[Translation] In fact, in the Shiite credence, one exalts the value of the intellect, of the spiritual guide, therefore of interpretation. But Western thought tends to confuse the bond between spirituality and secularism with a sort of compromise between State and Church. These are different levels, which involve the individual and the community in which one lives, not the political authority of the State. The Qur’an prohibits judging the way in which another Muslim practises faith, but it also prohibits the enforcement of a religious practice or of a faith.

In the world of Islam, which is nearly a fifth of the Earth’s population, there are significant examples of religious practices which conform to a moral concept of the faith. The Qur’an edicts the ethics of responsibility as an obligation for those who have civilian authority, to enhance the well being and the development of their community. This is something which the Taliban have not done and it is because of this that their regime condemns itself. In these conditions, Islam even says that trust in authority must be denied.

ENGLISH TRANSLATION FROM FOREIGN LANGUAGE: We believe this interview or article was originally in French or English, however we regret that only an English translation from a foreign language is available. We would be very grateful if any of our readers who may have the original version in French or English, if any, would kindly share it with us. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

MAYBE INCOMPLETE: Although extensive portions from this interview are available below, they do not appear to, or may not, comprise the entire interview and we would be very grateful if any of our readers who may have the complete transcript would kindly share it with us. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

Interviewer: Massimo Nava in Aiglemont

Unknown translator — Click here for the original in Italian

Introduction

Says the leader of the Ismailis: “This is not a conflict between civilisations but of reciprocal prejudices and stereotypes.”

The Taliban:

Through the Qur’an, they condemn themselves. The Qur’an prohibits the enforcement of a religious practice or of a faith. This is why the regime of the Taliban condemns itself, but it is not right to associate it with Bin Laden and to associate Bin Laden with Islam.

The veil:

This is a tradition which respects women. Certainly differences with the Western world exist, but one must consider the essence and the ethical significance of rules and principals. The veil for women is a tradition which precedes Islam, and was introduced as a sign of respect.

Interview

The interview on the attack on terrorism: The leader is the 49th descendant of Mohammad, one of the principal spiritual leaders of Muslim Shiites:

Religious extremism may come about through the Arab world’s sense of frustration of unsolved problems…. I am amazed by the ignorance on Islam.

This is not a conflict between civilisations but of reciprocal prejudices and stereotypes.

He is one of the spiritual leaders of Islam who best knows the land and the people of Central Asia, the area which holds the world in suspense. He is the Imam, the religious leader and guide of the Ismailis, whose communities are spread in various countries of Asia and Africa, but also in Europe and in North America. Throughout Iran, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and West China, there are more than five million Ismailis.

The “Corriere” met him at Aiglemont, his residence — cum — secretariat for the multiple institutional activities. This is a splendid estate within the forests which surround the enchanting castle of Chantilly, north of Paris. The suburban quarters of the Maghreb seem far away, but so close, both in France as in the entire West, to the heart of the problem, the confrontation between religions and cultures, which is not a direct consequence of well being and of knowledge, for this land which favours intolerance and exclusion.

From this sort of directorate, the Aga Khan organises his “Development Networks” of initiatives and institutions dedicated to the enhancement of the living conditions of the Developing Countries. It functions with humanitarian aid to economic development, to education, to health, with the conviction that:

wherever in the world, the ethnic and religious instability is largely due to poverty. If there is poverty, there is no hope in life. The tensions, the ethnic and religious conflicts, the violence, all find fertile soil in poverty and ignorance.

Massimo Nava: Does the same apply to the Taliban regime?

Around 750,000 to one million Ismailis lived in Afghanistan prior to the war, and our people have also been forced to flee. In Afghanistan, hundreds of thousands have been persecuted; we have been direct spectators of a human and civilian disaster.

