[Translation] [O]ne must ask oneself the question as to what one wishes to achieve in a post-Saddam Hussain Iraq. Whether the United Nations will agree to become the principal authority for the rebuilding of Iraq? Whether we are moving towards a temporary colonisation by the English and the Americans? Will elections in Iraq lead to Shia power? Will this Shia majority ally itself with Iran, with Yemen? Will there be stronger empathy between Shia Arabs and Shia non-Arabs or between Arab Shias and Arab Sunnis? These are fundamental questions. On the military and economic planes, an Iran-Iraq axis would be extremely powerful. How will Saudi Arabia and its partners react to this redistribution of cards?

Interviewers: Pierre Cochez and Jean-Christophe Ploquin

Translation by ismaili.net — Click here for the original in French

Pierre Cochez and Jean-Christophe Ploquin: How do you see the current conflict in Iraq?

His Highness the Aga Khan: This conflict is the most dangerous that we have experienced for a long time. Its consequences will be extremely difficult to manage, because they have impacted a number of structures: political, theological, economic, in this part of the world. Iraq lies on a fault line between two parts of the Arab world, between the Arab Muslim world and the non-Arab Muslim world; between Shia Muslims and Sunnis; between Wahhabi Muslims and Shias. The conflict has opened a series of fundamental questions which it will be necessary to manage with great prudence. It has touched the area’s religious equilibrium. In Iraq, you had a Sunni-minority government in a majority-Shia country. In Syria, it’s the opposite. As for Saudi Arabia, its positions on a number of points are absolutely and totally rejected by other countries of the same geographical area.

This conflict is the most dangerous that we have experienced for a long time. Its consequences will be extremely difficult to manage, because they have impacted a number of structures …

In this context, one must ask oneself the question as to what one wishes to achieve in a post-Saddam Hussain Iraq. Whether the United Nations will agree to become the principal authority for the rebuilding of Iraq? Whether we are moving towards a temporary colonisation by the English and the Americans? Will elections in Iraq lead to Shia power? Will this Shia majority ally itself with Iran, with Yemen? Will there be stronger empathy between Shia Arabs and Shia non-Arabs or between Arab Shias and Arab Sunnis? These are fundamental questions. On the military and economic planes, an Iran-Iraq axis would be extremely powerful. How will Saudi Arabia and its partners react to this redistribution of cards?

In the face of these questions, we are told that the Iraqis will decide for themselves. But the post-Taliban situation in Afghanistan shows the difficulty of unifying a country, of changing a regime, of finding the leaders to lead the change.

PC/JCP: Many of the actors in this war cite God. What is your feeling?

AK: I do not believe in this notion of war between the Muslim world and Christendom. When one puts the life of men and women at stake, in any war, this poses a moral problem, that of the destiny of the men and women. But I do not see, with Bush or Blair, a hostility of Christendom against Islam. Perhaps there is a tendency to say: “We wage this war in the name of the ethical values of our faith”. The experience of September 11 was profoundly destabilising for the United States. I know Tony Blair rather well. I do not see his personal philosophy being directed against the Muslim world. On the other hand, there is a tendency far too often, in Europe or in America, to assign to the generic words “Arab” or “Muslim” a multitude of countries and positions. We do not pay enough attention to the complexity of this world of which we have such poor knowledge. Before the Iranian revolution, the West did not know the word “Shia”. It took the war in Afghanistan for it to discover the word “Wahhabi”. It is now in the midst of comprehending the complexities of the Muslim world in the course of its crises. I would have wished that this could have been achieved by other means.

PC/JCP: Is it possible to install democracy in Iraq and, more generally, in the Arab world, after the war?

AK: Democracy in Iraq has not been applied for a very long time. Putting in place a credible system will take time and will be very difficult to organise. Afghanistan proves it. And then, we must be prepared to accept the verdict of democracy. This democracy should be applied over time and in [a climate of] stability. In many countries, the democratic experiment has failed. If you wish to set up a democratic process in a Third World country, it is imperative to reflect, not only on the process, but also its effects; its results. Iraq is an educated country, with a grand tradition. But, it is not more pluralistic in its way of thinking than is Afghanistan. Democracy, if it is established in Iraq, must legitimate pluralism. That is not easy to achieve. The bottom line is to have a successful democracy. And for that, it is imperative to seek out elites with competence in governing.

The model of democracy should be adjusted according to the country…. [I]t is necessary then to set up a political system which adapts to political, ethnic, religious, and linguistic realities of the country. For me the basic problem is the management of this pluralism.

PC/JCP: Is the concept of democracy universal?

AK: The model of democracy should be adjusted according to the country. If one changes a one-party regime, as in Iraq, I am in favour. But it is necessary then to set up a political system which adapts to political, ethnic, religious, and linguistic realities of the country. For me the basic problem is the management of this pluralism. This is a fundamental notion in the Third World.

