[Google translation] [A] question I posed to a Christian philosopher: technology, according to you, it does not compete with God? With advances in science, people who were dying, they prolonged twenty years. Contraception prevents planned for unborn human beings come into the world. We transplant hearts, we add the kidneys, livers. Man competes with God?

No. There is no limit to the power of God. Even the successes of modern medicine are additional proofs of the unlimited power of Allah. It is He who wishes to give to mankind a chance to prolong their worldly life, in so far as it is not illusory. Landing on the moon shows less the power of man than the power of God. Allah has put in the universe much more than what humans have thought to see. It is for this reason existence is exciting and one should act fully, participating as much as possible in everything of life that represents dignity and eternal hope. (2)

TRANSLATION REQUIRED: We regret only a Google machine translation of this item is available in the Archive. Google translations only provide a gist of the remarks and, therefore, do NOT recommend quoting this text until a human translation is available. We would be very grateful if any of our readers, fluent in the original language, would be kind enough to translate the text. Please click here for information on making submissions to NanoWisdoms; we thank you for your assistance.

Interviewer: Paul Giannoli

Google translation — Click here for the original in French

Paul Giannoli met for the IT today, it no longer belongs to a thousand and one nights, but this is a young man fully inserted in its time. Karim Aga Khan is less a “living god”, a businessman and a religious leader responsible for millions of souls who has almost no time for life’s pleasures.

Paul Giannoli: Your interviews are rare. You’re one of those few individuals who do not need publicity whatsoever. Moreover, it reflects too much for you not to betray you. The reflection that gives you the Western press is too often distorted or incomplete. You’re like icebergs which the most important is that we do not see. What we see one of the most important religious leaders of the world is his picture in a dinner or weighing.

[Google translation] I intervene only if the newspapers attacking, even if indirectly, my position as Imam of the Ismaili faith or the Muslim faith in general.

His Highness the Aga Khan: It is true that I try to avoid interviews. The mainstream media presents events for the general public: it can happen to sacrifice for the deeper aspects picturesque sides. After eleven years of semi-public, I have made. I intervene only if the newspapers attacking, even if indirectly, my position as Imam of the Ismaili faith or the Muslim faith in general. I already had to intervene in some countries when he took.

PL: Your faithful scattered throughout the world must feel a certain surprise when they discover your life through the Western press.

AK: I think the Ismailis know that a newspaper has the freedom of thought and we can not always act. This is also true for other than me. Look at the Pope: he can not intervene if one wants to write against him. What is sensitive to Ismailis around the world is less to see my photo to a ball that the mundane work that I do in the world.

PL: Your position is unique. You’re a religious leader and a head of state without a country without capital.

AK: In fact, the Ismaili community center: the Imam. It is central to any business.

PL: The country, is it where you are?

AK: Do not meddle in religious matters not what is. The centre of religious life and daily activity is concentrated around the Imam. But the Ismailis are full citizens of the states in which they live. They have a religion: the Ismaili, a nationality, Pakistani, Indian, Kenyan or another. The courts apply the law of the country, except in the case where we have our act. While they generally agree that the courts have decreed Ismailis.

PL: Can we compare the Ismailis to Jews whose big question is whether the religious affiliation must come before nationality?

AK: The international politics affects us, but we are not committed as Jews in the defense of Israel. There is not a state Ismaili.

PL: Do you think the Ismaili can play an international role, intervening in world affairs?

AK: He was able to exert some influence in the past, so at the time of my grandfather and for me during these past eleven years. Not only the political, economic, but social. If a serious cause, the Ismailis decided to retire en masse in a particular country, it is possible that this is a way as any to tip the balance.

PL: How can we show the public the difference between the Ismailis and Muslims?

AK: There is no problem: the Ismailis are Muslims. But the religion of Muslims is divided into two main branches: Sonita and Shiites, as the religion of Christians is divided into Catholic and Protestants. The Ismailis are Shia. The Shiites ascribe to members of the family of prophet a special position in Islam and as my family descends from the family of Ali, we are a branch in the Shiite branch. There are many other branches: in the past, Yemen, Egypt were Shiites, now part of Iraq is Shiite, Iran is Shiite.