His Highness the Aga Khan: I know the situation well. The Taliban are a peculiar phenomenon which originates pivots around the Arab world and Pakistan. They have imposed an interpretation of Islam which had never been imposed on the Afghan population before and which has never existed in the theological context of the country until some ten years ago. They are a singular reality which cannot be considered representative of the Islamic community of the area. We have been engaged in this area for years, where a part of our community is concentrated. Around 750,000 to one million Ismailis lived in Afghanistan prior to the war, and our people have also been forced to flee. In Afghanistan, hundreds of thousands have been persecuted; we have been direct spectators of a human and civilian disaster.

MN: How do you explain the tie between the religious regime and the terrorism of Bin Laden?

AK: The conflict with the Soviet Union after the Red Army’s invasion; the help and the military training received, also from the West to the Mujahiddin, voluntary soldiers which came from other countries, and, after the Soviets withdrew, the civil war between ethnic fractions.

Afghanistan was left to its own destiny. There was no economic assistance, no support for the reconstruction of the political institutions, no international initiative. It was a destiny which even the ex-Soviet Republics which surround the northern frontiers risked; there, the organisational and political weakness could have favoured the Taliban insurgence.

When we started to work in this area, we were immersed in a scenario of immense poverty, of cultural conflicts and of latent tensions between ethnic and religious groups which were forced to live in close contact within social relationships. For instance, in the Central Asian republics, the Russians had assured social equality to women, but a few kilometres away, the women started to live in accordance to local traditions.

Afghanistan, abandoned by all and conquered by the Taliban, became an immense training camp for international terrorism. It was used in various situations, many times, and for diverse motives, and even today it is still the huge crossroad for drugs.

MN: But the Taliban regime bases itself on a rigid interpretation of the Qur’an; in a certain sense, the regime is an absolutist theocracy. And Bind Laden, who the Taliban protect, is reflected as a hero of the Holy War. Terrorism seems also the son of religious extremists.

AK: The planet’s conflicts are not a problem which involves only Islam. One needs only to reread history and observe today’s World. Ireland, Sri Lanka, Kashmir Chechnya, Balkans, Africa. Religion can become an instrument of conflict, but rarely, in today’s world is it a principal cause.

[T]ypes of religious extremism may also come about through the Arab world’s sense of frustration on unsolved problems, first and foremost that of the Palestinians.

It is true that types of religious extremism may also come about through the Arab world’s sense of frustration on unsolved problems, first and foremost that of the Palestinians. When suffering and internal conflicts are endless, inevitably, they become international. But the outcome of the Taliban’s regime in Afghanistan is failure: of the civil world, of the international community.

No individual, no country or international organisation, irrelevant of whether it is Islamic or not, which has undertaken negotiations with them — and there have been many — has been successful in convincing them that their ways were contrary to the principals and objectives acceptable to a modern human society.

MN: How do you explain the wariness of the Islamic world in expressing an explicit and total condemnation of the Taliban?

AK: When one speaks of Islam there is often an unfounded generalisation. One underestimates a political, religious and cultural pluralism, not very unlike those present in Christianity and in the West. Many Islamic countries have tried to change to situation in Afghanistan, but it is evident that Kabul’s regime has also been conditioned by strategies and external financial support from some disputed Muslims who do not, in any way, represent the Muslim World.

The condemnation of terrorism and of the Taliban’s system of government appears to me clear and fairly unanimous. It is another thing to express condemnation to the strict religious practices of the Taliban: no Muslim has the right to judge the way in which another practises faith.

MN: According to many scholars, it is the very absence of a spiritual authority which “excommunicates” radicalism which is the principal obstacle for the evolution of Islam. Do you agree?

AK: The problem is wrongly posed and it does not concern the fundamentals of Islam. In fact, in the Shiite credence, one exalts the value of the intellect, of the spiritual guide, therefore of interpretation. But Western thought tends to confuse the bond between spirituality and secularism with a sort of compromise between State and Church. These are different levels, which involve the individual and the community in which one lives, not the political authority of the State. The Qur’an prohibits judging the way in which another Muslim practises faith, but it also prohibits the enforcement of a religious practice or of a faith.

