Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation International Interview (Aleppo, Syria and Lebanon)

[Translation] Why is it that we have that impression — and it’s good, I think it is an advantage — that they [the Ismailis] are more modern, modern in the Western sense?

I think that it comes to the same question we discussed previously. Let’s go back. How did the Westerners learn about culture, about Greek philosophy? How did they learn it? They searched amongst philosophers, scientists, theologians. They went looking amongst the Muslim intelligentsia of that time, for translations, which had disappeared from their original state and, the Muslim world became a world of transition so that the West relearned its own history.

All right! What is happening today? I am saying to myself, that the Muslim World, at least the Ismaili community, we should not live outside the realities of our world. On the contrary, we have to absorb them make them work for us and to our advantage. And if there are organisational systems in the human society that work well today, or at least better than others, we would lack intelligence, not to say more, not to see what we can learn, what we can integrate, what we can remodel. Because we do not have to take everything. We should take what helps us. And that’s where that relation with the West looks important to me. One does not lose his identity; one does not lose his religion …

Interviewer: Unknown

Translation by ismaili.net — Click here for the original in French

Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation: Good evening your Highness, we are honoured that you are giving us an interview for the channel, LBC. Well, we came to Aleppo because you are here, for a Syrian visit. But of course, there is an occasion; there was the ceremony of the Award for Architecture. You said in your speech — which I personally liked very much on many points; we’ll talk about it later — you said in your speech, that you consider the Aleppo citadel, and I am not sure I am translating accurately what you said, that you consider it as a personal quest to take place in history and in the heritage.

His Highness the Aga Khan: Yes …

LBC: What does the Citadel and Syria represent for you personally?

AK: In fact, I tried to explain that I had a family attachment with Syria because my family had been Syrian for two centuries, and also an intellectual affinity because Syria does represent many things on the philosophical level, on the level of thinking, history of faith, which are important for me, so that was a way to say that this ceremony is not only a ceremony for the architecture award participants but also an occasion of happiness for me.

LBC: Yes, it was perhaps a way to say that you have the same heritage.

AK: Certainly! I do have the same heritage!

LBC: Voilà! Your Highness, in your opening speech at the site, I have noted a few points, may I ask …

AK: Yes, please …

LBC: I think that what is presently happening between the Islamic World and the Western world is in some way global. You have talked about the Silk Road, as you had the Silk Road ensemble, which links Asia to the Middle East. So, for you, what does the Silk Road cover?

AK: Well, listen; first, there were obviously many roads, but in fact it is a link that, in its most powerful form, linked China to Western Europe, therefore it is a human, cultural, diplomatic and states route, by its neighbourhood and common border demography, links all those countries. Therefore it is something very very special.

LBC: Yes, but this was in history. Today, if we talk geographically, it’s a road controlled by Islamic fanatics, what we call that Silk Road.

AK: No. No, a part may be, but not the whole road. Let’s say one part goes through countries where there are internal tensions and countries where unfortunately there is war.

LBC: Yes, yes. And you think that it blocks what happens between Asia and Middle East and that is the main reason?

[What] we see for example in Afghanistan cannot be projected as if it was originating from the essence of Islam. That is not true. This is like if I was to ask the Christian world “Is inquisition representative of Christianity?”

AK: Of course, of course. I have tried, not in my speech but in another commentary of the situation, to explain that the phenomena that we see for example in Afghanistan cannot be projected as if it was originating from the essence of Islam. That is not true. This is like if I was to ask the Christian world “Is inquisition representative of Christianity?” So we cannot take situations, which are individual, unique, and specific in time, in history, in geography and say, “All this represents the totality of more than a billion Muslims”. But unfortunately, one represents the situation as if it was the case. And in my speech and at the architecture award, amongst others, I have tried, on the contrary, to show that the Muslim World is pluralistic, and it has been so since centuries.

LBC: You feel that the Muslim World is pluralistic? You have talked of a place for pluralism in the Islamic World. Legitimacy, you have talked of the legitimacy of pluralism. Do you think that it exists?

AK: Oh Yes! Historically it exists.

LBC: Yes but does it presently?

AK: But even today, you see, I think we have difficulty making people around the world realise what is the Islamic World. One should not confuse Sub-Saharan Africa with Central Asia. One should not confuse Central Asia with countries of Asia such as Malaysia and Indonesia. These are different peoples, with different histories, that have been converted to Islam at different times, that have evolved since then, that have different languages, that have different interpretations. What is the big problem? It is to know if that diversity is a strength or a weakness. And what I say is that the Muslim World — well, what I wish — is that the Muslim World looks at that situation as if it was a marvellous opportunity. Not that diversity weakens us. That is the fundamental problem.

LBC: Yes, but is there a place in the Islamic World for the other religions?

AK: Oh, for sure! Islam is a faith that recognises the preceding monotheistic interpretations, Judaism and Christianity, called the “People of the Book”. It is one Book. So for me there is no doubt whatsoever.

LBC: You have talked of pluralism, you have talked of the Silk Road, you have also talked of the West and the Islamic World. You have a superb sentence I think, “Of course there are some superficial disagreements, nothing so deep that it would hinder a mutual understanding and respect.” You know, you talk about the heritage of Abraham and its ethical principles, but do you think that there has been no clash between the West and the Islamic World?

AK: No, no.

LBC: What happened on September 11 and afterwards, was it not a historical misunderstanding?

I think that we cannot attribute the events of September 11th to an interpretation that says that it came from the faith of Islam, or from the cultures of Islam, because there are many, as there are many Christian cultures. One cannot talk to me of conflict of civilisations.

AK: I think that we cannot attribute the events of September 11th to an interpretation that says that it came from the faith of Islam, or from the cultures of Islam, because there are many, as there are many Christian cultures. One cannot talk to me of conflict of civilisations. To begin with, we should put “civilisations” in plural. So it would require conflicts between different civilisations, which have evolved in history. That’s not the case, one cannot present this today as the result of hundreds and hundreds of years of conflict. What I am saying is that the basis of an understanding can be put into effect through the acceptance of the ethical principles common to the Abrahamic faiths. Forms are different. The ethical principles, the principles on which the human society lives, the attitude towards the poor, the attitude towards the marginalised, the attitude or the preoccupations of a society dominated by the male portion of the society, all of that, we can find it everywhere. We find it in the Christian society, in Christian cultures of the past, of the present, and in the Muslim World it is the same thing. So, if I am told that all this represents, in a rather simplistic way, a conflict, no, no!

LBC: I have to break for a commercial. If you want, we will talk of all this later, a little bit about the Ismailis, the Aga Khans and, after that I think, we’ll return to Islam and the modern challenge.

LBC: Your Highness, when we say “Imam”, usually we imagine a bearded man with a turban. Is it that the Imam, amongst Ismailis, has a civilian look?

[As Imam,] it is not only on religious grounds that I have to intervene, but also on ethical grounds. How does the ethic of faith translate into daily life? Voilà!

AK: No, I think that we wish to have a role that is balanced. I think that in Islam the notion of Imam is also a notion of a civil responsibility for those under his responsibility. And in the case of the Ismailis, I have a moral — and as far as I can exercise it in an efficient manner, a material responsibility, to assure the quality of life of the members of the Ismaili community. So, if you will, it is not only on religious grounds that I have to intervene, but also on ethical grounds. How does the ethic of faith translate into daily life? Voilà!

LBC: There is a religious role, a role specifically religious in the supreme leader …

AK: Indeed! Indeed! There is much reflection being done on history, on the interpretation. One has also to see that the Ismaili community is very international and in history, the community itself is pluralist. In a way, it almost reflects the pluralism of Islam.

[O]ne has to say, you are cosmopolitan. I am Muslim. — You do not have another identity? None whatsoever? No, none, none! — You do not have an attachment to your country of origin? You tell me my “country of origin” … [T]he only guideline that I have in my life, the dominant one, is the religion in which I was raised. — How can a man live without [a country of origin]? That is, not have a place, a precise geography? But on the contrary, I am freer! I am much freer!

LBC: As you yourself are, one has to say, you are cosmopolitan.

AK: I am Muslim.

LBC: You do not have another identity? None whatsoever?

AK: No, none, none!

LBC: You do not have an attachment to your country of origin?

AK: You tell me my “country of origin”. I wouldn’t even be able to define it for you, because I am born in Switzerland, I have parents who are from the Muslim World and from the Christian World, I have had my initial education in Africa then Switzerland and then in the United States, I have travelled all my life. And the only guideline that I have in my life, the dominant one, is the religion in which I was raised.

LBC: How can a man live without [a country of origin]? That is, not have a place, a precise geography?

AK: But on the contrary, I am freer! I am much freer!

LBC: Sure, but aren’t you curious to see the village of your ancestors in India or in Pakistan?

AK: I have to see all the villages where something is happening and the roots that I have are not in a specific place, they are in a function.

LBC: What are your functions? Do you have Council of Ismailis from all over the place, each specifically in its country? How does it function in practise?

The Ismaili community can live in a secular Hindu state, it can live in a country where the national religion is Islam, it can live in a country where the national religion is Christian and thus, I have looked to adapt each, say, instrument of governance that belongs to the community to the situation in which it lives. And that’s part of that notion of pluralism in a global interpretation, of what has to be the structure that we have.

AK: Well, listen, it has evolved in time, obviously, between what my grandfather did and what I have done since then, there has been much change. But overall, we have had structures for the Ismaili community, and where there is a concentration of Ismailis, in a country or a region, there is a national council or a regional council. And this council has a responsibility, say, civil, for how the community evolves etc. And those structures are governed by a constitution. It is a universal constitution. This universal constitution has regulations, if you will, “Rules and Regulations” which are adapted according to the country where the Ismaili community lives. The Ismaili community can live in a secular Hindu state, it can live in a country where the national religion is Islam, it can live in a country where the national religion is Christian and thus, I have looked to adapt each, say, instrument of governance that belongs to the community to the situation in which it lives. And that’s part of that notion of pluralism in a global interpretation, of what has to be the structure that we have. All right, that is for the community. And then, apart from the community but acting inside the community, there is the Aga Khan Development Network. These are civil institutions, which intervene in various fields of necessity of life, as much for Ismailis as for others.