[Google translation] On the spiritual level, perhaps. As Pope, Imam gives guidelines on the practice of faith. terms dogmatic, no. The pope is elected. The Imam has a hereditary position.

PL: For the Ismailis, the Imam is it the equivalent of the Pope for Catholics?

AK: On the spiritual level, perhaps. As Pope, Imam gives guidelines on the practice of faith. terms dogmatic, no. The pope is elected. The Imam has a hereditary position.

[Google translation] In cases of serious misconduct, there is no “excommunication” in the Catholic sense of the word and, insofar as this comparison is not at fault the right to practice one’s religion is a right which is acquired by the fact that God has given him a soul and he always has the option to submit it. It is temporarily excluded from the non-religious community, it no longer enjoys certain advantages, but it retains the right to pray, to be buried according to our rituals.

PL: You observe the laws and dogmas and, where appropriate, with a power of sanction?

AK: I decide. But the power of punishment is appropriate for our religion. In cases of serious misconduct, there is no “excommunication” in the Catholic sense of the word and, insofar as this comparison is not at fault the right to practice one’s religion is a right which is acquired by the fact that God has given him a soul and he always has the option to submit it. It is temporarily excluded from the non-religious community, it no longer enjoys certain advantages, but it retains the right to pray, to be buried according to our rituals.

PL: So you’re a religious leader. But you are in the same time, the eyes of modern society, a young millionaire. One of the sayings of the atomic age, is “To be rich like the Aga Khan”.

AK: There are many people richer than me, in the personal sense of the word. Many properties are in the name of the Imam because it is the head of the community, but this is personal property. For example, schools and hospitals. What contributed to that legend, the pomp of jubilees. My grandfather was an imam for 72 years. The Ismailis who were very attached is held to thank him publicly at some turning points in his life. They chose to give his regular weight in stones and precious metals. But these are transformed into fabulous weighed institutions around the world, founded with money symbolically offered to the Imam.

PL: Imagine placing you on a scale, you, a modern young man. Do not you find the ceremony a bit weird?

AK: You know, one role of the Imam is to keep the faith day to guide the tradition without change systematically. The problem did not appear. The Jubilees were held every twenty years. I am Imam for eleven years. In nine years, I can not predict the wishes of the Ismailis nor my decision.

PL: It must be difficult to fill your position. You are a Muslim Leader but, by your studies and your life, you are also a “product” of Western world. (2)

I live physically in the West, but psychologically, personally, I am much closer to Islam. (2)

AK: This is not completely right. Certainly I attended renowned Swiss schools and studied for three and a half years in the United States, but I have also been a student of Orientalism. I have had, in my youth, courses in the Ismaili community before studying overseas and I have a degree in Islamic history. I live physically in the West, but psychologically, personally, I am much closer to Islam. (2)

PL: Then why did you live mostly in the West?

AK: In part, to be in contact with modern ideas and hope to apply them to developing countries: to travel through the West allows me to keep abreast of progress and also to escape local political position.

PL: It is probably difficult to juggle the Muslim religion and industrialization Ismaili. How to operate the plants, for example, the rate of atomic production, while Muslims must pray five times a day and observe Ramadan?

AK: There are practical problems, for sure. These are not the easiest to solve. The development of the Ismaili economy is linked to Western ideas that are not ours. But the Imam has the right to decide on many practical issues. When a Muslim community has no Imam, the State may declare that the factories do not stop five times a day that Ramadan should not slow down performance. To what extent can we adapt our designs to those of the West, is a delicate work everyday. So far I think we managed to keep a training of mind entirely Muslim, with a practice of religion and positive force in maintaining a material expansion is far from negligible.

