From what I can see [in Afghanistan], I would sense immense relief. Relief after decades of conflict, of poverty, of extremism and these are people who are tired and they are looking for a new future. And I think that is the greatest sense I have of what’s happening and it’s upto the international community, the Afghans, organisations such as mine, to turn this fatigue into a process of hope.

ENGLISH TRANSLATION FROM FOREIGN LANGUAGE: We believe this interview or article was originally in French or English, however we regret that only an English translation from a foreign language is available. We would be very grateful if any of our readers who may have the original version in French or English, if any, would kindly share it with us. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

MAYBE INCOMPLETE: Although extensive portions from this interview are available below, they do not appear to, or may not, comprise the entire interview and we would be very grateful if any of our readers who may have the complete transcript would kindly share it with us. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

Interviewer: Peter Frey

Below are excerpts from the original English interview video along with Google translations of other portions of the interview published in German (click here)

Karim Aga Khan, the spiritual leader of Ismaili sees Afghanistan on the path to democracy. The country was still facing major challenges such as alleviating poverty, providing the population with food and fight against drug cultivation. The Chairman of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), which invests in aid projects in Afghanistan, warns attacks in the recent past as a specifically Islamic phenomenon to see the terrorist. The faith is for individual conflicts. “Islam is not burdened with the legacy of the political, under which we still suffer today,” said Aga Khan.

Peter Frey: Sovereignty, you are very involved in development aid projects in Afghanistan. Two and a half years after the fall of the Taliban regime — how far Afghanistan has come on the road to democracy?

His Highness the Aga Khan: The path is mapped out, the instruments of democracy which can work with, are developed. The reconstruction of the country is progressing. But it will be a completely new process. We have a new constitution, we will have new political parties. The country is going to change economically. There are so many unknowns.

Following section was transcribed from the original English interview video

PF: Through your development network, which is very active in Afghanistan, you have invested more than $75 million over the last years in schools, in education, into cultural projects, all kinds of different projects. From all these different venues, and there are many, what would you say is the most significant for you personally?

AK: Poverty alleviation. Feeding people who are on the brink of starvation. Rehabilitating people who have left the country in dramatic conditions and have to come back to an environment which has to receive and look after them. So it’s the human dimension of that tragedy which is the most immediate issue for me.

PF: Maybe the most dramatic problem in Afghanistan today is that more and more farmers cultivate poppy seeds to produce opium. How can we win the war against drugs?

[We can impact the drug trade] essentially by taking the country away from economic collapse and giving the population an opportunity to earn honourably and live honourably. I don’t believe populations automatically go into this activity. It’s the response to despair, essentially.

I think essentially by taking the country away from economic collapse and giving the population an opportunity to earn honourably and live honourably. I don’t believe populations automatically go into this activity. It’s the response to despair, essentially.

PF: But we have to admit today that after being liberated, Afghanistan is the number one drug seller of the world.

AK: Yes. You’re correct and I think it’s essential this issue be addressed. It has to be addressed immediately. It’s probably even more grey than we actually see in terms of the figures. It could have a terrible impact on the political process, on the elections, etcetera. So it is an absolute, urgent, issue to address. [cut]

I think that what is essential is to give the population of Afghanistan credible alternatives from which they can earn an honourable living, because at the moment the poverty is still enormous.

I think that what is essential is to give the population of Afghanistan credible alternatives from which they can earn an honourable living, because at the moment the poverty is still enormous. One has to separate out urban environments from rural environments. It’s the rural environments that are at greatest risk at the moment.

PF: Afghanistan is still one of the poorest countries of the world. Also over the last years, millions of dollars have been invested into the country by private organisations like yours and by public organisations. How can we stimulate better the countries own capacity?

AK: I think it’s a question, really, of trying to achieve what I would call a multiple input process. That is, you don’t concentrate only on the economy, you don’t concentrate only on social service. You try to bring all these inputs together to function as a net, and if they function as a net the whole country will move forwards.

It is very difficult to tell at any given time, in a situation like the one in Afghanistan, what input is going to have the most immediate impact. And generally it’s not a national phenomenon. In a country like Afghanistan, it’s by region.

PF: You participated in the Afghanistan conference here in Berlin. It’s the third conference of this type. What would you say is the signal [out there?]?

AK: First I think that the international community is placing it’s trust in a forward process in Afghanistan and that process is on course. People recognise, we all recognise its fragility, but it is on course. Secondly, I think this conference has shown the individuality of the Afghan situation in comparison to other crisis areas of the world. [cut]

PF: Would you say the public, the people in Afghanistan, have been one [sic] for this process over the last years or is there a lot of mistrust, again also the agencies from outside who came into the country?

AK: From what I can see, I would sense immense relief. Relief after decades of conflict, of poverty, of extremism and these are people who are tired and they are looking for a new future. And I think that is the greatest sense I have of what’s happening and it’s upto the international community, the Afghans, organisations such as mine, to turn this fatigue into a process of hope.