LBC: Yes, but what is the aim of those organisations? In any case, we’ll see it in the documentary, not to emphasise too much, is there a precise goal, is there a precise mission, which stems from the religion?

[The Ismaili] interpretation has evolved across time, and has also evolved geographically, because I think that it is a reality. Any religion evolves, according to the contacts it has with countries, populations.

AK: Of course, it is a community built around an interpretation of faith, which is its own. That interpretation has evolved across time, and has also evolved geographically, because I think that it is a reality. Any religion evolves, according to the contacts it has with countries, populations. Thus it is the notion of global brotherhood of the same interpretation of Islam.

LBC: But are your projects more for the Ismaili community than others or in areas where there are more Muslims …

AK: You are right and I will tell you … there are priorities. The priorities are high-risk areas. So the high-risk areas are areas of the world where people risk famine, where standards of livings are too low to be acceptable, and then, these areas are identified and I intervene in those areas. All right, in those areas, there are Ismailis and non-Ismailis. The intervention is done for the totality of the community, without any segregation. On the contrary, we interpret our moral and ethical responsibilities, as obliging us to take care of the populations, which are in the areas of activity. And there are situations where our institutions are in vast majority non-Ismailis.

LBC: Which means?

AK: There are schools, hundreds of schools in the world, that we manage and where there are more non-Ismailis than Ismailis. OK. In our health system, in our hospitals, there is a vast majority of non-Ismaili patients, who come there for treatments.

LBC: Your Highness, are you doing all this by simple charity? Is it to please God? Why? What is the doctrine? Is it steaming from the faith? Or is it that the Aga Khans have a special philosophy?

[The development activity] comes from the principle that I have to intervene and help where the quality of life is not acceptable. So, be it in Northwest Pakistan, be it in Mozambique, be it in Afghanistan or in Tajikistan, the intervention has to be done where there is the greatest demand.

AK: No, no, it comes from the principle that I have to intervene and help where the quality of life is not acceptable. So, be it in Northwest Pakistan, be it in Mozambique, be it in Afghanistan or in Tajikistan, the intervention has to be done where there is the greatest demand. All right. You see that in the decades since the death of my grandfather, the situation has greatly changed. Thus, take for instance the Uganda case. Under Idi Amin there was, in Uganda, a national catastrophe, a regional catastrophe, because it had a ripple effect of very grave risks for all of East Africa. Then the immigrants leave, Muslims, non-Muslims, nationals, non-nationals, nothing doing. OK. Fifteen or twenty years later though, the leadership changes. A new president comes to power. What does he do? He contacts me immediately and tells me “Come back and help me rebuild my country.” So, if you want, time changes situations, makes them different. Thus the institution that I represent, the Imamat, has to adapt according to the needs. It has to go beyond, it should anticipate situations. It has to be in a position to say that such and such area of the world is at great social, economic, political risk, whatever. Other areas are stable. These are areas where people live in acceptable conditions.

LBC: Is it different from the community, that is, is all this under the sponsorship of the Ismaili community or is it under the Aga Khan Foundation? Or there is no difference?

AK: No, no, I wouldn’t say that. I would say, if you take for example Tajikistan, Tajikistan went through a civil war that just ended. In Tajikistan, there is one part with a high Ismaili density and another part with a high non-Ismaili density. OK. The totality of that part represents a high-risk population because it lives in atrocious conditions of economic poverty. All right, for whom do I intervene? I intervene for all that population.

LBC: And who finances all that?

AK: The Imamat, plus all our partners, we have many partners. We would never be able to be efficient in all the fields where we wish to be with only our own resources. That is not possible.

LBC: I will ask you a question, I think hundreds of journalists have asked you this question: Why did you succeed your grandfather Aga Khan III and not your father who was still alive?

AK: I can only tell you what he said. My grandfather had been Imam for seventy-two years of his life. So at the age of eight, he was Imam of the Ismailis, up to the age of eighty.

LBC: It is possible at the age of eight to become the supreme chief of a community? How does that work? Isn’t there a council, which oversees?

AK: Indeed, indeed! In all religious structures or other, there are structures. My grandfather died after seventy-two years of Imamat and he left in his will, an explanation and he said: Voilà, the world is changing and the world is changing at a rapid pace. And I want to be followed by someone who is much younger than me. Because that someone will have, I hope, the possibility to react to the changing world with a new vision. And that is what happened, because when he died, he was eighty years old and I was twenty. I was still in university.

LBC: And how did your father react to this?

AK: He has been of a rigour, of a loyalty absolutely remarkable. Remarkable!

LBC: And you have appointed your successor? How does it work?

AK: The Imam names his successor and then, of course, he is of his choice up to his last day.

LBC: So we do not know your successor in principle?

AK: I do not talk of it.

[My grandfather left his country of origin] because, I think, he lived in a period when he was worried that the marasm [difficulties] of the Third World would interfere with what he wanted to do for his community. And he made the decision to say, if I am to serve my community, I am obliged to seek competencies of the modern world, networking with the modern world, nations of modern development to bring them to my community. And that’s exactly what he did.

LBC: And why did your grandfather leave his country of origin?

AK: Because, I think, he lived in a period when he was worried that the marasm [difficulties] of the Third World would interfere with what he wanted to do for his community. And he made the decision to say, if I am to serve my community, I am obliged to seek competencies of the modern world, networking with the modern world, nations of modern development to bring them to my community. And that’s exactly what he did.

LBC: In any case, many from his community followed him to Africa, I think?

AK: No, no, wait, you are talking of my grandfather? My grandfather left India to establish himself in Europe. Voilà! Ismailis stayed in most of the countries where they were.

LBC: They stayed there?

AK: Yes, when my grandfather died, there were perhaps in England a hundred Ismailis.

LBC: Why is it said that the Ismailis are great businessmen in the world?

AK: Oh, I think it is perhaps a notion of Ismailis, which were more on the forefront. Of those that were more in the forefront! Since the sixties, seventies, the community has much much evolved. To begin with, there is a large percentage of the community that lives in rural areas, which are absolutely not urbanised. Secondly, there is a new generation, rather several generations of professionals, men and women who have a modern education, who are bilingual, trilingual and who have professional activities as much in the West as in other countries. So, if you will, this notion of a business community does not now represent reality anymore.

LBC: And is it that we have that impression — and it’s good, I think it is an advantage — that they are more modern, modern in the Western sense?

AK: I think that it comes to the same question we discussed previously. Let’s go back. How did the Westerners learn about culture, about Greek philosophy? How did they learn it? They searched amongst philosophers, scientists, theologians. They went looking amongst the Muslim intelligentsia of that time, for translations, which had disappeared from their original state and, the Muslim world became a world of transition so that the West relearned its own history. All right! What is happening today? I am saying to myself, that the Muslim World, at least the Ismaili community, we should not live outside the realities of our world. On the contrary, we have to absorb them make them work for us and to our advantage. And if there are organisational systems in the human society that work well today, or at least better than others, we would lack intelligence, not to say more, not to see what we can learn, what we can integrate, what we can remodel. Because we do not have to take everything. We should take what helps us. And that’s where that relation with the West looks important to me. One does not lose his identity; one does not lose his religion …

LBC: Because you are not completely dissolved in the societies in which you live …

AK: Absolutely not. The vast majority of the community is not in the West, and its first language is not a Western language. We have made English our second language. That yes! Because, in the sixties, in the seventies, we needed to have a language policy. If a community was without a language policy, it would dissociate itself from its development potential. And English is the language that we chose. So today, the Ismaili community speaks Farsi, Arabic, Swahili, English, French, Portuguese, etc. And then, there is a language that is more and more common, it’s their second language, for a large majority it is English.

LBC: During your reflections, did you think what would have been the face of the Ismailis in the world if your grandfather would have not left India?

[P]ersonally, I have no shame, none whatsoever, if I have to follow today in the same footsteps that the Christians followed in their history: to learn from the Muslim World, well, so what? Why should it matter?

AK: If he would have not left India, I can only speculate. But I think that the community, not only the Ismaili community, which turns its back to parallel civilisations which are powerful, builders, efficient, which have created institutions that renew themselves, I think it means not acting in the interest of the concerned populations. And personally, I have no shame, none whatsoever, if I have to follow today in the same footsteps that the Christians followed in their history: to learn from the Muslim World, well, so what? Why should it matter?

LBC: Socially speaking, you have some differences with other Muslim communities; polygamy is forbidden amongst the Ismailis. And since when is this?

“Forbidden”, is perhaps a word, which does not correspond, but we think that it is a practise that we should discourage. But it is not forbidden, you understand. Each family will decide ultimately for itself what it wants to do or not do…. Today my worry is not there. My worry is the notion of unique family, which is in the process of destroying itself. Voilà! We are further than the polygamy today. Today we face a situation where a part of our world accepts that children are born outside the family.

AK: It is. My grandfather that took that decision, and I have maintained it. “Forbidden”, is perhaps a word, which does not correspond, but we think that it is a practise that we should discourage. But it is not forbidden, you understand. Each family will decide ultimately for itself what it wants to do or not do. And that is what happens. But I think that this notion to have a unique family in the modern world, and I underline modern world, I don’t talk of the past, I think that it is a social structure which is good. Today my worry is not there. My worry is the notion of unique family, which is in the process of destroying itself. Voilà! We are further than the polygamy today. Today we face a situation where a part of our world accepts that children are born outside the family.

[In Islam, marriage] is a contract between a man and a woman.

LBC: And is that why you have two weddings: The civil wedding and the religious wedding in your community?

AK: No, no, no. That is a form, but in fact marriage is not sacred in Islam.

LBC: Yes

AK: In reality it is a contract between a man and a woman.

LBC: Exactly.

AK: Yes.