[Google translation] It was a bold step, but more social than religious. Originally, the veil has nothing to do with Islam and the veil was worn in pre-Islamic Arabia. The veil was, initially, what distinguished a free woman of a slave. The slave woman was not wearing a veil, it could be bought or exchanged. The woman wearing the veil was not available to the company. The veil has become, not a symbol but a folklore.

PL: This is your grandfather who has allowed the veil is no longer mandatory. Was it a revolutionary step when it did?

AK: It was a bold step, but more social than religious. Originally, the veil has nothing to do with Islam and the veil was worn in pre-Islamic Arabia. The veil was, initially, what distinguished a free woman of a slave. The slave woman was not wearing a veil, it could be bought or exchanged. The woman wearing the veil was not available to the company. The veil has become, not a symbol but a folklore.

PL: When your grandfather took this action, he was sure not to go against the wishes of the majority?

AK: No. It was the practical application of a question that seemed more social than religious and that decision has been warmly welcomed.

PL: Can you make decisions of this importance?

AK: Without a doubt. The challenge is to anticipate the time or the extent to which one can correct a constraint. When one does not disappoint those who consider themselves advanced. it discourages those who remain in the tradition.

PL: We spoke earlier of veiled and unveiled women. Have you a Muslim or Western concept of marriage?

AK: I do not talk of marriage. So much has been written false things about it. I believe that no man holding public office is obliged to talk about his private life.

PL: I wanted to say that I think it would be difficult for a woman to share your life, because of your responsibilities.

AK: I do not know. I am not married. You will conclude that you want.

PL: How do you ensure that these activities do not contradict you? They are a chain of permanent work, despite the official social events.

[Google translation] I perform my role as Imam constantly, until my death. A minister can go away, someone responsible for his acting in the month he went on leave. This is not my case. he function of Imam attached to my person.

AK: For me, the concept of vacation is not. I perform my role as Imam constantly, until my death. A minister can go away, someone responsible for his acting in the month he went on leave. This is not my case. The function of Imam attached to my person. I must give myself entirely to the business it symbolizes, trying to learn everything a human mind can remember. What is fascinating and extraordinary experiences that store and distribute them elsewhere, whether in Kenya as banking or tourism as in Sardinia. No activity shall be limited, except for race horses. I have a team. It’s a hobby. This is not a vocation.

PL: What do you like horses, does the victory or improvement of a race?

[Google translation] If human logic can play a role in horse racing, this is not much more than 55%. This is an area where you do not dominate. There are men who love this glorious uncertainty and have the choice between an unexpected disappointment and unexpected joy.

AK: First, we love horses, or you do not like them. Then the turf is the land of the unknown where the joy of surprise is always possible. You have a business where success can be 75% with an experience that has an influence above forecasts. If human logic can play a role in horse racing, this is not much more than 55%. This is an area where you do not dominate. There are men who love this glorious uncertainty and have the choice between an unexpected disappointment and unexpected joy.

PL: You’re in a traditional costume of your communities. You get on a plane supersonic two hours later you find yourself on a site in Sardinia with a group of entrepreneurs. Psychological adjustment must be difficult? The space of an airplane and the “living God” becomes promoter.

[Google translation] Moreover, “living God” is an expression false. A man is not God. You see the Imam with Christian eyes…. [F]ar be it from me to want to criticize and judge the Vatican … nor to say that design is superior to another. I seek only to explain that we should not judge life of Imam according to the same basic ideas that govern a Christian religious man, in order that there be no misunderstanding.

AK: Not at all. Moreover, “living God” is an expression false. A man is not God. You see the Imam with Christian eyes. The Church, to some extent, was held out of life “civil”. Celibacy for priests gives an idea of daily life of their own. The Prophet, himself, had children, he has been at war, he participated in a trade. It was human activity. Since all the imams of human occupation. Our religion is also a way of life. For you, the Church does not assume certain ongoing responsibilities. For us, religion should be involved, have a global sense, far be it from me to want to criticize and judge the Vatican … nor to say that design is superior to another. I seek only to explain that we should not judge life of Imam according to the same basic ideas that govern a Christian religious man, in order that there be no misunderstanding.

