I am very pleased indeed! Alamshar and Dalakhani both had logical reasons to run in the Irish Derby and before that race I did say that I was aiming Alamshar at this race. Dalakhani is having an autumn campaign. The two horses had a programme that was going to clash in the Irish Derby but probably not after that but who knows…. Good horse’s programmes need to be developed race by race and that is what I am trying to do. It does bring back memories of Shergar’s victory in this race. What is exciting is the continuation of the breeding stock which is able to produce horses and of course this horse goes back to Mumtaz Mahal.

MAYBE INCOMPLETE: The remarks below were reported in the press, however it is unclear if they were part of a speech or if additional remarks were also made. We would be very grateful if any of our readers who may have a complete record would kindly share it with us. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

sportinglife.com

Alamshar’s owner the Aga Khan was all smiles as his King George hero returned to the winners’ enclosure and he beamed: “I am very pleased indeed!”

The owner ran his Ascot hero against another of his top colts, Dalakhani, in the Irish Derby but accepts the pair are unlikely to meet in the Arc in October.

Alamshar and Dalakhani both had logical reasons to run in the Irish Derby and before that race I did say that I was aiming Alamshar at this race. Dalakhani is having an autumn campaign.

The two horses had a programme that was going to clash in the Irish Derby but probably not after that but who knows.

I think Alamshar has improved since his Irish Derby victory. I really don’t know if Alamshar and Dalakhani will meet again.

Good horse’s programmes need to be developed race by race and that is what I am trying to do.

It does bring back memories of Shergar’s victory in this race. What is exciting is the continuation of the breeding stock which is able to produce horses and of course this horse goes back to Mumtaz Mahal.

I have a wonderful trainer — his conversations are short and precise — and a wonderful jockey.

The Independant

Alamshar’s victory gave the Aga [Khan] his fifth Irish Derby, after Shergar, Shahrastani, Kahyasi and Sinndar, enabling him to equal the tally of his grandfather. It was appropriate that Alamshar carried the chocolate and green hoops, the old Aga [Khan’s] colours, with Dalakhani sporting the modern green and red.

The International Herald Tribune

On Saturday at Ascot, the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond stakes turned into a battle between two guys with plenty of money and more than a little luck, leaving patience to tip the balance. Alamshar, a 3-year-old colt, the result of 80 years of breeding by the Aga Khan’s family, beat Sulamani, a 4-year-old colt that Sheik Mohammed al-Maktoum bought late last year. Alamshar can trace his line back to Mumtaz Mahal, one of the foundation mares of the Aga Khan’s family breeding operation….

The Aga Khan, on the other hand, only runs horses that come from the family breeding operation, which has been around since the early 1900’s. This year has been the best ever for the famous green-and-red silks, and the Aga Khan sees it as a reward for many years of patience.

[The Aga Khan said:] What’s most exciting is the continuation of the breeding stock. Alamshar is from one of the oldest bloodlines in my family, so it’s very rewarding.

Alamshar, trained by John Oxx in Currabeg, Ireland, settled for third in the Epsom Derby on June 7 before going on to win the Irish Derby three weeks later. The King George is the first serious chance for the Derby generation of 3-year-olds to take on older horses, and before Saturday the results were evenly split between up-and-comers and experienced runners, at 26 victories each.

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)