LBC: But is it because you are in Europe that you do that?

AK: No, we do it because it has become a tradition, even in non-Ismaili Muslim communities, to seek blessings over the marriage etc.

LBC: Your Highness, your wife is directly named Begum or do you have to name her yourself?

AK: She automatically gets the title … It is an honoured title, if you will, of a woman of high rank. Voilà!

LBC: Is she veiled?

AK: No, she is not veiled.

LBC: Are you concerned by politics in general?

AK: I am not a political personality but politics do influence all the countries where there is an Ismaili community, it influences international organisations and international financial systems, it influences the priorities of the Western countries and the developing countries so the answer is indirectly yes, but not directly.

LBC: More precisely, Middle East? Do you have clear positions concerning the Israeli-Arab conflict, concerning Jerusalem?

AK: No, It is not an everyday question in my life because I am not involved there, I am much more engaged in Afghanistan, because there is an Ismaili community which lives there and in all neighbouring countries. Well, for the situation in Middle East, I …

LBC: There isn’t in Palestine?

AK: No.

LBC: No? Not at all?

Well, I have been a student of history, I have read the Balfour Declaration, I have read the Sykes-Picot Agreement when I was student, and it had just been released, so if you will, I know history. And it is terrible. It is terrible.

AK: No, No. Well, I have been a student of history, I have read the Balfour Declaration, I have read the Sykes-Picot Agreement when I was student, and it had just been released, so if you will, I know history. And it is terrible. It is terrible. But we have a terrible historical heritage that we have to resolve. We have to resolve it. And I think that this situation in the Middle East shows a fundamental problem that is: if you leave a situation to degrade, decade after decade, it ends up becoming a global problem. And now, we should find a solution. This situation has lasted much too long, much too long.

LBC: Do you have a precise idea of peace, how do you see it? Jerusalem, for you, does it represent for you, for example, a special city for Islam?

AK: But of course, it cannot be otherwise. To tell you that I have a precise vision of the legal status of Jerusalem, no, I do not have a precise vision. If you are to ask me: do I have a vision of what has to be the next step in Afghanistan, I would tell you yes, you understand, because I am directly involved.

LBC: But in the Middle East, no?

AK: Not directly.

LBC: Even though there is an Ismaili community in Syria?

AK: In Syria, we are involved by the Syrian position because each community is part of the national psyche, you understand.

LBC: So we will talk of Afghanistan. But first, how do you define jihad?

AK: But how do you see the jihad, what is the definition that you want to give yourself of jihad?

LBC: Holy War, what is called holy war since history, and the present interpretation, of course?

[T]he jihad is before anything else, a personal discipline. To begin, it is the search for personal improvement, which means that it is a personal effort in life. That’s one definition.

AK: To begin with, I think that there are several interpretations today. I do not think that there is in the Muslim World only one definition of jihad. The word is used too frequently, and in too many fields. But the jihad is before anything else, a personal discipline. To begin, it is the search for personal improvement, which means that it is a personal effort in life. That’s one definition. Another definition is the war against non-believers. Well, another definition. Third definition, it is war against those who attack a Muslim community, those who victimise a Muslim community. Another definition. So if you want, in the notion of jihad, I think we have to be very careful not to give to this word a unique interpretation. Let’s say this word is used in various situations in our world, today.

LBC: Who are the non-believers for you?

AK: If I go back in time, a long time ago, I think we have to say that the “People of the Book” are the monotheists. That’s the basic definition. Well, today I think in Islam we should admit that in social life, we are obliged, and we have to accept the notion of a larger responsibility. That’s the one in my interpretation. And I believe it to be true. I would say even more than that, that in Muslim history, when this type of circumstances has occurred, the Islamic period has often been the most beautiful. This is very strange, it’s a phenomenon of history but it is a reality.

LBC: Yes, (but) it has been most beautiful for the Muslims, no?

AK: But of course, that’s what I said. Because it is the humanism of Islam, which allowed us to build a society, where everyone was happy to live in that society. Isn’t this the wish that we should have?

LBC: When you say “non-believers”, you talk of the “People of the Book” or the monotheist. Well, there has been a jihad in Afghanistan against the Soviet Regime, that is against communism, thus against “non-believers”. So you interpret that jihad as a good jihad in the interest of Muslims?

Listen, certainly I could not have been in favour of an invasion be it in Afghanistan or elsewhere. You see, the notion of invasion is, for me, an unacceptable notion.

AK: The jihad in Afghanistan? Listen, certainly I could not have been in favour of an invasion be it in Afghanistan or elsewhere. You see? The notion of invasion is, for me, an unacceptable notion. In retrospect, if you ask the Russians today, they will tell you “We should have never done it”. By opposition, when you talk to me of a jihad between Muslims, I have a lot of difficulties accepting that, a lot!

LBC: Well, and now that there will be an American invasion of Afghanistan, how would you see all this?

AK: It is already in place. It is already in place!

LBC: Yes, so what do you think of it?

Today, one has to ask this question: “What do we wish for Afghanistan?” One has to ask what this conflict situation will bear. And that is where I have engaged myself, and I engage myself everyday, to try to contribute to the visualisation of a pacified, pluralist, modern and stable Afghanistan and where the original demographics, the demography preceding the conflict, can be re-established.

AK: I think that unfortunately, the civilised world has not been able to change the social, ethical, human norms that the Taliban movement tried to impose on Afghanistan. And here I want to be clear: everyone who tried to change this, Muslim and non-Muslim, they all failed. We cannot say that it is a unilateral failure of a Muslim World or of a Christian World. It is the civilised world, as I understand, which did not succeed in changing that situation. Today, one has to ask this question: “What do we wish for Afghanistan?” One has to ask what this conflict situation will bear. And that is where I have engaged myself, and I engage myself everyday, to try to contribute to the visualisation of a pacified, pluralist, modern and stable Afghanistan and where the original demographics, the demography preceding the conflict, can be re-established. And there are four million refugees that have to be repatriated. So if you want, the problem that I ponder is that the military situation is there, but the most important point is how do we rebuild Afghanistan? If we had to go through that tragedy, and come to that situation where the Afghan population are presently, what can we wish? What can we pray for, for this population? And that is where I think, if you want, that the Ummah can come to a consensus and should contribute to that visualisation.

LBC: So you are rather optimistic?

AK: Ah no!

LBC: You say that it is possible. Me, I think that the whole problem is that we are not able to put a government to replace the Taliban. I think that, that is the problem of the United States that is the problem of Pakistan, of Iran and of everyone.

AK: Listen, I think we should look further. I am not optimistic because I don’t like war. But we there are. I am optimistic in the vision of what can be put into effect in Afghanistan because I am convinced that we can come to a consensus of vision for the large majority of Afghans and the neighbouring countries. I am profoundly convinced. I think further that that vision of consensus should be supported vigorously, but vigorously, for the rebuilding of Afghanistan. Morally it is intolerable that the Afghans continue to live like this for more decades, that’s not possible!

LBC: “To live like this”, that means under the Taliban regime?

AK: No, in civil war! From the Russian invasion, to the internal war situation, until the position of the Taliban, you see, the Afghans have been living in conflict for years.

LBC: Yes, you visited the Northern Alliance, two years ago. Was that a political position?

Because the Tajikistan area in the North is massively Ismaili. The area immediately in the South is massively Ismaili. So if you take the Gorno-Badakshan, which is the area East of Tajikistan, and you take the Afghan Badakshan, it is a common ethnic that speaks the same language with a large majority of Ismailis … So I had a policy, if you will, regional, which consisted of studying the problem in the North-West of Pakistan with a large Ismaili concentration, East of Tajikistan, North-East of Afghanistan, the whole area…. [S]o if you will, there the borders have no significance. It is one entity.

AK: No, it was a geographical position. [Smiles] I will tell you why: Because the Tajikistan area in the North is massively Ismaili. The area immediately in the South is massively Ismaili. So if you take the Gorno-Badakshan, which is the area East of Tajikistan, and you take the Afghan Badakshan, it is a common ethnic that speaks the same language with a large majority of Ismailis — and one had to find a way to stabilise that area which was a high-risk area, not only because of civil war, but also because of the fact that they live in a terribly difficult environment: six months of winter, no important economy, a completely dying agriculture. In 1982, we were facing famine in Tajikistan. And national infrastructure was destroyed. To feed the Tajiks of the East, one had to bring food from Kirgystan, from Kirgystan by road to the East of Tajikistan, all this because it was not even possible to communicate inside the country. Well, this was the situation even before the arrival of the Taliban. The Taliban are a quite recent phenomena. You understand? So I had a policy, if you will, regional, which consisted of studying the problem in the North-West of Pakistan with a large Ismaili concentration, East of Tajikistan, North-East of Afghanistan, the whole area. Mountains dominate that area. So they face the same problem of agriculture, same problem of survival, same problem of insufficient human capacity, same phenomena of isolation, so if you will, there the borders have no significance. It is one entity. Well, it so happened that since, of course the Taliban arrived and started treating all Shias as if they were heretics and all Shias reacted. Voilà!

LBC: So they left. What is the situation of the Ismailis presently in Kabul or in the regions under Taliban regime?

Like all Shias [under the Taliban], we step back, step back, and step back.

AK: Oh well! Like all Shias, we step back, step back, and step back. It happened that the Taliban never conquered two provinces; the Panshir and Badakshan. Voilà! But I have a large refugees population in Pakistan, I have refugees in Iran, in Tajikistan and therefore, if you will, the Ismailis of Afghanistan are among the refugee communities but they did not all leave. Let’s not be mistaken.

LBC: Do you agree with the Western world and particularly the United States that one has to finish the Taliban?

AK: Listen, it is difficult to see any other solution. That is my problem. I don’t see another solution. Honestly, I don’t think that there is. And I will tell you why: one has looked at this question for such a long time now. Everyone has looked at it, not only me, the Arab League and others have also looked at it. I am not naming all of them, but everyone has looked at it. I think the fundamental question is really the question of the future of Afghanistan. One has to ask the question to the Muslim World “What is your visualisation, your wish of the future of Afghanistan?” And I think that if this question is asked from the Muslim World, it will say “We wish a country different from what the Taliban have tried to impose.” Voilà!