PC/JCP: Up to what point does the international community have to sponsor this democratic process?

AK: The economic reconstruction will require a long-term sponsorship in order to set up a new financial system, a liberalisation of the economy, and a better management of the public funds. Iraq has the chance to have, from the outset, a healthy economy thanks to oil. On the political level, the Iraqis will have to decide for themselves how to refine the democratic process to adapt to their country. That is what is in the process of being done in Afghanistan today. That is what the Iranians are searching at this very moment.

At the political level, we have in the Muslim world — Arab and non-Arab — inherited from the Cold War, this choice which was imposed upon us — between the Soviet system and the Occidental system. The middle way, that of the non-aligned, proved not to be a success. We went from a period of centralisation, based on one-party [rule]. Today, we seek a new way. That is destabilising, because it is new process. The heads of state in Central Asia, for example, have left the Soviet system and are in the process of exploration, of re-learning.

PC/JCP: What experience can you bring, in your capacity as Head of the Ismaili Community?

My grandfather gave, and I have myself given, a certain interpretation to Shiism. The intellect is seen as a facet of faith, in the service of faith. Reason, reflection, form part of the process of decision making. This reflection is desirable, is necessary in the interpretation of religion. This means that we invest in the intellect of the community. This is one of the elements which has made it possible for the Ismaili Community to respond to the problems of … [sentence is incomplete].

AK: Ismaili Shiism has a living Imam, who lives in the world [and] has a great number of contacts. I observe the changes [in the world] and, in so far as possible, I anticipate the manner in which to build institutions which meet the needs of Ismailis. We do not have, in the Ismaili Community, a sole ethnic group, a sole [spoken] language, a sole religious history. I pay attention to this pluralism of traditions. I situate my actions in the context of the [current] times. I have lived through decolonisation, the end of the Cold War, the creation of Bangladesh, the Iranian Revolution. In the face of these situations, it was necessary to reflect, to anticipate, to respond to necessities. My grandfather gave, and I have myself given, a certain interpretation to Shiism. The intellect is seen as a facet of faith, in the service of faith. Reason, reflection, form part of the process of decision making. This reflection is desirable, is necessary in the interpretation of religion. This means that we invest in the intellect of the community. This is one of the elements which has made it possible for the Ismaili Community to respond to the problems of … [sentence is incomplete].

PC/JCP: What comments do you have on the rather strong position of the Pope against the war in Iraq?

Personally, I am vigorously opposed to any notion of intrinsic conflict between the Christian and Muslim worlds. This thesis is farcical! … Stop this facile and childish vision which does not correspond to reality! There are more elements which unite the three monotheistic religions of Abrahamic origin than which divide them…. We are all monotheists. We have common ethical principles, in particular with regard to life. This was identified by a man that I respect, and who is Jewish, Jim Wolfensohn, the president of the World Bank.

AK: I find it very delicate for me to comment on these positions. Personally, I am vigorously opposed to any notion of intrinsic conflict between the Christian and Muslim worlds. This thesis is farcical! This is to ignore the Christian world, which is not unique. No more than does one find a synthesis in the Muslim world. Stop this facile and childish vision which does not correspond to reality! There are more elements which unite the three monotheistic religions of Abrahamic origin than which divide them. The important thing is to determine how these monotheistic religions can build on what unites them, and not to let themselves be divided by circumstances of daily life. I do all that I can so that we build together, in the countries where I am involved, a pluralistic future whose beneficiaries are: civil society and the populations concerned, irrespective of whether they are Christian, Muslim or Jewish. Our obligation is to have a social ethic which functions for the benefit of the poor and which gives them a reason to believe to the future. Someone who has no hope in his life is an individual who is at risk for himself and for his family.

If you look at social ethics of the three monotheistic religions, you will find fantastic platforms for collaboration. These platforms have not functioned in the past. They do not function terribly well today. Take sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of teaching of the young is under the control of the religious authorities. Do they consult between themselves? I do not believe so. We are all monotheists. We have common ethical principles, in particular with regard to life. This was identified by a man that I respect, and who is Jewish, Jim Wolfensohn, the president of the World Bank. He wanted to have an inter-faith dialogue. He did not seek it on the level of theological dialectic. He sought it in the fields which could produce valuable results to the populations for which he carries responsibility. We, ourselves, cooperate with the Catholic Church in various countries.

Original in French

Pierre Cochez and Jean-Christophe Ploquin: Comment vivez-vous le conflit actuel en Irak?