In the world of Islam, which is nearly a fifth of the Earth’s population, there are significant examples of religious practices which conform to a moral concept of the faith. The Qur’an edicts the ethics of responsibility as an obligation for those who have civilian authority, to enhance the well being and the development of their community. This is something which the Taliban have not done and it is because of this that their regime condemns itself. In these conditions, Islam even says that trust in authority must be denied.

MN: The Western world asks itself about a possible conflict between civilisations, between concepts of society and of morals which are considered irreconcilable. What would you like to explain or to reprimand the West?

Diversity, if it stimulates discussions and encounters is a positive value. For the West, to understand the Muslim world and Islam, is to understand first of all the pluralism of peoples and their interpretations … What could be the Western world’s reaction if a Muslim affirmed that the Inquisition and the IRA represent the Catholic world?

AK: I am a Muslim who lives in the West and I continuously ask myself as to the how and why of this situation. The political and economical relationships between the West and the Islamic world show that a good understanding exists with different countries and that there are also strong ties. There is no conflict between civilisations, but only a large measure of ignorance, a lack of wishing to deepen mutual knowledge. It is a conflict of stereotypes and of prejudices, not of civilisation. Today, in the papers too, many explain and comment but how many, for example, know the difference between Shiite and Sunni, between jihadism and radicalists, between the Muslim Arab world and the Asian and African Muslim people?

There is an enormous confusion in schools and in universities. Hence in the general culture of the West there is no education regarding the Muslim world and the fundamental principal of the Qur’an are unknown: i.e. ethics, the learning of acknowledging faith in every moment of life with coherent behaviour.

It is also because of this that Islam did not secularise itself as did Christianity. We do not distinguish between earthly motives and spirituality, we do not deliberate the question of choice, in accordance with St. Augstine’s concept. But the diversity of concepts exists also in Christianity. Diversity, if it stimulates discussions and encounters is a positive value. For the West, to understand the Muslim world and Islam, is to understand first of all the pluralism of peoples and their interpretations and to avoid considering the Taliban as representatives of the entire Muslim world. What could be the Western world’s reaction if a Muslim affirmed that the Inquisition and the IRA represent the Catholic world?

MN: There are however, aspects of the Islamic society about which the West cannot but wonder. As an example: the increasing number of Mosques in the West and the difficulty of building Churches in the Islamic world, the conditions of women, the development of democratic institutions, the liberty of the mass media.

Certainly, differences with the West exist, but one must consider the essence and the ethical significance of rules and principals. We will have to question ourselves on values and ethics and on the decadence of a society without rules.

AK: It is not possible to generalise on these aspects also, because this causes one to consider a system better than another, albeit not understanding the moral criteria.

Our community and the institutions we have created — and we are certainly not unique — are examples of openness, without distinction of race, sex and religion. We have established the first supranational university: the University of Central Asia, with Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan which will be utilised by a population of 30 million, scattered in the entire region. This is an opportunity to develop an executive staff trained in managing a mountainous territory which includes Western China, Afghanistan, Iran and Turkey.

Islam knows of diverse evolutions in many corners of the world, even if, in certain environments, the challenge of modernisation and globalisation is lived as fear of Westernisation and loss of identity. In the past, Christianity developed in diverse areas of the Middle East, from Lebanon to Iraq and in Africa, especially during colonialism. Certainly, differences with the West exist, but one must consider the essence and the ethical significance of rules and principals. We will have to question ourselves on values and ethics and on the decadence of a society without rules.

The veil for women is a tradition which precedes Islam, and was introduced as a sign of respect of women and not of submission, i.e. against the concept that woman is an object of the society of men.

MN: On which points could common interests be found?

AK: The necessity to recognise the ethical standards of society is a common exigency. If ethical values collapse, the society itself will collapse and this has been demonstrated throughout the history of humanity.

Religion must be a means by which to affirm the ethical significance of existence, irrelevant of one’s faith.

I think that monotheistic religions, having an analogous belief in an only God, should and must dialogue. The three religions which Abraham inspired have many more common facets than those which divide them. Religion must be a means by which to affirm the ethical significance of existence, irrelevant of one’s faith. If we want social development, to meet halfway, to dialogue, peace, we cannot neglect ethics and the impact which education and culture have on social growth. My message is one of hope and however difficult to realise, it is not Utopian.