LBC: Yes, but one has not yet asked that question to the Muslim World, maybe?

AK: How can we?

LBC: There are surely many ways. No?

AK: I would tell you, that’s going too fast. Even up to six month ago, I have asked that question. I have asked that question to many state leaders, leaders from the government, from the Muslim World, from Central Asia, from Western Europe. Do you know what was the answer? None! There was no answer.

LBC: A question mark?

AK: I haven’t heard from anyone, whosoever …

LBC: Even Iran?

AK: Iran itself, they had a hard time articulating their philosophy on an ever-changing Afghan situation. Well, today it is much easier.

LBC: Do you think that the United States has other goals than the Taliban and Osama bin Laden, in Central Asia? Is there another dimension in the war against terrorism?

[As] I mentioned it in the interview of Le Monde, [in Afghanistan] hours count. There are people that are dying of hunger. Therefore we do not have the right to wait in time, for a more or less vague shaping of the future of Afghanistan. We do not have the right to do this.

AK: I would hope not. And I think there is a consensus around this vision of the future of Afghanistan. And that consensus has been built with Russia, and the other neighbouring countries of Afghanistan, and I think today the debate is “What will be the government that will follow?” Secondly, it is “what is the reconstruction programme?” And my preoccupation is the reconstruction programme, because, and I mentioned it in the interview of Le Monde, hours count. There are people that are dying of hunger. Therefore we do not have the right to wait in time, for a more or less vague shaping of the future of Afghanistan. We do not have the right to do this.

LBC: You have always had very close relations with the White House; because I know the Aga Khans, since Kennedy, have always been well received at the White House, does this persist with President Bush?

[B]ut [the United States] is not at all a privileged country in my life. I would say that Europe, in the future of the Ismaili community, is as much important as the United States …

AK: It persists in the sense that I completed my university studies in the United States, so I have obviously been educated with people who have now important roles in the United States but it is not at all a privileged country in my life. I would say that Europe, in the future of the Ismaili community, is as much important as the United States, or I would say, North America. For different reasons: I give you one example: Canada. Canada for us is a country of great, great importance. Why? Because, Canada has been able to build a pluralistic society, in a modern economy, well, Voilà!

LBC: The United States, no?

AK: A lot less.

LBC: A lot less?

AK: A lot less!

LBC: That means that you have contacted President Bush since September 11?

AK: Let’s say there have been contacts, I don’t want to say with whom or how, but there have been contacts with all the states which are concerned by Afghanistan because they know we have an important Ismaili community in Afghanistan, they know we have a network of humanitarian organisations, they know we have development networks in Pakistan, in Tajikistan, therefore we are able to, I hope, contribute in a significant manner to the reconstruction of Afghanistan. So, by the facts of life, we are amongst those who will have to contribute and we wish to do so.

LBC: So, if there is, for example, a conference, a reflection on the future of Afghanistan, you will apparently be approached?

AK: I see it in a different perspective: What I want first is to hear what the Afghans themselves are saying, province-by-province. I cannot design a programme, for anyone, without first listening. And you can imagine that in a province where there is an agricultural production, which will be destroyed, that is drugs, and other provinces in the high mountains or provinces dominated by an important city, the reconstruction programme will be different. So one has to have the intellectual humility to go and hear, to listen on how these people express themselves in each province. And it is from there that we will build, I think, a common programme. Then we’ll have to divide between us, all those who want to work together, to say “I am taking care of this and that activity or I take partners for this or that activity” and let’s rebuild the country.

LBC: Are you in contact presently with UNO, which is, with Lakhdar Brahimi who is the special delegate for the region, are you in contact with the Northern Alliance, the King …

AK: Listen, I am replying to you: Honestly, I am in contact with all those who should be concerned by Afghanistan. All! And that has been since a long time.

LBC: You are received in the Western world as the Supreme Head of the Ismailis or as a Prince?

AK: Oh, that, I cannot put myself in the head of the people that receive me [smile, laughter] I don’t know how to reply to this. No, I think each country reacts in a different manner. C’est la vie!

[Do you have] a precise goal concerning that religious mission? [A]re you preaching your religion where you are? But of course! Of course, I do. Not only in the Ismaili community but also with others. We have continuous discussions with various religions, other political, academic personalities, of course, because the fundamental problem is the problem of ethics in the modern society. And this problem of ethics in the modern society is a problem of the whole world. And that is where, I think, I wish, I will be able to contribute to the reflection of that question.

LBC: Your Highness, at the end of this conversation, if we want to summarise your entire mission on earth, how can you say it in two words? First, are you preaching your religion where you are? Or you do not have a precise goal concerning that religious mission?

AK: But of course!

LBC: You do preach it …

AK: Of course, I do. Not only in the Ismaili community but also with others. We have continuous discussions with various religions, other political, academic personalities, of course, because the fundamental problem is the problem of ethics in the modern society. And this problem of ethics in the modern society is a problem of the whole world. And that is where, I think, I wish, I will be able to contribute to the reflection of that question.

LBC: And what is your main project in life, in your opinion?

I wish that there were a real, living ethical base, not only a discussed one, but a living one in the modern society because otherwise, be it a Muslim society or a Christian society whatever, I see a society without direction. And that worries me.

AK: I would say there are several. Well, obviously I wish that the Ismaili community lived in peace and with an acceptable quality of life. I wish that the institutions renewed themselves. I have the greatest respect for time and I think that we should anticipate it if we can, and build before time, because otherwise we are short-changed. I wish that there were a real, living ethical base, not only a discussed one, but a living one in the modern society, because otherwise, be it a Muslim society or a Christian society whatever, I see a society without direction. And that worries me. So these are the questions that I ask myself.

LBC: Thank you your Highness, I thank you.

Original in French

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation: Bonsoir Votre Altesse, nous sommes honorés que vous nous donniez un entretien pour la chaîne, LBC. Bon, nous sommes venus à Alep parce que vous êtes là, pour un séjour syrien. Mais bien sûr qu’il y a une occasion, il y avait la cérémonie de la remise du prix de l’architecture. Mais vous avez dit dans votre discours, qui m’a personnellement beaucoup plû sur plusieurs points, on va en parler, vous avez dit que vous considériez la citadelle d’Alep, et je ne sais pas si je traduis très bien ce que vous avez dit, que vous la considérez comme une voie personnelle pour prendre place dans l’histoire et l’héritage.

His Highness the Aga Khan: Oui …

LBC: Qu’est-ce qu’elle représente pour vous personnellement la citadelle, et la Syrie?

AK: En fait j’ai essayé d’expliquer que j’avais un attachement familial avec la Syrie puisque ma famille a été pendant deux siècles syrienne et puis un attachement intellectuel parce que la Syrie représente beaucoup de choses sur le plan philosophique, sur le plan réflexion, histoire de la croyance, qui sont important pour moi, donc c’était une façon de dire “cette cérémonie n’est pas seulement une cérémonie pour les participants au prix d’architecture, c’est aussi une occasion de bonheur pour moi”.

LBC: Oui … c’était une façon de dire que vous avez le même héritage peut-être.

AK: J’ai effectivement le même héritage!

LBC: Voilà! Votre Altesse, dans votre discours d’ouverture au site, j’ai relevé quelques points. Si vous voulez bien..

AK: Oui, je vous en prie.

LBC: Je crois que c’est un peu global ce qui se passe actuellement entre le monde islamique et l’Occident. Vous avez parlé de la route de la soie, puisque vous aviez le groupe Silk Road qui lie l’Asie au Moyen Orient. Alors pour vous, la route de la soie passe où?

AK: Eh bien, écoutez, d’abord il y avait plusieurs routes évidemment; Mais en fait c’est une liaison qui dans sa forme la plus puissante liait la Chine à l’Europe de l’Ouest et donc c’est un couloir humain, culturel, diplomatique, d’États, qui lie tous ces pays par leur voisinage, par leur démographie commune frontalière. Donc c’est quelque chose de très très spécial.

LBC: Oui mais ça c’était dans l’histoire. Actuellement si on veut parler géographiquement parlant, la route de la soie c’est une route qui est tenue par des fanatiques islamiques, ce qu’on appelle la route de la soie.

AK: Non. Non, une partie. Mais pas toute la route de la soie. Une partie, effectivement, passe par des pays où il y a des tensions internes, et des pays où malheureusement il y a la guerre, il faut bien le dire.

LBC: Oui, oui. Et vous pensez que ça bloque un peu ce qui se passe entre l’Asie et le Moyen Orient, et que c’est une des raisons principales de ce blocage.

AK: Bien sûr! Bien sûr! J’ai, pas dans mon discours, mais dans d’autres commentaires sur la situation, j’ai quand même essayé d’expliquer que le phénomène que nous voyons, par exemple en Afghanistan, ne peut être projeté comme si ça sortait de l’essence de l’Islam. Ce n’est pas vrai. C’est un peu comme si je vous disais ou si je disais au monde chrétien, “est-ce que l’Inquisition représente la chrétienté?” Donc, on ne peut pas prendre des situations individuelles, spécifiques, ponctuelles, dans le temps, dans l’histoire, dans la géographie et dire “tout cela représente la totalité de plus d’un milliard de musulmans. Mais malheureusement on présente la situation comme si c’était le cas. Et dans mon discours et le prix d’architecture, entre autres, j’essaye au contraire de montrer que le monde musulman est pluraliste, il l’est depuis des siècles.

LBC: Vous trouvez que le monde musulman est pluraliste? D’ailleurs vous avez parlé d’une place pour le pluralisme dans le monde islamique. La légitimité, vous avez parlé de la légitimité du pluralisme. Est-ce que vous trouvez qu’il existe?

AK: Ah Oui! Historiquement il existe.

LBC: Mais actuellement?