His Highness the Aga Khan: Ce conflit est le plus dangereux que nous ayons vécu depuis longtemps. Ses conséquences seront extrême ment difficiles à gérer, car ils ont mis en cause beaucoup de structures politiques, théologiques, économiques dans cette partie du monde. L’Irak est une zone de faille entre deux parties du monde arabe, entre le monde arabe musulman et le monde musulman non arabe, entre musulmans chiites et sun nites, entre musulmans wahhabites et chiites. Le conflit a ouvert une série de questions de fond qu’il va falloir gérer avec énormément de prudence. Il a touché aux équilibres religieux de la zone. En Irak, vous aviez un gouvernement sunnite minoritaire dans un pays majoritairement chiite. En Syrie, c’est l’inverse. Quant à l’Arabie saoudite, ses positions sur un certain nombre de points sont absolument et totalement rejetées par d’autres pays de la même zone géographique.

Dans ce contexte, il faut se poser la question de savoir à quoi on sou haite arriver dans l’Irak post-Saddam Hussein. Est-ce que les Nations unies vont accepter de devenir l’autorité principale pour la reconstruction de l’Irak? Va-t-on vers une colonisation temporaire par les Anglais et les Américains? Des élections en Irak conduiront-elles à un pouvoir chiite? Est-ce que cette majorité chiite s’allierait avec l’Iran, avec le Yémen? L’empathie serat-elle plus forte entre les chiites arabes et les chiites non arabes qu’entre les chiites arabes et les sunnites arabes? Ce sont des questions de fond. Sur le plan militaire et économique, un axe Iran-Irak serait extrêmement puissant. Comment l’Arabie saoudite et ses partenaires réagiraient-ils à cette redistribution des cartes?

Face à ces questions, on nous dit que les Irakiens vont décider pour eux-mêmes. Mais la situation post-talibans en Afghanistan, montre la difficulté d’unifier un pays, de changer un régime, de trouver les leaders pour conduire le changement.

PC/JCP: Beaucoup d’acteurs de cette guerre se sont réclamés de Dieu. Quel est votre sentiment?

AK: Je ne crois pas à cette notion de guerre entre monde musulman et monde chrétien. Quand on met la vie des hommes et des femmes en jeu, dans n’importe quelle guerre se pose un problème moral, celui de la destinée des hommes et des femmes. Mais je ne vois pas, chez Bush ou Blair, une hostilité de la chrétienté contre l’islam. Il y a peut-être une tendance à dire : « Nous faisons cette guerre au nom de l’éthique de notre croyance ». L’expérience du 11 septembre a été profondément déstabilisante pour les États-Unis. Je connais assez bien Tony Blair. Je ne vois pas sa morale se tourner contre le monde musulman. Par ailleurs, on a trop tendance, en Europe ou en Amérique, à assimiler aux mots génériques « arabe » ou « musulman » une multitude de pays et de positions. On ne fait pas assez attention à la complexité de ce monde que l’on connaît très mal. Avant la révolution iranienne, le monde occidental ne connaissait pas le mot « chiite ». Il a fallu la guerre en Afghanistan pour qu’il découvre le mot « wahhabite ». Il est en train d’apprendre les complexités du monde musulman à travers ces crises. J’aurais souhaité que ce soit par un autre moyen.

PC/JCP: Pourra-t-on effectivement instaurer la démocratie en Irak et, plus généralement, dans le monde arabe, après la guerre?

AK: La démocratie en Irak n’a pas été appliquée depuis très longtemps. Mettre en place un système crédible prendra du temps et sera difficile à organiser. L’Afghanistan le prouve. Et puis, il faut être prêt à accepter le verdict de la démocratie. Cette démocratie doit s’inscrire dans la durée et la stabilité. Dans beaucoup de pays, l’expérience démocratique a échoué. Si vous voulez mettre en place un processus démocratique dans un pays du tiers monde, il faut bien réfléchir, non pas seulement au processus, mais à ses effets, à ses résultats. L’Irak est un pays éduqué, avec une grande tradition. Mais, il n’est pas plus pluraliste dans sa façon de réfléchir que ne l’est l’Afghanistan. La démocratie, si elle est installée en Irak, doit légitimer le pluralisme. Ce n’est pas facile à faire. La question de fond, c’est une démocratie réussie. Et pour cela, il faut trouver des élites avec des compétences en matière de gouvernance.

PC/JCP: Le concept de démocratie est-il universel?

AK: Le modèle de démocratie s’ajuste suivant les pays. Si l’on change un régime à parti unique, comme en Irak, j’y suis favorable, mais il faut alors mettre en place un système politique qui s’adapte à la réalité politique, ethnique, religieuse, linguistique du pays. Pour moi, le problème de fond, c’est de gérer ce pluralisme. C’est une notion fondamentale dans le tiers monde.

PC/JCP: Jusqu’où la communauté internationale doit-elle parrainer ce processus démocratique?

