[Google translation] Indeed, military intervention [in Afghanistan] may not be limited. In a country like Afghanistan where the Taliban decided to resist mountain by mountain, valley by valley, the war may last longer. But I repeat that the reconstruction work must begin now. It passes through the country’s liberation, but also by establishing a sort of safety belt around Afghanistan. The challenge is to stabilise the whole region. From Pakistan to Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan, all its neighbours are in danger of destabilisation, religious radicalism and have an equal interest in the restoration of a legal situation. Tajikistan has only to end the civil war. The regional impact of pacification and stabilisation of Afghanistan can be considerable.

TRANSLATION REQUIRED: We regret only a Google machine translation of this item is available in the Archive. Google translations only provide a gist of the remarks and, therefore, do NOT recommend quoting this text until a human translation is available. We would be very grateful if any of our readers, fluent in the original language, would be kind enough to translate the text. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

Interviewer: Henri Tincq

Google translation — Click here for the original in French

An Imam of Shia Ismaili calls to prevent starvation in Afghanistan. According to Karim Aga Khan, Imam of the Shia Ismaili, “we must first stop people dying of hunger in Afghanistan and rebuild a civil society”.

Henry Tincq: What is your plan for the future of Afghanistan?

His Highness the Aga Khan: Every day, every hour counts for a military liberation of the country and civilian responses to public support. The first phase is to prevent people dying of hunger. We are now only three or four weeks of winter, that is to say in a situation of extreme urgency. The NGOs must be prepared to intervene, namely the status of their stocks and how to distribute it, to press for “corridors” humanitarian shelter for the winter is not crossed by more horrors than those that exist today.

The second phase — in spring, and according to the military evolution — should be the start of civil reconstruction and the repatriation of three to four million refugees in conditions of security and fairness of progressive return to a state law. Without waiting, we can already address the preparation of a consensus on some principles of a modern state, to rebuild a medical system, a school system, banking system, invite intellectuals to return and join in this effort to overhaul a civil society. This involves an absolute condition: avoid proselytising in this work involve Muslims and non-Muslims, ethical reasoning, rather than theocratic about Pathans and Pashtuns, and not Taliban.

HT: Do you think such a programme is so realistic that the U.S. intervention is still in its infancy?

AK: Indeed, military intervention may not be limited. In a country like Afghanistan where the Taliban decided to resist mountain by mountain, valley by valley, the war may last longer. But I repeat that the reconstruction work must begin now. It passes through the country’s liberation, but also by establishing a sort of safety belt around Afghanistan. The challenge is to stabilise the whole region. From Pakistan to Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan to Uzbekistan, all its neighbours are in danger of destabilisation, religious radicalism and have an equal interest in the restoration of a legal situation. Tajikistan has only to end the civil war. The regional impact of pacification and stabilisation of Afghanistan can be considerable.

HT: How the reconstruction of a civil society is it possible, given the fragmentation of ethnic and religious?

[Google translation] The prerequisite [to reconstructing of a civil society] is a spirit resolutely pluralistic and rejection of proselytism. All ethnic groups must be respected in terms of total equity.

AK: The prerequisite is a spirit resolutely pluralistic and rejection of proselytism. All ethnic groups must be respected in terms of total equity. The diversity of interpretations of Islam should certainly be protected by law, but a theocratic state does not seem to match the history and multiple cultures of Afghanistan. It is a question that Afghans will respond in time. Afghanistan, as part of the whole Muslim world, is subject to religious influences, and financial policies that emanate from some Arab countries. This influence has resulted in construction of mosques, a de-legitimisation of non-Arab Muslim elites in Central Asia but also in Indonesia, Malaysia, in black Africa.

By depriving their governments of aid deemed undemocratic or incompetent, the international financial institutions have left the field open to those financial pressures, political and religious. I believe today that Western governments have learned the lessons of what can only be interpreted by proselytism from some Arab countries and they will reflect in their reconstruction efforts in Central Asia. This should go through the institutions, structures, teams pluralist Muslim and non Muslim. Its coordination and implementation should belong to the United Nations.