AK: Mais même aujourd’hui, voyez-vous, je crois que quelquefois on a du mal à faire visualiser à un public mondial, ce que c’est le monde musulman. Il ne faut pas confondre l’Afrique subsaharienne avec l’Asie Centrale. Il ne faut pas confondre l’Asie Centrale avec les pays d’Asie tels que la Malaisie et l’Indonésie. Ce sont des populations différentes, qui ont des histoires différentes, qui ont été converties à l’Islam à différentes époques, qui ont évolué depuis cette époque là, qui ont des langues différentes, qui ont des interprétations différentes. Le grand problème, qu’est-ce que c’est? C’est de savoir si cette diversité est une force ou une faiblesse. Et ce que je dis c’est que le monde musulman, enfin ce que je souhaite, c’est que le monde musulman regarde cette situation comme étant une opportunité merveilleuse. Non pas que la diversité nous affaiblisse. C’est là le problème de fond.

LBC: Oui, Mais est-ce qu’il y a une place pour les autres religions dans le monde islamique ?

AK: Oh, bien sûr! L’islam est une foi qui reconnaît les interprétations monothéistes précédentes, le judaïsme, le christianisme. Les “Gens du Livre”, c’est un livre. Donc pour moi il n’y a aucun doute.

LBC: Vous avez parlé du pluralisme, vous avez parlé de la route de la soie, vous avez parlé aussi de l’Occident et du monde islamique. Vous avez une phrase superbe je crois: “Il y a bien sûr quelques différends mais superficiels, en tout cas rien d’aussi profond qui empêcherait une compréhension et un respect mutuels”. Vous savez, vous parlez de l’héritage d’Abraham et de ses principes éthiques, mais vous pensez qu’il n’y a pas eu un crash entre l’Occident et le monde islamique ?

AK: Non, non.

LBC: Ce qui s’est passé entre le 11 septembre et après, ce n’était pas une forme de malentendu historique ?

AK: Je crois qu’on ne peut pas attribuer aux événements du 11 septembre une interprétation qui dit que la foi de l’Islam, ou les cultures de l’Islam, parce qu’il y en a beaucoup, comme il y a beaucoup de cultures fchrétiennes, on ne peut pas me parler de conflit de civilisation. D’abord il faut mettre “des civilisations” au pluriel! Donc il faudrait qu’il y ait conflits entre différentes civilisations qui ont évolué dans l’histoire. Ce n’est pas le cas, on ne peut pas présenter cela aujourd’hui comme le résultat de centaines et de centaines d’années où soit disant, on aurait été en conflit. Ce que je dis c’est que la base d’une entente peut être mise en place à travers l’acceptation de principes d’éthiques qui sont communes dans les fois d’Abraham. Les formes sont différentes. Les principes éthiques, les principes dans lesquelles la société humaine vit, l’attitude vis-à-vis des pauvres, l’attitude vis-à-vis des marginalisés, l’attitude ou la préoccupation d’une société dominée par la partie mâle de la société. Tout cela on le retrouve partout. On le retrouve dans les sociétés chrétiennes, dans les cultures chrétiennes du passé, d’aujourd’hui, dans le monde musulman, la même chose. Donc qu’on aille me dire que tout cela ça représente d’une manière assez simpliste, un conflit, non. Non!

LBC: Si vous voulez bien, on va reparler de tout cela bien après, il faut que je m’arrête pour la publicité, parler un peu des ismaéliens et des Aga Khans et puis on retournera, je crois, sur l’Islam et le défi moderne.

LBC: Votre Altesse, quand on dit “Imam” en principe on imagine un homme barbu avec un turban.. Est-ce que l’Imam chez les ismaéliens, a plutôt un cachet civil ?

AK: Non, je crois qu’on a le souhait d’avoir une fonction qui est équilibrée. Je crois qu’en Islam la notion d’un Imam c’est la notion aussi d’une responsabilité sociale pour ceux qui sont sous sa responsabilité. Et dans le cas des ismailis, j’ai une responsabilité morale et dans la mesure où je peux l’exercer d’une manière efficace, matérielle, pour assurer la qualité de vie des membres de la communauté ismailie. Donc si vous voulez, ce n’est pas seulement sur le plan de la religion que je dois intervenir, c’est également sur le plan de l’éthique. Comment est-ce que l’éthique de la foi se traduit dans la vie quotidienne, voilà!

LBC; Il y a un rôle religieux, spécifiquement religieux dans le chef suprême …

AK: Bien sûr! Bien sûr! Il y a énormément de réflexion qui se fait sur l’histoire, sur l’interprétation. Il faut voir aussi que la communauté ismailie est très internationale et dans l’histoire cette communauté, elle-même est pluraliste. Dans une certaine mesure, elle reflète presque le pluralisme de l’Islam.

LBC: Comme vous-même d’ailleurs! Vous êtes cosmopolite, il faut dire.

AK: Je suis musulman.

LBC: Vous n’avez pas une autre identité? Pas du tout?

AK: Non aucune, aucune!

LBC: Vous n’avez pas des attachements sur votre pays d’origine?

AK: Vous me dites mon pays d’origine, je ne saurais même pas vous le définir. Puisque je suis né en Suisse, j’ai des parents qui sont du monde musulman et du monde chrétien, j’ai fait mon éducation initiale en Afrique puis en Suisse, puis aux États-Unis, j’ai voyagé toute ma vie. Et la seule ligne directrice que j’ai dans ma vie, la dominante, c’est la religion dans laquelle j’ai été élevé.

LBC: Comment un homme peut-il vivre sans ? C’est-à-dire ne pas avoir une terre, une géographie bien déterminée?

AK: Mais au contraire, je suis bien plus libre! Je suis bien plus libre!

LBC: Sûrement, mais vous n’êtes pas curieux de voir le village de vos ancêtres en Inde, ou au Pakistan …

AK: Je dois voir tous les villages où je dois aller voir tout ce qui se passe et les racines que j’ai ne sont pas dans un site spécifique, ils sont dans une fonction.

LBC: Vos fonctions sont comment? Est-ce que vous avez un conseil des ismaéliens de partout, chacun à une spécification de son pays? Comment cela se passe pratiquement ?

AK: Écoutez, bon, ça a évolué dans le temps évidemment, entre ce que mon grand-père a fait avant moi et ce que j’ai fait depuis, il y a eu beaucoup de changement. Mais dans l’ensemble, nous avons eu des structures pour la communauté ismailie, et là où il y a une concentration d’ismailis dans un pays ou dans une région, il y a un conseil national ou un conseil régional. Et ce conseil a une responsabilité, disons, civile. Pour comment la communauté évolue etc. Et ces structures sont gouvernées par une constitution. C’est une constitution universelle. Cette Constitution universelle a des règlements, si vous voulez. “Rules and Regulations” qui sont mis au point selon le pays où la communauté ismailie vit. La communauté ismailie peut vivre dans un pays séculaire majorité hindoue, elle peut vivre dans un pays où la religion nationale est l’islam, elle peut vivre dans un pays où la religion nationale est chrétienne et donc j’ai cherché à ajuster chaque, disons les instruments de gouvernante que la communauté a, à la situation à laquelle elle vit. Et ça fait un peu partie de cette notion de pluralisme sous une interprétation globale, de ce que doit être la structure que nous avons. Bon, ça c’est pour la communauté. Et puis séparément de la communauté mais agissant dans la communauté, il y a le Réseau Aga Khan de Développement. Là ce sont des institutions civiles, qui interviennent dans différents domaines, de nécessité dans la vie, aussi bien pour les ismailis que pour d’autres.

LBC: Oui, mais quel est le but de ces organisations? En tout cas nous allons le voir en reportages pour ne pas trop en parler mais est-ce qu’il y a un but précis, est-ce qu’il y a une mission précise, qui tient ces racines de la religion?

AK: Bien sûr, c’est une communauté qui est construite autour d’une interprétation de l’islam qui est la sienne. Cette interprétation a évolué dans le temps, et évolué géographiquement également. Parce que je crois que c’est une réalité. Toutes les religions évoluent selon le contact des pays, des populations avec lesquelles elle est. Donc c’est la notion d’une fraternité globale de la même interprétation de l’Islam.

LBC: Mais est-ce que vos projets sont plutôt pour les communautés ismailies que d’autres ou dans des régions plutôt musulmanes …

AK: Vous avez raison et je vais vous dire … Il y des priorités. Les priorités, c’est les zones à haut risque. Alors les zones à haut risque sont des zones du monde où les gens risquent la famine, où les niveaux de vie sont beaucoup, beaucoup trop bas pour être acceptables, et à ce moment là, ces zones sont identifiées, et j’interviens dans ces zones. Bon. Dans ces zones, il y a ismailis et non ismailis. L’intervention est faite pour la totalité de la communauté. Sans différence aucune. Au contraire, nous interprétons nos responsabilités morales et éthiques, comme nous obligeant de nous occuper des populations qui sont dans les zones d’activités. Et il y a des situations même où nos institutions sont à majorité largement non ismailies.

LBC. C’est à dire?

AK: Il y a des écoles, des centaines d’écoles dans le monde, que nous gérons où il y a beaucoup plus de non ismailis qu’il n’y a d’ismailis. Bon. Notre système de santé, nos hôpitaux, il y a une vaste majorité de malades non ismailis qui viennent se faire soigner.

LBC: Votre Altesse, vous faites tout ça pour la simple charité, pour faire plaisir à Dieu, parce que … C’est quoi la doctrine? Ça tient de la religion? Ou c’est que les Aga Khans ont une philosophie spéciale?