PL: A misunderstanding, there did not about your holiday resort in Sardinia, when it is displayed as a “paradise of millionaires”?

AK: It is a way of presenting things. It has been attracting customers choose to launch a new tourist center. We talked about Sardinia as a whole vacation that I built only a few friends rich and famous. It’s more. The first year we have welcomed 3,000 people. The second: 14,000. The number rose to 20,000 in 1968. And we expect 40,000 by 1969. Do you think it is possible to attract 40,000 billionaires?

PL: It has been hard for you to endure psychological shocks close: two deaths in two years.

AK: The loss of two beloved members of my family has been very painful. Our family seems very scattered because of its international activities. However, we have always been very close one another.

PL: Your induction that followed you grief you imposed responsibilities beyond perhaps a man of your age?

AK: The responsibilities, I knew them before wearing: my grandfather had “caused” all members of the family by imposing the travel experience. We all knew basically. I do not mean events like horse racing with which he had to familiarize myself, but work in our community. Admittedly, my enthronement took place at a time of global political sensitivity. But I knew all the leaders of the community. I suddenly became responsible for twenty million human beings, but I was assisted by a competent team that my grandfather himself had created.

PL: Have you been alone, isolated at least on some days?

[Google translation] Any man, facing a difficult solution, has a certain loneliness. But my days are taken. I hardly have time to think about myself.

AK: Any man, facing a difficult solution, has a certain loneliness. But my days are taken. I hardly have time to think about myself. I have my moments of fatigue, anxiety, but without the feeling of abandonment. I am engaged. I have to weigh, consider, try to make a wise decision. But, with my advisers, I escape the isolation. “Responsibility is a burden we love.”

PL: Did not you feel sometimes, being a young man who thinks only of living, to discharge this burden of religious or other responsibilities?

AK: Do not speak above a burden! I received my grandfather heavy responsibilities, but not heavy. This is not dependent. It is a pleasure to devote to such a community, to work for men. The responsibilities are a burden that we love to wear. Only when a company is not engaged is a real burden.

PL: But would not you could just be a religious leader without being an economic leader, without trying to improve the condition of the Ismailis and have a sort of philanthropic activity?

AK: I’ve never asked the question: in Islam, the duty of a man, even religious, is to participate, to improve the lives of every day.

PL: In these circumstances, do you have the right, as Imam to take risks with your life, not least by driving your cars?

AK: If you were thinking the risks inherent in any action, we would never act. I travel for my pleasure and if I happen to go fast, in an attempt to save human time. I do not drive for fun, but to reduce what separates men. It is true that I made ski races, but now I am no longer competitive.

PL: Are you happy through all your activities?

[Google translation] Happiness for me is to offer its conclusion to a project, especially when it serves the Ismailis.

AK: Happiness for me is to offer its conclusion to a project, especially when it serves the Ismailis.

PL: You do, however, neither military nor political power, only a spiritual force. You know what Stalin said about the pope: “The Pope has how many divisions?”

AK: The divisions are not part of everyday life. In wartime, of course, it takes with them. But in peacetime, they are not necessary for men to have a better standard of living or education.

PL: How would you do if by chance the Ismailis were persecuted?

AK: It is a difficult problem. I prefer not to answer. A spiritual authority must do so without being recognized.

PL: What influences your personal life?

AK: My work.

PL: Is it Harvard University that you acquired this sense of organization?

AK: Harvard was a thrilling experience, with a possibility of almost limitless knowledge: there is a choice between 430 course.

PL: When you know your schedule, we understand that you can not lead a worldly life that you are ready.

AK: My social life is practically nonexistent. As an owner of racehorses, I can be in the galleries of the day Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, is all. I can be on the beach in Sardinia, summer, but practically all my time is devoted to the Ismailis, in Sardinia. In Muslim life, you have to live life everyday. It was therefore impossible to stay cloister, away from even mundane events. Always face.