MN: In the meantime arms are being used, and the problem of Bin Laden must be solved. Do you approve of the bombings on Afghanistan?

AK: It is well known to all that several networks of international terrorism exist and that they are expanding and that their objective is destabilisation.

Cancer is a phenomenon of human life, if you do not cure it in time, it becomes invasive and terminal. Analogously, situations such as that of Afghanistan are part of the history of humanity. Certainly, other solutions existed, but one should have courageously intervened before. No one can say that one did not know. Today I hope that, once the “cancer” has been eliminated, the international community will truly concern itself about the future of Afghanistan, of the refugees, of the reconstruction of the country, of the preparation of an executive staff and of democratic institutions. All ethnic groups must be able to return to their homelands, to live in security, to have the right to profess their own religion, to be able to enjoy a valid educational system and the opportunity of economic growth.

It is essential to totally eliminate the production and traffic of drugs, which are the main sources for financing guerrilla warfare and terrorism.

MN: Do you believe, that in this scenario, the role of the Northern Alliance may be a decisive factor? And do you think that the King of Afghanistan, presently in exile in Italy, could have a role in revitalising Afghanistan?

The Northern Alliance has already played a decisive role, because it repressed the Taliban’s total possession of the country and it also impeded the occupation of the neighbouring countries … On the other hand, the Northern Alliance does not represent, and does not desire to represent, the entire population of the country.

AK: The Northern Alliance has already played a decisive role, because it repressed the Taliban’s total possession of the country and it also impeded the occupation of the neighbouring countries thereby avoiding the “cancer’s” ramification Unfortunately, it lost a man like Massaoud, one of the few who realised the necessity of abandoning a military status in order to construct a social development project. On the other hand, the Northern Alliance does not represent, and does not desire to represent, the entire population of the country. A transitional government will therefore have to posses ethnic and religious foundations which can represent the pluralism of Afghanistan. In these years of activities in the region, we have known and have established ties with other leaders and other communities who are interested in peace and in development.

For Afghanistan, I am convinced that King Zahir Shah is an important figurehead, because, obviously excluding certain extremist groups, he has the trust of the majority of the Afghanistan. In any case, it is obvious that any new government will need the UN’s total support. It will also be essential that it can count on a social and economical reconstruction, equal for all Afghani ethnics and which should be fully effective as soon as possible.. The quality and the speed with which assistance is offered, will be fundamental for the new government to obtain the population’s support and credibility.

Original in Italian

Introduction

La guida degli ismailiti: non c’ è un conflitto di civiltà bensì di reciproci pregiudizi e stereotipi

I TALEBANI

«Sul Corano si condannano da soli» Il Corano vieta l’ imposizione di una pratica religiosa o di una fede: per questo il regime dei talebani si condanna da solo, ma è sbagliato associarlo a Bin Laden e associare Bin Laden all’ Islam»

IL VELO

«Una tradizione nel rispetto della donna» Certo le differenze con l’ Occidente esistono ma bisogna guardare all’ essenza e al significato etico di regole e principi. Il velo per le donne è una tradizione antecedente all’ Islam, introdotta in segno di rispetto»

Interview

ATTACCO AL TERRORISMO L’ INTERVISTA E’ il quarantanovesimo discendente di Maometto, una delle principali autorità spirituali dei musulmani sciiti «Forme di estremismo religioso possono nascere dal senso di frustrazione del mondo arabo per i problemi irrisolti» L’ Aga Khan: «Mi stupisce l’ ignoranza sull’ Islam» La guida degli ismailiti: non c’ è un conflitto di civiltà bensì di reciproci pregiudizi e stereotipi

E’ una delle autorità spirituali dell’ Islam che meglio conosce terre e popoli dell’ Asia centrale, l’ area che tiene il mondo con il fiato sospeso. E’ l’ Imam, capo religioso e guida degli sciiti ismailiti, le cui comunità sono sparse in diversi Paesi dell’ Asia e dell’ Africa ma anche in Europa e in Nord America. Nell’ area tra l’ Iran, il Pakistan, il Tajikistan, l’ Afghanistan e la Cina occidentale vivono oltre cinque milioni di ismailiti.