AK: Non, non, ça part du principe que je dois intervenir pour aider là où la qualité de la vie n’est pas acceptable. Alors que ce soit au Pakistan du Nord-Ouest, que ce soit au Mozambique, que ce soit en Afghanistan ou au Tadjikistan. L’intervention doit se faire là où il y a la plus grande demande. Bon. Vous pensez que sur les décennies depuis que mon grand-père est mort, la situation a énormément évolué. Donc par exemple le cas de l’Ouganda: L’Ouganda avec Idi Amin, catastrophe nationale, catastrophe régionale. Parce que ça a créé des remous de risques très graves pour toute l’Afrique orientale. Les émigrés s’en vont, musulmans, non musulmans, nationaux ou pas nationaux, rien n’y a fait. Bon. Quinze ou vingt ans après, le régime change. Un nouveau président vient au pouvoir. Qu’est-ce qu’il fait, il me contacte immédiatement en me disant “Revenez m’aider à reconstruire mon pays”. Donc, si vous voulez, le temps fait que ces situations changent, elles ne sont pas les mêmes. Et donc l’institution que je représente, l’Imamat, doit se régler selon les besoins. Elle doit aller au-delà de cela, elle doit anticiper les situations. Elle doit être en mesure de dire telle et telle zone du monde est à haut risque social, économique, politique que ce soit. D’autres zones sont stables. Ce sont des zones où la population vit dans des conditions acceptables.

LBC: C’est différent avec la communauté, c’est à dire, tout ça c’est sous le parrainage de la communauté ismaélite ou c’est la Fondation Aga Khan. Il n’y a pas de différence?

AK: Non, non, je ne dirais pas ça. Je dirais, si vous prenez par exemple le Tadjikistan, le Tadjikistan a vécu dans une guerre civile qui vient de se terminer. Dans le Tadjikistan, il y a une partie qui est à haute densité ismailie et une autre partie qui est à haute densité non ismailie. Bon. La totalité de cette partie représente une population à haut risque parce qu’elle vit dans des conditions économiques de pauvreté atroce. Bon, j’interviens pour qui? J’interviens pour toute cette population.

LBC: Et qui finance tout cela?

AK: L’Imamat, plus tous nos collaborateurs, nous avons énormément de partenaires dans nos programmes. Nous ne pourrions jamais être efficaces dans tous les domaines où nous souhaitons l’être avec seulement nos ressources à nous. Ce n’est pas possible.

LBC: Je vais vous poser une question, je crois que des centaines de journalistes vous ont posé cette question: Pourquoi vous avez hérité de votre grand-père Aga Khan III et non pas votre père qui était encore vivant?

AK: Je ne peux que vous dire ce qu’il a dit. Mon grand-père a été Imam pendant soixante- douze ans de sa vie. Donc à l’âge de 8 ans il était l’Imam des ismailis, jusqu’à l’âge de quatre-vingts ans.

LBC: C’est possible à l’âge de huit ans d’être chef suprême d’une communauté. Comment ça se passe? Il n’y a pas un Conseil qui veille …

AK: Bien sûr, bien sûr. Dans toutes les structures religieuses ou autre, il y a des structures. Mon grand-père est mort après soixante-douze ans d’Imamat, et il a laissé dans son testament une explication: Et il a dit, voilà, le monde change et le monde change à une rapidité énorme. Et je veux être suivi par quelqu’un qui est beaucoup plus jeune que moi. Parce que ce quelqu’un aura, je l’espère, la possibilité de réagir face à ce monde qui change, avec une nouvelle vision. Et c’est ce qui s’est passé, parce que quand il est mort, il avait quatre-vingts ans, moi j’avais vingt ans. J’étais encore à l’université.

LBC: Et comment votre père a pris la chose?

AK: Il a été d’une rigueur, d’une loyauté absolument remarquable. Remarquable.

LBC: Et vous avez nommé votre successeur? Comment ça se passe?

AK: L’Imam nomme son successeur et puis bon, il est de son choix jusqu’à son dernier jour.

LBC: Donc on ne connaît pas le successeur en principe?

AK: Je n’en parle pas.

LBC: Et pourquoi votre grand-père a quitté son pays d’origine?

AK: Parce que je crois qu’il a vécu à une époque où il craignait que le marasme des pays du tiers-monde ne vienne gêner ce qu’il voulait faire pour sa communauté. Et il a pris une décision de dire, si je veux servir ma communauté, je suis obligé d’aller chercher les compétences du monde moderne, les associations du monde moderne, les nations de développement du monde moderne pour les apporter à ma communauté. Et c’est ce qu’il a effectivement fait.

LBC: En tout cas il y a beaucoup de sa communauté qui l’ont suivi en Afrique je crois?

AK: Non, non, attendez, vous parlez de mon grand-père? Mon grand-père a quitté les Indes pour aller s’installer en Europe. Voilà! Les ismailis sont restés dans la plupart des pays ou ils étaient.

LBC: Ils sont restés là-bas?

AK: Oui quand mon grand-père est mort, il y avait peut-être en Angleterre, une centaine d’ismailis.

LBC: Pourquoi on dit que les Ismailis sont des grands hommes d’affaire dans le monde?

AK: Oh, je crois que c’est peut-être un peu une notion, une notion des ismailis qui étaient les plus en vue. Qui étaient les plus en vue! Depuis les années soixante, soixante-dix, la communauté a beaucoup beaucoup évolué. D’abord il y a un grand pourcentage de la communauté qui vie dans des zones rurales qui ne sont absolument pas urbanisées. Deuxièmement, il y a une nouvelle génération ou plusieurs nouvelles générations de professionnels, d’hommes et de femmes qui ont une éducation moderne, qui sont bilingue, trilingue et qui ont des activités professionnelles. Aussi bien en occident que dans d’autres pays. Donc si vous voulez, cette notion de communauté d’affaires ne correspond plus du tout à la réalité.

LBC: Et pourquoi est-ce qu’on a l’impression que les ismailis, et c’est bien, je crois que c’est un avantage, ce sont des gens plutôt modernes, modernes dans la vision occidentale des choses.

AK: Je crois que ça revient à la même question qu’on a discuté tout à l’heure. Revenons en arrière. Les occidentaux; Comment ont-ils appris ce que c’était la culture, la philosophie grecque? Ils l’ont appris comment? Ils sont allés chercher chez les philosophes, les scientistes, les théologues, ils sont allés chercher dans l’intelligentsia musulmane de l’époque, les traductions qui avaient disparu dans leurs états d’origine et le monde musulman a été le monde de transition pour que l’Occident apprenne sa propre histoire. Bon. Aujourd’hui qu’est-ce qui se passe? Moi je dis que le monde musulman, et en tout cas la communauté ismailie, nous ne devons pas vivre en dehors des réalités de notre monde. Au contraire nous devons les absorber, les faire travailler pour nous, et en bénéficier. Et s’il y a des systèmes d’organisation de la société humaine d’aujourd’hui qui fonctionnent bien, ou en tout cas mieux que d’autres, nous serions plutôt peu intelligents pour ne pas dire plus, de voir qu’est-ce que nous pouvons apprendre, qu’est-ce que nous pouvons intégrer, qu’est-ce que nous pouvons remodeler. Parce qu’on n’a pas besoin de prendre tout. Il faut prendre ce qui nous sert. Et c’est là où ce rapport avec l’Occident me semble important. On ne perd pas son identité, on ne perd pas sa religion …

LBC: Parce que vous n’êtes pas complètement dissous dans les sociétés dans lesquelles vous vivez …

AK: Absolument pas. La vaste majorité de la communauté n’est pas en Occident, et sa première langue n’est pas une langue occidentale. Nous avons fait de l’anglais, notre seconde langue. Ça oui! Parce que dans les années soixante, soixante-dix il fallait avoir une politique de langue. Si une communauté n’avait pas une politique de langue, elle se dissociait du potentiel de développement. Et l’anglais est la langue que nous avons choisie. Donc aujourd’hui la communauté ismailie parle le farsi, l’arabe, le kiswahili, l’anglais, le français, le portugais etc. Et puis il y a une langue qui est de plus en plus commune, c’est leur seconde langue, pour une grande majorité c’est l’anglais.

LBC: Durant vos réflexions, vous avez pensé que si votre grand-père n’avait pas quitté l’Inde, comment aurait été le visage des ismailis dans le monde?

AK: S’il n’avait pas quitté l’Inde, je ne peux que spéculer. Mais je pense que la communauté, et pas seulement la communauté ismailie, qui tourne le dos à des civilisations parallèles mais pas nécessairement les mêmes, mais qui sont puissantes, constructrices, efficaces, qui ont créé des institutions qui se renouvellent, je crois que c’est pas agir dans l’intérêt des populations concernées. Et je n’ai aucune honte personnellement, mais aucune de quelque nature que ce soit de dire: Si je dois aujourd’hui refaire le chemin que les chrétiens on fait dans leur histoire, pour apprendre du monde musulman, et bien, eh alors? Qu’est-ce que ça peut faire?

LBC: Socialement parlant, vous avez aussi quelques différends avec les autres communautés musulmanes. La polygamie est interdite chez les ismailis … et depuis quand tout ça?

AK: C’est mon grand-père qui a pris cette décision, et je l’ai maintenue. “Interdite”, c’est peut être pas le mot qui correspond, nous pensons que c’est une pratique qu’il faut dissuader. Mais elle n’est pas interdite, vous comprenez. Chaque famille décidera en fin de compte de ce qu’elle veut faire ou pas faire. Et c’est ce qui se passe. Mais je pense que pour l’avenir de la communauté, cette notion d’avoir une seule famille dans le monde moderne, parce que je souligne le monde moderne, je ne parle pas du passé, je pense que c’est une structure sociale qui est bonne. Aujourd’hui mon inquiétude c’est pas ça. Mon inquiétude c’est la notion de la famille unique qui est en train de se détruire. Voilà! On est bien au-delà de la polygamie aujourd’hui. Aujourd’hui nous sommes face à une partie de notre monde qui accepte que des enfants soient nés hors de la famille.

LBC: Et c’est pour ca que vous avez deux mariages? Le mariage civil et le mariage religieux dans votre communauté?

AK: Non, non, non. Ça c’est une forme mais en fait le mariage n’est pas un sacrement en Islam.

LBC: Oui?