PL: Are you going to shows “Paris”?

[Google translation] In cinema, once a month, with a preference for westerns. Gauchos délassent like detective novels.

AK: In cinema, once a month, with a preference for westerns. Gauchos délassent like detective novels. I do not go to theater, concerts, exhibitions and I am easily a reason. Leaving half past eight in the office, I think especially at dinner to resume work.

PL: Do you have time to read and, in this case, is to learn or distract you?

AK: I do not read now works useful for my work and its future.

PL: You realize, looking at your whole life, there is little room for fun and leisure.

AK: Tell yourself that no relaxation occurs to me that the work and, in lesser part of the sport, horses, skiing.

[Google translation] I was deeply pleased with the reinstatement of the Ismailis who came to be in Pakistan after the events that you know in India. They lived for four or five years in huts made of mud drains. Refugees were ruined. We gave them the means to save cost. They now have gardens, schools, mosques. I participated in this revival that gave me great satisfaction.

PL: What has been your greatest joy in recent years?

AK: I can not give you a definite answer, but I was deeply pleased with the reinstatement of the Ismailis who came to be in Pakistan after the events that you know in India. They lived for four or five years in huts made of mud drains. Refugees were ruined. We gave them the means to save cost. They now have gardens, schools, mosques. I participated in this revival that gave me great satisfaction.

PL: Despite the image of the Aga Khan to the billions of diamonds, are you still close enough to reality to know the price of things?

AK: It must be so when it comes to making available to poor people in homes or products to the extent that they can afford. I do not mean that I do my market and I know the price of a kilo of butter, but I can tell you what a family spends an average of Ismaili for a lifestyle than a year in Pakistan, East Africa elsewhere. By studying variations in these figures that happens whether a programme can produce results.

PL: You have an Iranian passport and a British passport but you have Iranian nationality. So here you are promoting, somehow, the Iranian community?

AK: Absolutely not. As Pope, I have a function that goes beyond nationality.

PL: It is often spoken of “homesickness”. You can not have it. There is not one where you can say: “I’m going home”?

AK: I do not have a country to me.

PL: Do not talk about country, but home. When you think about your birthplace, what do you feel?

AK: I have not had a childhood home. At eight years, I entered a boarding school to get out to seventeen. After boarding, the University until twenty-one. And then, a series of houses where people do not live there enough to retrieve memories alive. What I like what I feel before a country or a house is an office. A nest at work, if you want, where you spend most of your working life. However, the Ismailis, I always get at home, not in the office. They come as Imam in a traditional privacy .

PL: Do you wear your suit often?

AK: When I’m traveling and for official ceremonies.

[Google translation] There is no true refuge against sadness. It is a cons fatigue is there are true, sometimes the sister of sadness. Sadness is often because we are too tired. In this case, the refuge is to leave the office, escape the phone. The next day, the office becomes a refuge.

PL: When you are sad, you have the comfort of religion. But you spoke with emotion of your office. Is this your true refuge?

AK: There is no true refuge against sadness. It is a cons fatigue is there are true, sometimes the sister of sadness. Sadness is often because we are too tired. In this case, the refuge is to leave the office, escape the phone. The next day, the office becomes a refuge.

PL: Have you ever regret not having had a childhood like any other carefree?

AK: I can not, anyway, sorry for the things I never knew. If you have never had a drink, you can not pretend that you are missing. We may, at a pinch, you blame a lack of curiosity, but that’s another story. Actually I have not had the feeling of having missed something. On the contrary. The set of responsibilities is still the best way to have fun.

[Google translation] You may be concerned in the effort, to the point of decision, after serving your conscience. And then there’s some point where you rely to a greater willingness than yours. You rely on God and the peace comes. When you have a tough decision, belief is an absolutely no comparison.

PL: The impression of serenity that you release, is it just religious?