Sua Altezza l’ Aga Khan, è il quarantanovesimo Imam, discendente diretto di Maometto attraverso Ali, suo cugino che sposò Fatima, figlia del Profeta.

L’ Aga Khan è impegnato in ambiziosi progetti sociali, economici ed educativi mirati al sostegno e allo sviluppo umano nei Paesi del terzo mondo, dal Mozambico alla Tanzania, dal Pakistan alle ex repubbliche sovietiche del Tagikistan, Kyrgjstan, Kazakistan, dal Bangladesh all’ India.

Uno di programmi di sviluppo socio economico attuati nelle aree rurali del nord Pakistan nella Regione dell’ Hunza, ha ottenuto il riconoscimento della Banca Mondiale e il modello è stato «esportato» con successo in molti altri Paesi.

Il Corriere lo ha incontrato ad Aiglemont, sua residenza e segreteria delle molteplici attività istituzionali. Una splendida tenuta immersa nelle foreste che circondano il castello incantato di Chantilly, a nord di Parigi. Sembrano lontani i quartieri maghrebini della periferia, eppure così vicini, in Francia come in tutto l’ Occidente, al cuore del problema, il confronto fra religioni e culture, non mediato dal benessere e dalla conoscenza, per questo terreno favorevole alle bandiere dell’ intolleranza e dell’ esclusione.

Da questa specie di centro direzionale, l’ Aga Khan dirige la sua «Development Network», rete d’ iniziative e istituzioni dedicate al miglioramento delle condizioni di vita dei Paesi in via di sviluppo. Opera a tutto campo con interventi dall’ emergenza umanitaria allo sviluppo economico, dall’ educazione alla sanità, nella convinzione che

«ovunque nel mondo, l’ instabilità etnica e religiosa è largamente promossa dalla povertà. Se c’ è povertà non c’ è speranza nella vita. Le tensioni, i conflitti etnici e religiosi, la violenza trovano terreno fertile in contesti di povertà e d’ ignoranza»

Stessa origine anche per il regime dei talebani?

His Highness the Aga Khan: «Conosco bene la situazione. I talebani sono un fenomeno singolare che trae origine dall’ asse tra il mondo arabo e il Pakistan. Loro hanno imposto una interpretazione dell’ Islam mai prima imposta alla popolazione afghana e che non è mai esistita nel contesto teologico del Paese fino a qualche decina d’ anni fa. Sono una realtà singolare che non può essere considerata rappresentativa della generalità della comunità islamica del territorio. Siamo impegnati da anni in quest’ area, dove è concentrata parte della nostra comunità. In Afghanistan vivevano tra 750.000 e un milione di Ismailiti prima della guerra e anche la nostra gente è stata costretta a fuggire. In Afghanistan, centinaia di migliaia hanno subito persecuzioni, siamo stati spettatori diretti di un disastro umano e civile».

Come spiega il legame fra il regime religioso e il terrorismo di Bin Laden?

AK: «Il conflitto con l’ Unione Sovietica dopo l’ invasione dell’ armata rossa, l’ aiuto e l’ addestramento militare fornito anche dall’ Occidente ai mujahiddin, combattenti volontari arrivati anche da altri Paesi e, dopo il ritiro dei sovietici, in pratica la guerra civile fra fazioni etniche.

L’ Afghanistan è stato abbandonato al proprio destino. Nessun aiuto economico, nessun supporto alla ricostruzione delle istituzioni politiche, nessuna iniziativa internazionale. Un destino che hanno rischiato anche le ex repubbliche sovietiche che circondano le frontiere del nord la cui fragilità organizzativa e politica avrebbe potuto favorire l’ ingerenza dei talebani.