AK: C’est un rapport contractuel en réalité entre un homme et une femme.

LBC: Justement.

AK: Oui. Voila.

LBC: Mais c’est parce que vous êtes en Europe que vous faites cela?

AK: Non, parce qu’il est devenu une tradition même dans les communautés musulmanes non ismailies qu’on demande la bénédiction sur le mariage etc.

LBC: Votre Altesse, votre femme est nommée directement Bégum ou vous devez la nommer vous-même?

AK: Elle a automatiquement le titre … C’est un titre honorifique si vous voulez, d’une femme dans une position de haut rang, voilà!

LBC: Est-ce qu’elle est voilée?

AK: Non, elle n’est pas voilée.

LBC: Êtes-vous touché par la politique en général?

AK: Je ne suis pas un homme politique par contre la politique influe sur tous les pays où il y a une communauté ismailie, elle influe sur les organisations internationales et sur le système financier international, elle influe sur les priorités que se donnent les pays occidentaux ou les pays en voie de développement donc la réponse et tangentiellement: oui. Mais pas directement.

LBC: Plus précisément, le Moyen Orient? Vous avez des positions claires concernant le conflit Israëlo-Arabe, concernant Jérusalem.

AK: Non, c’est une question qui n’est pas courante dans ma vie puisque je ne suis pas engagé là, je suis beaucoup plus engagé en Afghanistan, puisqu’il y a une communauté ismailie qui est là et dans tous les pays voisins. Bon, pour ce qui est de la situation au Moyen Orient, je..

LBC: Il n’y a pas en Palestine?

AK: Non.

LBC: Non, pas du tout?

AK: Non, Non. Bon, j’ai été étudiant en histoire, j’ai lu le “Balfour Declaration”, j’ai lu l’Accord Sykes-Picot quand j’étais étudiant, il avait à peine été rendu public, donc si vous voulez, l’histoire je la connais. Et elle est terrible. Elle est terrible. Mais on a un héritage historique affreux qu’il faut résoudre. Il faut le résoudre. Et je crois que cette situation au Moyen Orient reflète un problème de fond qui est que lorsque vous laissez une situation se dégrader décennie après décennie, elle finit par devenir un problème global. Et il faut maintenant trouver une solution. Cette situation a duré beaucoup trop longtemps, mais beaucoup trop longtemps!

LBC: Est-ce que vous avez une idée précise de la paix, comment vous la voyez? Jérusalem pour vous, est-ce qu’elle représente pour vous une ville spéciale pour l’Islam par exemple?

AK: Mais bien sûr, il ne peut pas en être autrement. Vous dire que j’ai une vision précise du statut légal de la ville de Jérusalem, non, je n’ai pas de vision précise. Vous me demandez la question pour l’Afghanistan, est-ce que j’ai une vision de ce qui doit être la suite de l’Afghanistan, je vous dirais oui, vous comprenez, parce que je suis directement impliqué.

LBC: Mais au Moyen Orient, non?

AK: Pas directement.

LBC: Malgré la communauté ismailie en Syrie.

AK: En Syrie. Nous sommes impliqués par la position syrienne puisque chaque communauté fait partie du psyché national, vous comprenez.

LBC: Alors on va en parler de l’Afghanistan, mais avant, comment expliquez-vous le jihad?

AK: Mais comment voyez-vous le jihad, quelle est la définition que vous voulez, vous, donner au jihad?

LBC: La guerre sainte, ce qu’on a appelle la guerre sainte depuis l’histoire. Et l’interprétation actuelle, bien sûr.

AK: Je crois d’abord qu’il y a plusieurs interprétations actuelles. Je ne crois pas qu’il y ait dans le monde musulman une seule définition du jihad. Le mot pour moi est utilisé beaucoup trop souvent, et dans beaucoup trop de domaines. Mais le jihad avant tout c’est une discipline personnelle. Au départ, c’est la recherche de l’amélioration de soi-même. C’est à dire que c’est un effort personnel dans la vie. Ça c’est une définition. Une autre définition c’est la guerre contre les non croyants. Mais là il faut définir qui sont les non croyants. Bon, autre définition. Troisième définition, c’est la guerre contre ceux qui s’attaquent contre une communauté musulmane, qui victimisent une communauté musulmane. Autre définition. Donc si vous voulez, dans la notion de jihad, je crois qu’il faut faire très attention de ne pas donner à ce mot une seule interprétation. Ce mot est utilisé dans différentes situations de notre monde aujourd’hui, il faut bien le dire.

LBC: Les non croyants pour vous c’est qui?

AK: Si je retourne très en arrière, très en arrière, je pense qu’il faut dire que les gens du livre, les “Ahl al-Kitab” ce sont les monothéistes. Ça c’est la définition de base. Bon aujourd’hui je crois qu’en Islam il faut admettre que dans la vie sociale nous sommes obligés et nous devons accepter la notion d’une responsabilité sociale élargie. C’est celle que j’interprète. Et je la crois vraie. Je dirais plus que cela, je crois que dans l’histoire musulmane lorsque des situations se sont présentées de ce genre là, souvent la période islamique en question a été la plus belle. C’est très étrange, c’est un phénomène de l’histoire mais c’est une réalité.

LBC: Oui, elle a été plus belle pour les musulmans non?

AK: Mais oui, c’est ce que j’ai dit. Parce que c’est l’humanisme de l’Islam qui a fait qu’on a construit une société où tout le monde était heureux de vivre dans cette société. Est-ce que ce n’est pas cela le souhait que nous devons avoir?

LBC: Quand vous dites “non croyants”, vous parlez des “Gens du Livre” ou des monothéistes, bon, il y a eu le jihad en Afghanistan contre le régime soviétique donc contre le communisme, donc des gens en principe non croyants. Donc vous interprétez ce jihad comme bon pour la cause musulmane?

AK: Le jihad de l’Afghanistan? Écoutez, il est certain que je ne pouvais pas être en faveur d’une invasion que ce soit en Afghanistan ou ailleurs. Voyez-vous? La notion de l’invasion est une notion qui pour moi est une notion inacceptable. Avec le recul du temps, si vous demandez aux Russes d’aujourd’hui, ils vous diraient, “on n’aurait jamais dû le faire.” Par contre quand vous me parlez d’une jihad entre musulmans, j’ai beaucoup de difficultés à accepter cela, beaucoup!

LBC: Bon, et maintenant s’il va y avoir une invasion américaine de l’Afghanistan, comment vous allez voir tout cela?

AK: Elle est déjà en place. Elle est déjà en place!

LBC: Oui, alors qu’est-ce que vous en pensez?

AK: Je crois que malheureusement le monde civilisé n’a pas réussi à changer les normes sociales, éthiques, humaines qu’on a voulu imposer à l’Afghanistan par le mouvement Taliban. Et là je veux être clair: Tout le monde qui a essayé de changer cela, musulman et non musulman, ils ont tous failli. On ne peut pas dire que c’est une faillite unilatérale d’un monde musulman ou d’un monde chrétien. C’est le monde civilisé comme je l’entends qui n’a pas réussi à changer cette situation. Aujourd’hui il faut se poser la question, mais qu’est-ce que l’on souhaite pour l’Afghanistan? Il faut voir cette situation de conflit, à quoi elle va porter? Et c’est là où je me suis engagé, et je m’engage tous les jours, pour essayer de contribuer à la visualisation d’un Afghanistan pacifié, pluraliste, moderne, stable et où la démographie originale, enfin, la démographie d’avant le conflit puisse se rétablir. Il y a quand même quatre millions de réfugiés qu’il faut rapatrier. Donc si vous voulez, le problème que je me pose c’est que cette situation militaire, elle est là. Mais le plus important c’est comment est-ce qu’on reconstruit l’Afghanistan? S’il fallait passer par cette tragédie, et que la population afghane se trouve dans la situation où elle est aujourd’hui, qu’est-ce qu’on peut souhaiter? Qu’est-ce qu’on peut prier pour cette population? Et c’est là où je crois que, si vous voulez, le Ummah peut arriver à un accord et doit contribuer à cette visualisation.

LBC: Donc vous êtes plutôt optimiste?

AK: Ah non!

LBC: Vous dites que c’est possible. Moi je crois que tout le problème c’est qu’on n’arrive pas à trouver ou à mettre en place un gouvernement à la place des Talibans. Je crois que c’est le problème des États-Unis, c’est le problème du Pakistan, d’Iran et de tout le monde.

AK: Écoutez, je crois qu’il faut voir au-delà. Je ne suis pas optimiste parce que je n’aime pas la guerre. Mais, nous y sommes. Je suis optimiste dans la visualisation de ce qui peut être mis en place en Afghanistan parce que je suis convaincu qu’on peut trouver un consensus de vision de la grande majorité des Afghans et des pays voisins. J’en suis profondément convaincu. Je pense en plus, que cette vision de consensus soit soutenue d’une manière vigoureuse, mais vigoureuse, pour la reconstruction de l’Afghanistan. Moralement il est intolérable que les Afghans continuent encore des décennies d’années à vivre comme cela, c’est pas possible!

LBC: “À vivre comme cela”, c’est-à-dire sous le régime des Talibans?

AK: Non, en guerre civile! Depuis l’invasion russe, jusqu’à la situation de guerre interne, jusqu’à la position des Talibans. Vous pensez que les (gens dans) l’Afghanistan, ça fait des années qu’ils vivent dans des situations de conflit.

LBC: Oui, vous avez visité l’Alliance du Nord, il y a deux ans? Est-ce que c’était une position politique?