Google translation continues

PF: Such trouble spots like Iraq. Do you feel a kind of competition between support for Afghanistan or in Iraq?

AK: No, I do not see this competition. I think the forces that operate in Afghanistan in support are, first of all a lot longer on site. They have a more international character and they are clearly under the leadership of the UN. There is also an Afghan government and a new constitution. The process is thus already on and the background is completely different.

PF: After 11 September and maybe even more after the events in Madrid wonder many German: how to terrorists — in the name of Allah — to commit such atrocities? If you are a Muslim, an answer to this question?

AK: I think you can any people of faith to a level of frustration every lead that he is ready then to resort to extremes. We have seen in Sri Lanka, in Northern Ireland, in Spain — there is no specific Islamic phenomenon. Communities, which have worked for decades with their backs to the wall are seen, in the end completely desperate. It is important to recognise that much of it has nothing to do with the Islamic faith with. Take Kashmir. This was a process of decolonisation, and had nothing to do with Islam. The tensions in the Middle East are a consequence of the First World War. This has nothing to do with Islam do. So Islam does not burden the political heir to the under which we still suffer today.

PF: In the eyes of most Westerners i.e. Islam today: hatred and violence. Should the Islamic Community does not even condemn terrorism much more determined to change that image?

AK: First, there is an enormous chasm of ignorance between the West and the Islamic world. If they present situation in this gap measure, you’ll see a serious misinterpretation. I’ll give you an example: For me, world culture is the absence of Islamic culture in the minds of just incomprehensible. This means that the Western democracies did not have the knowledge, to make an informed decision themselves. We must first solve as. Second, the terrorist is not for a billion people. It stands for single unresolved conflicts. I hope and pray that they will be solved. But it still cost a lot more time and effort is spent has been viewed as.

Original in German

Karim Aga Khan, das geistige Oberhaupt der Ismailiten, sieht Afghanistan auf dem Weg zur Demokratie. Das Land stehe jedoch noch vor großen Herausforderungen wie Linderung der Armut, Versorgung der Bevölkerung mit Lebensmittel und Kampf gegen den Drogenanbau. Der Vorsitzende des Aga-Khan-Entwicklungsnetzwerkes (AKDN), das in Hilfsprojekte in Afghanistan investiert, warnt davor, die terroristischen Anschläge der jüngsten Vergangenheit als ein speziell islamisches Phänomen zu sehen. Der Glaube stehe für einzelne Konflikte. “Lastet dem Islam nicht das politische Erbe an, unter dem wir heute noch leiden”, so Aga Khan.

Peter Frey: Hoheit, Sie sind sehr in Entwicklungshilfeprojekten in Afghanistan engagiert. Zweieinhalb Jahre nach dem Fall des Taliban-Regimes – wie weit ist Afghanistan auf dem Weg zur Demokratie gekommen?

His Highness the Aga Khan: Der Weg ist vorgezeichnet, die Instrumente, mit denen die Demokratie funktionieren kann, werden entwickelt. Der Wiederaufbau des Landes geht voran. Aber es wird ein vollkommen neuer Prozess werden. Wir haben eine neue Verfassung, wir werden neue politische Parteien haben. Das Land wird sich ökonomisch verändern. Es gibt also viele Unbekannte.

PF: Über ihr Entwicklungsnetzwerk haben Sie in den letzten Jahren knapp 80 Millionen Dollar in Afghanistan investiert – von Schulen bis zu Wasserprojekten, von Gesundheits- bis zu Architekturprogrammen. Welches Projekt erscheint Ihnen denn ganz persönlich am wichtigsten?

AK: Die Linderung der Armut, Versorgung einer vom Hunger bedrohten Bevölkerung mit Lebensmitteln, Wiederansiedlung von Menschen, die das Land unter dramatischen Bedingungen verlassen haben und nun in eine Umgebung zurückkehren müssen, die sie aufnehmen und sich um sie kümmern muss. Es ist also die menschliche Dimension dieser Tragödie, die für mich das dringendste Problem darstellt.

PF: Das dramatischste Problem in Afghanistan ist heute, dass immer mehr Bauern in Afghanistan Mohn anbauen, um sich ihren Lebensunterhalt zu verdienen. Wie können wir den Krieg gegen die Drogen gewinnen?

AK: Ich glaube, vor allem, indem wir das Land vor dem wirtschaftlichen Zusammenbruch bewahren und den Menschen glaubwürdige Alternativen anbieten, ihr Geld auf ehrenvolle Weise zu verdienen. Ich glaube nicht, dass die Menschen dem Drogenanbau automatisch nachgehen. Es ist ihre Antwort auf die Verzweiflung.

PF: Afghanistan ist immer noch eines der ärmsten Länder der Welt, obwohl in den letzten Jahren sehr viel privates und öffentliches Geld nach Afghanistan gepumpt wurde. Wie können wir die eigenen Fähigkeiten des Landes besser anregen?