AK: Maybe. You may be concerned in the effort, to the point of decision, after serving your conscience. And then there’s some point where you rely to a greater willingness than yours. You rely on God and the peace comes. When you have a tough decision, belief is an absolutely no comparison.

PL: Finally, a question I posed to a Christian philosopher: technology, according to you, it does not compete with God? With advances in science, people who were dying, they prolonged twenty years. Contraception prevents planned for unborn human beings come into the world. We transplant hearts, we add the kidneys, livers. Man competes with God?

AK: No. There is no limit to the power of God. Even the successes of modern medicine are additional proofs of the unlimited power of Allah. It is He who wishes to give to mankind a chance to prolong their worldly life, in so far as it is not illusory. Landing on the moon shows less the power of man than the power of God. Allah has put in the universe much more than what humans have thought to see. It is for this reason existence is exciting and one should act fully, participating as much as possible in everything of life that represents dignity and eternal hope. (2)

Original transcript in French

Paul Giannoli l’a rencontré pour ELLE: aujourd’hui, il n’appartient plus aux mille et une nuits mais c’est un jeune homme bien inséré dans son époque. Karim Aga Khan est moins un “dieu vivant”, qu’un homme d’affaires et un chef religieux responsable de millions d’âmes qui n’a presque plus de temps pour les plaisirs de la vie.

Paul Giannoli: Vos interviews sont rares. Vous êtes de ces quelques personnalités qui n’ont pas besoin de publicité, quelle qu’elle soit. Au reste, on vous traduit trop pour ne pas vous trahir. Le reflet que donne de vous la presse occidentale est trop souvent déformé ou incomplet. Vous êtes comme les icebergs dont la partie la plus importante est celle qu’on ne voit pas. Ce qu’on voit d’un des chefs religieux le plus important du monde, c’est sa photo dans un dîner ou au pesage.

His Highness the Aga Khan: Il est vrai que je cherche à éviter les interviews. La grande presse présente les événements pour le grand public: il peut lui arriver de sacrifier les aspects profonds pour les côtés pittoresques. Après onze ans de vie semi-publique, je m’y suis fait. Je n’interviens que si les journaux attaquent, même si indirectement, ma position d’Imam, la foi des Ismailis ou la foi musulmane en général. J’ai déjà dû intervenir dans certains pays lorsqu’il l’a fallut.

PL: Vos fidèles éparpillés dans le monde doivent éprouver une certaine surprise quand ils découvrent votre vie à travers la presse occidentale?

AK: Je pense que les Ismailis savent qu’un journal a la liberté de pensée et qu’on ne peut pas toujours agir. C’est d’ailleurs vrai pour d’autres que moi. Regardez le Pape: il ne peut pas intervenir si l’on veut écrire contre lui. Ce qui est sensible aux Ismailis à travers l’univers, c’est moins de voir ma photo à un bal mondain que le travail que j’accomplis dans le monde.

PL: Votre position est singulière. Vous êtes un chef religieux et un chef d’Etat sans patrie, sans capitale.

AK: En fait, la communauté ismailie a un centre: l’Imam. Il est au coeur de toute activité.

PL: La patrie, est-ce donc là où vous êtes?

AK: Ne mêlez pas ce qui n’est pas religieux à ce qui l’est. Le centre de la vie religieuse et de l’activité quotidienne est concentré autour de l’Imam. Mais les ismailis sont des citoyens à part entière des Etats dans lesquels ils vivent. Ils ont une religion: l’ismailisme, une nationalité, pakistanaise, indienne, kenyenne ou autre. Les tribunaux appliquent la loi du pays, sauf dans le cas où nous avons notre loi. Alors ils reconnaissent généralement ce que les tribunaux ismailis ont décrété. “Il n’y a pas d’Etat ismaili comme il y a un Etat d’Israël”

PL: Pouvons-nous comparer les Ismailis aux juifs dont la grande question est de savoir si l’appartenance religieuse doit passer avant la nationalité?