HT: You who are in the hinge of the Shiite world and the Western world, do you think it is a “clash of civilisations”?

[Google translation] It is therefore necessary to approach Islam as a faith, but more widely as a factor of civilisation. The West must understand the history, economics, demography, ethics, ethnic groups and cultures that make up the Muslim world. Islam can not be interpreted only by its forms and practices. Should we reduce the knowledge of the West in one teaching of Catholicism? I repeat that we can not judge the Muslim ethic based on one particular practice.

AK: This concept is a broad farce. As if there was only one Islamic civilisation and Western Christian civilisation. You can not judge the Muslim world, much less Islam in general, depending only on the practice of a country or a group, extremist or not. The character of Muslim societies can not be judged solely on practices which are current. When you apply to everyday life that make the interpretation of Islam the Taliban, you measure how it is in contradiction with the Muslim ethic. Same in Pakistan where, unlike the image data in the West, there is a small percentage of the population linked to the politicisation of Islam.

In this debate, the centrepiece is the vast ignorance in the Western world, of what Islam is. Before the Iranian revolution, he knew that the Muslim world is divided between Sunni and Shia? And he knows today the Shiites, he knows what separates the Sunnis? There, in the West, a total lack of basic education on what unites, but differs more than one billion people practising different forms, a common religion, Islam. It is therefore necessary to approach Islam as a faith, but more widely as a factor of civilisation. The West must understand the history, economics, demography, ethics, ethnic groups and cultures that make up the Muslim world. Islam can not be interpreted only by its forms and practices. Should we reduce the knowledge of the West in one teaching of Catholicism? I repeat that we can not judge the Muslim ethic based on one particular practice.

Original transcript in French

Un imam des chiites ismaéliens appelle à empêcher la famine en Afghanistan. Selon Karim Agha Khan, imam des chiites ismaéliens, “il faut d’abord empêcher que des gens meurent de faim en Afghanistan, puis reconstruire une société civile”.

Henry Tincq: Quel est votre plan pour l’avenir de l’afghanistan?

His Highness the Aga Khan: Chaque jour, chaque heure compte pour une libération militaire du pays et pour des interventions civiles de soutien des populations. La première phase est d’empêcher que des gens meurent de faim. Nous ne sommes plus qu’à trois ou quatre semaines de l’hiver, c’est-à-dire dans une situation d’urgence absolue. Les organisations non gouvernementales doivent être prêtes à intervenir, savoir où en sont leurs stocks et comment les distribuer, faire pression pour obtenir des “couloirs” humanitaires, construire des abris pour que l’hiver ne soit pas traversé par plus d’horreurs que celles qui existent aujourd’hui.

La deuxième phase – au printemps, et selon l’évolution militaire – devrait être celle du début de la reconstruction civile, du rapatriement des trois à quatre millions de réfugiés dans des conditions de garantie et d’équité, du retour progressif à un Etat de droit. Sans attendre, on peut déjà s’attaquer à la préparation d’un consensus autour de certains principes d’un Etat moderne, à la reconstruction d’un réseau médical, d’un système scolaire, d’un système bancaire, inviter les intellectuels à revenir et à s’associer à cet effort de refondation d’une société civile. Celle-ci passe par une condition absolue : éviter tout prosélytisme, associer à ce travail des musulmans et des non-musulmans, raisonner en termes éthiques et non plus théocratiques, parler de Pathans et de Pachtounes, et non plus de talibans.

HT: Croyez-vous qu’un tel programme soit réaliste alors que l’intervention américaine n’en est qu’à ses débuts?