AK: Indem man versucht, einen Prozess mehrfacher Maßnahmen in Gang zu bringen. Wir dürfen uns nicht allein auf die Wirtschaft konzentrieren, nicht nur auf die Sozialleistungen. Wir müssen versuchen, all diese Bereiche zu einem Netz zu verknüpfen. Wenn dieses Netz funktioniert, dann kommt das ganze Land voran. In der Situation, in der sich Afghanistan heute befindet, ist es sehr schwierig vorherzusagen, welche dieser Maßnahmen die unmittelbarste Wirkung haben wird. Und das gilt nicht nur für Afghanistan, sondern für die ganze Region.

PF: Sind denn die Menschen in Afghanistan für diesen Prozess gewonnen worden? Oder gibt es noch immer viel Misstrauen – auch gegenüber den Organisationen aus dem Ausland?

AK: Soweit ich es sehen kann, gibt es das Gefühl ungeheurer Erleichterung nach Jahrzehnten des Konflikts, der Armut, des Extremismus. Die Leute sind einfach total erschöpft und wünschen sich eine neue Zukunft. Das ist das größte Gefühl, was ich dort verspüre. Und das ist die Aufgabe der internationalen Gemeinschaft, der Afghanen selbst und von Organisationen wie der meinen, diese Erschöpfung in Hoffnung umzukehren.

PF: Sie haben an der Afghanistan-Konferenz hier in Berlin teilgenommen. Der dritten ihrer Art. Was ist das Signal von Berlin?

AK: Erstens, dass die Internationale Gemeinschaft auf die Entwicklung in Afghanistan vertraut. Wir wissen alle, wie zerbrechlich dieser Prozess noch ist – aber die Richtung stimmt. Zweitens hat die Konferenz die Einzigartigkeit der Situation Afghanistans im Vergleich mit anderen Krisenherden in der Welt gezeigt.

PF: Solche Krisenherde wie Irak. Empfinden Sie auch eine Art Konkurrenz zwischen der Unterstützung für Afghanistan oder der für den Irak?

AK: Nein, diese Konkurrenz sehe ich nicht. Ich glaube, die Kräfte, die in Afghanistan zur Unterstützung wirken, sind zunächst einmal schon viel länger vor Ort. Sie haben einen internationaleren Charakter und sie stehen eindeutig unter Führung der UNO. Außerdem gibt es eine afghanische Regierung und eine neue Verfassung. Der Prozess ist also schon weiter und der Hintergrund ist ein völlig anderer.

PF: Nach dem 11. September und vielleicht noch mehr nach den Ereignissen in Madrid fragen sich viele Deutsche: Wie können Terroristen – im Namen Allahs – solche Grausamkeiten begehen? Haben Sie als Muslim eine Antwort auf diese Frage?

AK: Ich glaube, Sie können jeden Menschen beliebigen Glaubens zu einer Stufe der Frustration führen, dass er dann bereit ist, zum Äußersten zu greifen. Wir haben das in Sri-Lanka gesehen, in Nord-Irland, in Spanien – es ist kein spezielles islamisches Phänomen. Gemeinschaften, die sich seit Jahrzehnten mit dem Rücken zur Wand sehen, sind am Ende völlig verzweifelt. Es ist wichtig anzuerkennen, dass vieles davon nichts mit dem Glauben des Islam zu tun hat. Nehmen wir Kaschmir. Das war ein Prozess der Entkolonialisierung und hatte nichts mit dem Islam zu tun. Die Spannungen im Nahen Osten sind eine Folge des Ersten Weltkriegs. Das hat nichts mit Islam zu tun. Also lastet dem Islam nicht das politische Erbe an, unter dem wir heute noch leiden.

PF: In den Augen der meisten westlichen Menschen bedeutet Islam heute: Hass und Gewalt. Muss die islamische Gemeinschaft nicht selbst den Terrorismus viel entschlossener verdammen, um dieses Image zu verändern?

AK: Zunächst gibt es eine enorme Kluft der Unkenntnis zwischen der westlichen und der islamischen Welt. Wenn sie die gegenwärtige Situation an dieser Kluft messen, erkennen Sie eine ernsthafte Fehlinterpretation. Ich gebe Ihnen ein Beispiel: Für mich ist das Fehlen der islamischen Kultur im Bewusstsein der Weltkultur einfach unbegreiflich. Das bedeutet, dass die westlichen Demokratien gar nicht über das Wissen verfügen, sich ein fundiertes Urteil zu bilden. Das müssen wir als erstes lösen. Zweitens steht der Terror nicht für eine Milliarde Menschen. Er steht für einzelne ungelöste Konflikte. Ich hoffe und bete dafür, dass sie gelöst werden. Aber das wird noch viel mehr Zeit und Mühe kosten als bisher aufgewandt wurde.

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)