Quando abbiamo cominciato a lavorare in quest’ area, ci siamo immersi in uno scenario di povertà immensa, di conflitti culturali e tensioni latenti fra gruppi etnici e religiosi costretti a vivere a stretto contatto nel campo dei rapporti sociali. Ad esempio, nelle repubbliche dell’ Asia Centrale, i russi avevano assicurato la parità sociale alle donne, però, a pochi chilometri di distanza, le donne hanno continuato a vivere secondo la tradizione del luogo.

L’ Afghanistan, abbandonato da tutti e conquistato dai talebani, è diventato un immenso campo d’ addestramento del terrorismo internazionale, utilizzato in varie situazioni, a più riprese e per scopi diversi ed è ancora oggi il grande crocevia della droga».

Ma il regime dei talebani si fonda su un’ interpretazione rigorosa del Corano, in un certo senso il regime è una teocrazia assolutista. E Bin Laden, che i talebani proteggono, si presenta come un eroe della guerra santa. Il terrorismo sembra anche figlio dell’ estremismo religioso.

AK: «I conflitti nel pianeta non sono un problema che riguarda soltanto l’ Islam. Basta rileggere la storia e osservare il mondo di oggi. Irlanda, Sri Lanka, Kashmir, Cecenia, Balcani, Africa. La religione può diventare uno strumento di conflitto, ma raramente nel mondo odierno ne è la causa primaria.

E’ vero che forme di estremismo religioso nascono anche dalla frustrazione del mondo arabo per i problemi irrisolti, quello palestinese innanzi tutto. Quando la sofferenza e i conflitti interni sono durevoli, inevitabilmente si internazionalizzano. Ma il regime dei talebani in Afghanistan è frutto di un fallimento: del mondo civile, della Comunità internazionale.

Nessun individuo, nessun Paese o organizzazione internazionale, a prescindere se islamica o no, che hanno cercato di confrontarsi con loro – e ce ne sono state diverse – hanno avuto successo nel convincerli che i loro modi erano contrari ai principi ed obiettivi accettabili di una società umana moderna».

MN: Come spiega la prudenza del mondo islamico nell’ esprimere un’ esplicita e totale condanna dei talebani?

AK: «Quando si parla di Islam si fanno spesso generalizzazioni prive di fondamento. Si sottovaluta un pluralismo politico, religioso e culturale non lontano dal pluralismo presente nella cristianità e nell’ Occidente. Molti Paesi islamici hanno anche tentato di cambiare la situazione in Afghanistan, ma è evidente che il regime di Kabul è stato anche condizionato da strategie e finanziamenti esterni anche da parte di alcuni contesti musulmani per quanto gli stessi non rappresentino nel modo più assoluto la totalità del mondo musulmano.

La condanna del terrorismo e del sistema di governo dei talebani mi sembra chiara e abbastanza unanime. Altra cosa è esprimere una condanna della pratica strettamente religiosa dei talebani: nessun musulmano ha il diritto di giudicare il modo di praticare la fede di un altro».

MN: Secondo diversi studiosi, è proprio l’ assenza di un’ autorità spirituale che «scomunichi» l’ estremismo il principale ostacolo all’ evoluzione dell’ Islam. E’ d’ accordo?

AK: «Il problema è mal posto e non riguarda i fondamenti dell’ Islam. Nella confessione sciita peraltro si esalta il valore dell’ intelletto, della guida spirituale, quindi dell’ interpretazione. Ma il pensiero occidentale tende a confondere il legame fra spirituale e temporale con una sorta di rapporto fra Stato e Chiesa. Sono piani diversi, che coinvolgono la sfera individuale e la comunità in cui si vive, non l’ autorità politica dello Stato. Il Corano vieta di giudicare il modo di praticare la fede di un altro musulmano, ma vieta anche l’ imposizione di una pratica religiosa o di una fede.