AK: Non, c’était une position géographique. [Petit rire] Je vais vous dire pourquoi: Parce que la zone du Tadjikistan au Nord est massivement ismailie. La zone juste au Sud, est massivement ismailie. Donc si vous prenez le Gorno-Badakshan qui est la zone Est du Tadjikistan et vous prenez le Badakshan afghan, c’est une ethnie commune, qui parle la même langue, grande majorité d’ismailis. Et il fallait trouver le moyen de stabiliser cette zone là qui était la zone à plus haut risque. Non pas uniquement de la guerre civile, mais du fait qu’ils vivent dans un environnement terriblement difficile. Six mois d’hiver, aucune économie importante, une agriculture complètement défaillante. En 1982, on était face à la famine au Tadjikistan. Et l’infrastructure nationale détruite. Pour nourrir les Tadjiks de l’Est il fallait emmener la nourriture par le Kirgystan, du Kirgystan par la route vers le Tadjikistan de l’Est. Parce qu’on ne pouvait même pas faire la communication à l’intérieur du pays. Bon. Ça c’était une situation qui était avant l’arrivée des Talibans. Les Talibans, c’est un phénomène assez récent finalement. Vous comprenez? Donc moi j’avais une politique, si vous voulez, régionale qui consistait à étudier le problème dans le Nord-Ouest du Pakistan, grande concentration ismailie, l’Est du Tadjikistan, le Nord-Est de l’Afghanistan. C’est toute une zone. Et c’est une zone qui est dominée par la montagne. Donc, même problème d’agriculture, même problème de survie, même problème d’insuffisance de capacité humaine, même phénomène d’isolation, donc, si vous voulez, les frontières là n’ont pas grand sens. C’est une entité. Bon, il s’est trouvé que depuis, évidemment quand les Talibans sont arrivés là, et qu’ils ont commencé à traiter tous les Shias comme s’ils étaient des hérétiques, tous les Shias ont réagi. Voilà!

LBC: Ils ont quitté donc.. Quelle est la situation des ismailis actuellement à Kaboul ou dans les régions sous le régime Taliban ?

AK: Eh bien! Comme tous les Shias, on s’est replié, replié, replié. Il s’est trouvé que deux provinces du Tadjikistan n’ont jamais été conquises par les Talibans, c’est le Panshir et le Badakshan. Voilà! Mais j’ai une grande population de réfugiés au Pakistan, j’ai des réfugiés en Iran, au Tadjikistan et donc si vous voulez, les ismailis d’Afghanistan font partie de communautés réfugiées mais ils ne sont pas tous partis. Il ne faut pas se tromper là-dessus.

LBC: Vous êtes d’accord avec le monde occidental et les États-Unis en particulier qu’il faut en finir avec les Talibans?

AK: Écoutez, il est difficile de voir une autre solution. C’est cela mon problème. Je ne vois pas d’autre solution. Et je ne crois pas qu’il y en ait, honnêtement. Et je vais vous dire pourquoi: On s’est penché sur cette question depuis assez longtemps maintenant. Tout le monde s’y est penché, pas que moi, la Ligue Arabe et d’autres, je ne les nomme pas tous, tout le monde s’y est penché là-dessus. Je crois que la question de fond c’est justement la question de l’avenir de l’Afghanistan. Il faut poser la question au monde musulman en lui disant “quelle est votre visualisation de l’avenir de l’Afghanistan que vous souhaitez”. Et je pense que si on posait cette question au monde musulman, il dirait “nous voulons un pays diffèrent de celui qu’ont voulu imposer les Talibans”. Voilà!

LBC: Oui, mais on n’a pas posé la question encore au monde musulman peut-être?

AK: Comment on le ferait?

LBC: Il y a plusieurs façons quand même?

AK; Je vous dirais, c’est aller vite, même jusqu’il y a six mois, j’ai posé la question. J’ai posé la question à beaucoup de Chefs d’État, chefs du gouvernement, du monde musulman, d’Asie Centrale, de l’Europe de l’Ouest. Et vous savez quelle était la réponse? Aucune! Il n’y avait pas de réponse.

LBC: Un point d’interrogation?

AK: Je n’ai pas entendu de qui que ce soit …

LBC: Même l’Iran?

AK: L’Iran, eux -mêmes ils avaient du mal à articuler leur philosophie sur une situation afghane qui changeait tout le temps. Bon, aujourd’hui c’est beaucoup plus facile.

LBC: Vous pensez que les États-Unis ont d’autres buts que le régime Taliban et Osama bin Laden, dans l’Asie Centrale, il y a une autre dimension de la guerre contre le terrorisme?

AK: Je souhaiterais que non. Et je crois qu’il y a consensus autour de cette vision de l’avenir de l’Afghanistan. Et ce consensus a été construit avec la Russie, les autres pays voisins de l’Afghanistan et je crois qu’aujourd’hui le débat c’est “Quel est le gouvernement qui va suivre”, deuxièmement, c’est “quel est le programme de reconstruction”. Et ma préoccupation c’est ce programme de reconstruction, parce que, et je l’ai dit dans l’interview du Monde, les heures comptent. On a des gens qui meurent de faim. Donc on n’a pas le droit de laisser dans le temps, de se dessiner sur l’horizon une image plus ou moins floue de l’avenir de l’Afghanistan. On n’a pas le droit de le faire.

LBC: Vous avez toujours des relations assez proches de la Maison Blanche parce que je sais que les Aga Khans depuis Kennedy ont été toujours très bien reçus à la Maison Blanche, est-ce que ça persiste avec le président Bush?

AK: Ça persiste dans le sens que j’ai fait mon éducation universitaire aux États-Unis, j’ai donc nécessairement été éduqué avec des personnes qui maintenant ont des rôles importants aux États-Unis mais ce n’est pas du tout un pays privilégié dans ma vie. Je dirais que l’Europe, dans l’avenir de la communauté ismailie, est tout aussi importante que les États-Unis, ou je dirais, l’Amérique du Nord. Pour différentes raisons: Je vous donne un exemple – le Canada – le Canada pour nous est un pays d’une très très grande importance. Pourquoi? Parce que le Canada a su construire dans une économie moderne, une société pluraliste. Eh bien voilà!.

LBC: Les États-Unis, non?

AK: Beaucoup moins.

LBC: Beaucoup moins?

AK: Beaucoup moins!

LBC: C’est-à-dire vous avez dû contacter le président Bush depuis le 11 septembre?

AK: Disons qu’il y a des contacts, je ne veux pas dire avec qui ou comment mais il y a des contacts avec tous les États qui sont concernés par l’Afghanistan puisqu’ils savent qu’il y a une communauté ismailie importante en Afghanistan, ils savent que nous avons un réseau d’organisations humanitaires en Afghanistan, ils savent que nous avons des réseaux de développement au Pakistan, au Tadjikistan, et donc nous sommes en mesure, j’espère, de contribuer d’une manière significative à la reconstruction de l’Afghanistan. Donc par la force des choses, nous sommes parmi ceux qui vont devoir contribuer et nous le souhaitons.

LBC: Donc s’il va y avoir, par exemple, un congrès ou une réflexion sur l’avenir de l’Afghanistan vous allez être apparemment reçu.

AK: Moi je commence par une autre façon: moi ce que je veux c’est d’abord entendre ce que les Afghans eux-mêmes disent, province par province. Je ne sais pas construire un programme, pour qui que ce soit, sans écouter d’abord. Et, vous imaginez que dans les provinces où il y a une production agricole qui va être détruite, il faut bien le dire – la drogue- et d’autres provinces qui sont dans la haute montagne ou des provinces qui sont dominées par une ville, le programme de reconstruction va être différent. Donc il faut avoir l’humilité intellectuelle pour aller entendre, écouter, que ces gens-là s’expriment dans chaque province. Et c’est de là que nous construirons, je crois, un programme commun. Et puis il faudra se diviser entre nous, tous ceux qui veulent travailler ensemble, pour dire “je m’occupe de telle et telle activité ou je prends des partenaires pour telle ou telle activité” et il faut reconstruire le pays.

LBC: Est-ce que vous êtes en contact actuellement avec l’ONU c’est-à-dire avec Lakhdar Brahimi qui est le délégué spécial pour la région, vous êtes en contact avec l’Alliance du Nord, avec le Roi …

AK; Écoutez, je vous réponds: franchement, je suis en contact avec tous ceux qui doivent être concernés par l’Afghanistan. Tous! Et cela depuis longtemps.

LBC: Vous êtes reçu dans le monde occidental comme chef suprême des ismailis ou comme prince?

AK: Oh, ça, je ne peux pas me mettre dans la tête des gens qui me reçoivent [petit rire].. Euh … Je ne sais pas comment répondre à cela. Non je crois que chaque pays réagit d’une manière différente, c’est la vie.

LBC: Votre Altesse, à la fin de cet entretien, si on veut résumer toute votre mission sur terre, comment pouvez-vous le dire en deux mots? Premièrement, est-ce que vous prêchez votre religion là où vous êtes? Ou vous n’avez pas de but précis concernant cette mission religieuse?

AK: Mais bien sûr!

LBC: Vous la prêchez …

AK: Bien sûr et avec d’autres. Pas seulement dans la communauté ismailie. Nous avons des discussions continues avec différentes religions, d’autres différentes personnalités politiques, académiques. Bien sûr. Parce que le problème de fond, c’est le problème de l’éthique dans la société moderne. Et ce problème de l’éthique dans la société moderne, ce n’est pas un problème musulman, c’est un problème du monde entier. Et c’est là où, je crois que, j’espère, que je pourrais contribuer à la réflexion sur cette question.

LBC: Et quel est votre projet principal de votre vie, à votre avis?

AK: Je dirais qu’il y en a plusieurs. Bon, évidement je souhaite que lspan class=a communau Lté ismailie vive en paix et dans des conditions de qualité de vie acceptable. Je souhaite que les institutions se renouvellent. J’ai le plus grand respect pour le temps et je crois qu’il faut l’anticiper si on peut et construire en avance du temps, parce que sinon on est pris de court. Je souhaite qu’il y ait une base éthique, réelle, vécue, pas seulement discutée, mais vécue dans la société moderne. Parce que sans cela, que ce soit la société musulmane ou la société chrétienne, quelle qu’elle soit, je vois une société sans direction et ça me préoccupe. Donc voilà les questions que je me pose …

LBC: Merci Votre Altesse, je vous remercie.

SOURCES