AK: La politique internationale nous affecte, mais nous ne sommes pas engagés comme les juifs dans la défense d’un Etat d’Israël. Il n’y a pas un Etat ismaili.

PL: Pensez-vous que l’Ismailisme puisse jouer un rôle international, intervenir dans les affaires du monde?

AK: Il a pu exercer une certaine influence dans le passé; ainsi, au temps de mon grand-père et en ce qui me concerne au cours de ces onze dernières années. Non seulement sur le plan politique, économique, mais social. Si pour une raison grave, les Ismailis décidaient de se retirer en masse d’un pays déterminé, il se pourrait que ce soit une façon comme une autre de faire pencher la balance.

PL: Comment peut-on montrer au grand public la différence qu’il y a entre les Ismailis et les Musulmans?

AK: Il n’y a pas de problème: les Ismailis sont des Musulmans. Mais la religion des Musulmans est divisée en deux grandes branches: les sonites et les chiites, comme la religion de Chrétiens est divisée en catholiques et en protestants. Les Ismailis font partie des chiites. Les chiites attribuent aux membres de la famille du prophète une position particulière dans la religion musulmane et, comme ma famille descend de la famille d’Ali, nous sommes un rameau dans la branche chiite. Il y a bien d’autres rameaux: autrefois, le Yémen, l’Egypte étaient chiites, aujourd’hui une partie de l’Irak est chiite, l’Iran est chiite.

PL: Pour les Ismailis, l’Imam est-il l’équivalent du pape pour les catholiques?

AK: Sur le plan spirituel, peut-être. Comme le pape, l’Imam donne des directives sur la pratique de la foi. sur le plan dogmatique, non. Le pape est élu. L’Imam a une fonction héréditaire.

PL: Vous faites respecter les lois et les dogmes et, le cas échéant, avec un pouvoir de sanction?

AK: Je décide. Mais le pouvoir de sanction est propre à notre religion. En cas de faute grave, il n’y a pas d'”excommunication” au sens catholique du mot et, dans la mesure où cette comparaison n’est pas au fautif le droit de pratiquer sa religion: c’est un droit qui lui est acquis par le fait que Dieu lui a donné une âme et qu’il a toujours la faculté de la lui soumettre. Il est temporairement exclu de l’organisation non religieuse de la communauté, il ne bénéficie plus de certains avantages, mais il garde le droit de prier, d’être enterré selon nos rites.

PL: Donc vous êtes chef religieux. Mais vous êtes en même temps, aux yeux de la société moderne, un jeune milliardaire. Un des proverbes de l’ère atomique, c’est “Etre riche comme l’Aga Khan”

AK: Il y a bien des hommes plus riches que moi, au sens personnel du mot. Beaucoup de biens sont au nom de l’Imam parce que c’est le chef de la communauté, sans qu’il s’agisse de biens personnels. Par exemple, des écoles, des hôpitaux. Ce qui a contribué à cette légende, c’est le faste des jubilés. Mon grand-père a eu un imamat de 72 ans. Les Ismailis qui lui étaient très attachés on tenu à le remercier publiquement à certains tournants de sa vie. Ils ont choisi de lui donner périodiquement son poids en pierres et métaux précieux. Mais ces pesés fabuleuses se métamorphosent en institutions à travers le monde, fondées avec l’argent symboliquement offert à l’Imam.

PL: Imaginez-vous qu’on vous mette sur une balance, vous, un jeune homme moderne. Ne trouveriez-vous pas cette cérémonie un peu bizarre?

AK: Vous savez, un des rôles de l’Imam est de tenir la foi à jour, de guider la tradition sans la modifier systématiquement. Le problème ne s’est pas présenté. Les jubilés ont lieu tous les vingt ans. Je ne suis Imam que depuis onze ans. Dans neuf ans, je ne peux pas prédire les voeux des Ismailis ni ma décision. “Je vis matériellement en Occident, mais psychologiquement je suis plus près de l’Islam.”