Nel mondo islamico, circa un quinto della popolazione della terra, ci sono esempi più significativi di pratiche religiose che rispondono ad una concezione morale della fede. Il Corano prescrive l’ etica della responsabilità, un obbligo per coloro che hanno autorità nella vita civile a favorire benessere e sviluppo della propria comunità. Cosa che i talebani non hanno fatto e per questo il loro regime si condanna da solo. In tali condizioni l’ Islam dice anche che la fiducia nell’ autorità deve essere ritirata».

MN: Il mondo occidentale s’ interroga su un possibile conflitto di civiltà, fra concezioni della società e della morale ritenute inconciliabili. Che cosa si sentirebbe di spiegare o di rimproverare all’ Occidente?

AK: «Io sono un musulmano che vive in Occidente e mi interrogo costantemente sul come e perché di questa situazione. Le relazioni politiche ed economiche fra Occidente e mondo islamico dimostrano che esistono buoni rapporti con diversi Paesi e anche forti legami. Non c’ è un conflitto di civiltà, bensì una grande dose d’ ignoranza, di scarsa volontà di approfondire la reciproca conoscenza. E’ un conflitto di stereotipi e di pregiudizi, non di civiltà. Oggi, anche nei giornali, molti spiegano e commentano. Ma quanti, ad esempio, conoscono la differenza fra sciiti e sunniti, fra jihadismo (fondamentalismo, n.d.r.) e radicalismo, fra mondo arabo musulmano e popoli asiatici e africani musulmani?

C’ è grande confusione, nelle scuole e nelle università, dunque nelle fonti della cultura generale in Occidente, non si educa sul mondo musulmano e si perde di vista un principio fondamentale del Corano: l’ etica, l’ educazione alla testimonianza della fede in ogni attimo della vita, con comportamenti coerenti.

Anche per questo l’ Islam non si è secolarizzato come la cristianità. Noi non distinguiamo fra attività terrene e spiritualità, non avvertiamo la questione della scelta, secondo la concezione di Sant’ Agostino. Ma le diversità di concezioni ci sono anche nella cristianità. La diversità, se stimola il confronto e l’ incontro, è un valore positivo. Capire il mondo musulmano e la fede dell’ Islam, per l’ Occidente, è capire prima di tutto il pluralismo dei popoli e le loro interpretazioni ed evitare di considerare i talebani quali rappresentanti l’ intero mondo musulmano. Quale potrebbe essere la reazione in Occidente se un musulmano affermasse che l’ inquisizione e l’ Ira sono rappresentativi del mondo cattolico?».

MN: Ci sono però aspetti della società islamica su cui l’ Occidente non può fare a meno d’ interrogarsi. Qualche esempio: la crescente presenza di moschee in Occidente e le difficoltà di costruire chiese nel mondo islamico, la condizione della donna, lo sviluppo delle istituzioni democratiche, la libertà dei mass media.

AK: «Anche su questi aspetti non è possibile generalizzare, perché questo porta a considerare un sistema migliore di un altro, non si capisce però sulla base di quali criteri morali.

La nostra comunità e le istituzioni che abbiamo creato – e non siamo certamente gli unici – sono un esempio di apertura, senza distinzione di razze, sesso e religione. Abbiamo costituito la prima università sopranazionale, l’ Università dell’ Asia Centrale, con il Tagikistan, il Kyrgjstan e il Kazakistan, che sarà al servizio di una popolazione di trenta milioni, sparsa in tutta la regione. Un’ opportunità per far crescere una classe dirigente preparata alla gestione di un territorio di alta montagna che include anche la Cina occidentale, l’ Afghanistan, l’ Iran e la Turchia.

L’ Islam conosce evoluzioni diverse in molti angoli del mondo, anche se la sfida della modernizzazione e della globalizzazione viene in alcuni ambienti vissuta come paura dell’ occidentalizzazione e di perdita d’ identità. La cristianità si è sviluppata in passato in diverse aree del Medio Oriente, dal Libano all’ Iraq e in Africa, specialmente durante il periodo del colonialismo. Certo, le differenze con l’ Occidente esistono, ma bisogna guardare all’ essenza e al significato etico di regole e principi. Dovremmo interrogarci sul valore etico e sulla decadenza di una società senza regole.