AK: La reconstruction économique va demander pendant longtemps un parrainage pour mettre en place un nouveau système financier, une libéralisation de l’économie, une meilleure gestion des avoirs publics. L’Irak a la chance d’avoir, au départ, une économie saine grâce au pétrole. Au niveau politique, les Irakiens vont devoir décider eux-mêmes comment affiner le processus démocratique pour l’adapter à leur propre pays. C’est ce qui est en train de se faire en Afghanistan aujourd’hui. C’est ce que cherchent en ce moment les Iraniens.

Au niveau politique, nous avons dans le monde musulman, arabe et non arabe, hérité de la guerre froide, de ce choix qui nous a été imposé entre le système soviétique et le système occidental. La voie du milieu, celle des non-alignés, n’a pas été une réussite. Nous sommes passés par une période de centralisme, basé sur des partis uniques. Aujourd’hui, nous cherchons une nouvelle voie. C’est déstabilisant, car c’est un processus nouveau. Les chefs d’État d’Asie centrale, par exemple, sortent d’un système soviétique et sont dans un processus d’exploration, d’apprentissage.

PC/JCP: Quelle expérience pouvezvous apporter, en tant que chef de la communauté ismaélienne?

AK: Le chiisme ismaélien a un imam vivant, qui vit dans le monde, a un grand nombre de contacts. J’observe le changement et, dans la mesure du possible, je l’anticipe de manière à construire des institutions qui répondent aux besoins des ismaéliens. Nous n’avons pas, dans la communauté ismaélienne, une seule ethnie, une seule langue, une seule histoire religieuse. Je suis à l’écoute de ce pluralisme de traditions. Je situe mon action dans le temps. J’ai vécu la décolonisation, la fin de la guerre froide, la création du Bangladesh, la révolution iranienne. Devant ces situations, il a fallu réfléchir, anticiper, répondre à des nécessités. Mon grand-père a donné, et je donne moi-même, une certaine interprétation du chiisme. L’intellect y est vu comme une facette de la croyance, au service de la croyance. La logique, la réflexion font partie d’un processus de décision. Cette réflexion est souhaitée, est nécessaire à l’interprétation de la religion. Cela veut dire que l’on investit dans l’intellect d’une communauté. C’est un des éléments qui a permis à la communauté ismaélienne de répondre aux problèmes de … [sentence is incomplete]

PC/JCP: Quel commentaire faites-vous sur la position assez offensive du Pape contre la guerre en Irak?

AK: Il est très délicat pour moi de commenter ces positions. Personnellement, je suis vigoureusement opposé à toute notion de conflit intrinsèque entre le monde chrétien et le monde musulman. Cette thèse est une grande farce ! C’est méconnaître le monde chrétien, qui n’est pas unique. Pas plus qu’il n’y a pas de synthèse dans le monde musulman. Arrêtons cette vision facile et enfantine qui ne correspond pas à la réalité!

Il y a plus d’éléments qui rassemblent les trois religions monothéistes, abramiques d’origine, qu’il n’y a de différences. La question est de savoir comment les religions monothéistes peuvent construire sur ce qui les unit, et ne pas se laisser diviser par des circonstances de la vie. Je fais tout ce que je peux pour que l’on construise ensemble, dans les pays où je suis engagé, un avenir pluraliste dont les bénéficiaires sont la société civile et les populations concernées, qu’elles soient chrétiennes, musulmanes ou juives. Notre obligation est d’avoir une éthique sociale qui fonctionne au bénéfice des pauvres et qui leur donne une raison de croire à l’avenir. Quelqu’un qui n’a pas d’espoir dans sa vie est un individu qui est à risques pour lui-même et pour sa famille.

Si vous regardez l’éthique sociale des trois religions monothéistes, vous trouvez des plates-formes fantastiques de collaboration. Ces plates-formes n’ont pas fonctionné dans le passé. Elles ne fonctionnent pas très bien aujourd’hui. Prenez l’Afrique subsaharienne. La majorité de l’enseignement de la jeunesse est sous le contrôle des religions. Se consultent-elles entre elles? Je ne le crois pas. Nous sommes tous monothéistes. Nous avons des principes éthiques communs, en particulier en ce qui concerne la vie. Cela a été identifié par un homme que j’estime et qui est juif, Jim Wolfensohn, le président de la Banque mondiale. Il a voulu le dialogue interconfessionnel. Il ne l’a pas cherché au niveau de la dialectique théologique. Il l’a cherché dans les domaines qui peuvent apporter un résultat valable aux populations dont il a la responsabilité. Nous-mêmes nous coopérons avec l’Église catholique dans différents pays.

SOURCES

  • La Croix, 8 April 2003, pp. 8
  • French text: ismaili.net
  • Translation text: ismaili.net

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)