accompagne, vous inspire et vous donne les moyens de réussir dans tout ce que vous entreprendrez de meilleur.

Merci de votre attention.

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)