AK: En effet, l’intervention militaire ne pourra pas être limitée. Dans un territoire comme l’Afghanistan, si les talibans décident de résister montagne par montagne, vallée par vallée, la guerre peut durer longtemps. Mais je répète que le travail de reconstruction doit commencer dès maintenant. Il passe par la libération du pays, mais aussi par l’établissement d’une sorte de ceinture de sécurité autour de l’Afghanistan. L’enjeu est la stabilisation de toute la région. Du Pakistan au Tadjikistan, du Kirghizistan à l’Ouzbékistan, tous ses voisins sont en danger de déstabilisation, de radicalisation religieuse et ont un intérêt égal au rétablissement d’une situation de droit. Le Tadjikistan vient seulement de mettre fin à la guerre civile. L’impact régional d’une pacification et d’une stabilisation de l’Afghanistan peut être considérable.

HT: Comment cette reconstruction d’une société civile est-elle possible, compte tenu de l’émiettement ethnique et religieux?

AK: Le préalable est un esprit résolument pluraliste et le rejet de tout prosélytisme. Toutes les ethnies doivent être respectées dans des conditions de totale équité. La diversité des interprétations de l’islam doit certes être protégée par la loi, mais un Etat théocratique ne me semble pas correspondre à l’histoire et aux cultures multiples de l’Afghanistan. C’est une question à laquelle les Afghans répondront dans le temps. L’Afghanistan, comme toute cette partie du monde musulman, est soumise à des influences religieuses, politiques et financières qui émanent de certains pays du monde arabe. Cette influence s’est traduite par des constructions de mosquées, par une délégitimation des élites musulmanes non arabes, en Asie centrale, mais aussi en Indonésie, en Malaisie, en Afrique noire.

En privant de leurs aides des gouvernements jugés non démocratiques ou incompétents, les institutions financières internationales ont laissé le champ libre à ces pressions financières, politiques et religieuses. Je crois aujourd’hui que les gouvernements occidentaux ont tiré les leçons de ce qu’il faut bien interpréter par du prosélytisme émanant de certains pays arabes et qu’ils en tiendront compte dans leurs efforts de reconstruction en Asie centrale. Celle-ci devra passer par des institutions, des structures, des équipes pluralistes du monde musulman et non musulman. Sa coordination et sa mise en oeuvre devraient appartenir aux Nations unies.

HT: Vous qui êtes à la charnière du monde chiite et du monde occidental, croyez-vous qu’il s’agisse d’un “choc de civilisations”?

AK: Cette notion est une vaste farce. Comme s’il n’y avait qu’une civilisation musulmane et une civilisation chrétienne occidentale. On ne peut pas juger du monde musulman, encore moins de l’islam en général, en fonction seulement de la pratique d’un pays ou d’un groupe, extrémiste ou pas. La moralité des sociétés musulmanes ne se juge pas uniquement en fonction des pratiques qui y ont cours. Quand vous appliquez à la vie quotidienne l’interprétation que font les talibans de l’islam, vous mesurez combien elle est en contradiction avec cette éthique musulmane. Même chose au Pakistan où, contrairement aux images données en Occident, il n’y a qu’un petit pourcentage de la population lié à cette politisation de l’islam.

Dans ce débat, l’élément central est la grande ignorance, dans le monde occidental, de ce qu’est l’islam. Avant la révolution iranienne, savait-il que le monde musulman est partagé entre sunnites et chiites ? Et s’il connaît aujourd’hui les chiites, sait-il ce qui les sépare des sunnites ? Il y a, en Occident, une absence totale d’éducation de base sur ce qui réunit, mais aussi différencie plus d’un milliard de personnes pratiquant, sous des formes différentes, une religion commune, l’islam. Il lui faut donc approcher l’islam comme foi, mais plus largement comme facteur de civilisation. L’Occident doit comprendre l’histoire, l’économie, la démographie, l’éthique, les ethnies et les cultures qui composent le monde musulman. L’islam ne peut plus être interprété seulement par ses formes et ses pratiques. Faudrait-il réduire la connaissance de l’Occident au seul enseignement du catholicisme ? Je répète qu’on ne peut plus juger de l’éthique musulmane en fonction d’une seule pratique particulière.

SOURCES

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)