Il velo, per le donne, è una tradizione antecedente all’ Islam, introdotta in segno di rispetto, non di sottomissione, contro una concezione della donna come oggetto della società maschile».

MN: Su quale terreno si possono trovare punti d’ incontro?

AK: «La necessità di riconoscere gli standard etici della società è un’ esigenza comune. Se i valori etici crollano, la stessa società crolla e ciò è dimostrato dalla storia dell’ umanità.

Io penso che le religioni monoteiste, avendo un comune riferimento di un unico Dio, possano e debbano dialogare. Le tre religioni che si ispirano ad Abramo hanno molto più in comune di quanto non le separi. La religione deve essere il mezzo per affermare il significato etico dell’ esistenza, indipendentemente dalla propria professione di fede. Se vogliamo sviluppo sociale, incontro, dialogo, pace, non possiamo prescindere dall’ etica e dalla funzione che hanno l’ educazione e la cultura nella crescita sociale. Il mio è un messaggio di speranza e, per quanto non di facile realizzazione, non è utopia».

MN: Intanto parlano le armi e bisogna risolvere il problema Bin Laden. Lei approva il bombardamento dell’ Afghanistan?

AK: «E’ noto a tutti che esistono diverse reti di terrorismo internazionale che tendono a crescere e che hanno quale obiettivo la destabilizzazione.

Il cancro è un fenomeno della vita umana, se non lo si cura per tempo diventa invasivo e terminale. Analogamente, situazioni come quella dell’ Afghanistan fanno parte della storia dell’ umanità. Certamente c’ erano altre soluzioni ma bisognava intervenire con coraggio prima. Nessuno può dire che non sapeva. Oggi spero che, una volta eliminato il “cancro”, la Comunità internazionale si preoccupi davvero del futuro dell’ Afghanistan, dei profughi, della ricostruzione del Paese, della preparazione di una classe dirigente e di istituzioni democratiche. Tutte le etnie devono poter tornare alle proprie terre d’ origine, crescere nella sicurezza, avere il diritto di professare la propria religione, poter fruire di un valido sistema educativo e di opportunità di sviluppo economico.

E’ fondamentale la completa eliminazione della coltivazione e del traffico di droga, principale fonte di finanziamento della guerriglia e del terrorismo».

MN: Ritiene che in questo scenario possa essere decisivo il ruolo dell’ Alleanza del Nord? E pensa che il Re dell’ Afghanistan, oggi in esilio in Italia, possa avere un ruolo nel rilancio del Paese?

AK: «L’ Alleanza del Nord è stata già decisiva perché ha impedito ai talebani di impadronirsi completamente del Paese e impedendo altresì l’ occupazione dei territori dei Paesi limitrofi evitando così la ramificazione del “tumore”. Purtroppo ha perso un uomo come Massoud, uno dei pochi a rendersi conto della necessità di passare da una fase militare alla costruzione di un progetto di sviluppo sociale. D’ altronde, l’ Alleanza del Nord non rappresenta e non pretende di rappresentare l’ intera popolazione del Paese. Un governo di transizione, dunque, dovrà avere delle basi etniche e religiose che possano rappresentare la pluralità afghana. In questi anni di attività nella regione, abbiamo conosciuto e costruito rapporti anche con altri leader e altre comunità interessate alla pace e allo sviluppo.

Per l’ Afghanistan, sono convinto che il Re Zahir Shah sia una figura importante, perché ha la fiducia della grande maggioranza della popolazione afghana esclusi ovviamente alcuni gruppi di estremisti. E’ evidente che qualsiasi nuovo governo avrà bisogno comunque del sostegno rigoroso dell’ Onu così come sarà altrettanto essenziale che possa contare su un programma di ricostruzione sociale ed economica equo per tutte le etnie afghane e realizzabile in tempi più brevi possibile. La qualità e la velocità degli interventi saranno fondamentali per dare al nuovo governo forza e credibilità nei confronti della popolazione»

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)