PL: Il doit être difficile d’occuper votre position. Vous êtes un chef musulman mais, par vos études et votre vie, vous êtes aussi un “produit” de la société occidentale.

AK: Ce n’est pas tout à fait exact. Certes, j’ai été plus de neuf ans dans les grandes écoles suisses et trois ans et demi aux U.S.A. Mais j’ai été aussi un élève oriental. J’ai suivi, tout enfant, des cours dans la communauté ismailie avant d’étudier à travers le monde et j’ai mon diplôme d’histoire musulmane. Je vis matériellement en Occident, mais psychologiquement, personnellement, je suis beaucoup plus près de l’Islam.

PL: Alors, pourquoi viviez-vous surtout en Occident?

AK: En partie, pour être en contact avec les conceptions modernes et espérer les appliquer aux pays en voie de développement: voyager à travers l’Occident me permet de me tenir au courant du progrès et aussi d’échapper à une position politique locale.

PL: Il est sans doute malaisé de mener de front la religion musulmane et l’industrialisation ismailie. Comment faire marcher les usines, par exemple, au rythme de la production atomique, alors que les Musulmans doivent prier cinq fois par jour et respecter le Ramadan?

AK: Il y a des problèmes pratiques, c’est certain. Ce ne sont pas les plus faciles à résoudre. Le développement de l’économie ismailie est lié à des conceptions occidentales qui ne sont pas les nôtres. Mais l’Imam a le droit de décider sur beaucoup de questions pratiques. Quand une communauté musulmane n’a pas d’Imam, l’Etat peut décréter que les usines ne doivent pas s’arrêter cinq fois par jour ou que le Ramadan ne doit pas ralentir le rendement. Dans quelle mesure peut-on adapter nos conceptions à celles de l’Occident, est un travail délicat de tous les jours. Jusqu’à présent je crois que nous avons réussi à garder une formation d’esprit tout à fait musulmane, avec une pratique de la religion active et positive, en conservant une expansion matérielle qui est loin d’être négligeable.

PL: C’est votre grand-père qui a permis que le port du voile ne soit plus obligatoire. Etait-ce une mesure révolutionnaire quand il l’a fait?

AK: C’était une mesure audacieuse, mais plus sociale que religieuse. A l’origine, le port du voile n’avait rien d’islamique et le voile était porté en Arabie pré-islamique. Le voile c’était, au départ, ce qui distinguait une femme libre d’une esclave. La femme esclave ne portait pas de voile; elle pouvait s’acheter ou s’échanger. La femme qui portait le voile n’était pas à la disposition de la société. Le voile est devenu, non plus un symbole, mais un folklore.

PL: Quand votre grand-père a pris cette mesure, était-il sûr de ne pas aller à l’encontre des voeux de la majorité?

AK: Non. Il s’agissait de l’application pratique d’une question qui lui paraissait plus sociale que religieuse et cette décision a été chaleureusement accueillie.

PL: Pourriez-vous prendre des décisions de cette importance?

AK: Sans aucun doute. La difficulté est de pressentir l’heure ou la mesure dans laquelle on peut corriger une contrainte. Quand on ne déçoit pas ceux qui se considèrent évolués. on décourage ceux qui restent dans la tradition.

PL: Nous parlions tout à l’heure des femmes voilées et non voilées. Avez- vous une conception occidentale ou musulmane du mariage?

AK: Je n’aime pas parler du mariage. On a tellement écrit de choses fausses à ce sujet. J’estime qu’aucun homme ayant une fonction publique n’est obligé de parler de sa vie privée.

PL: Je voulais dire qu’à mon avis, il serait bien difficile à une femme de partager votre vie, à cause de vos responsabilités.

AK: Je ne sais pas. Je ne suis pas marié. Vous en conclurez ce que vous voudrez. “Mon écurie de courses, c’est un passe-temps, pas une vocation”

PL: Comment faites-vous pour que toutes ces activités ne se contredisent pas en vous? Elles constituent une chaîne de travail permanent, en dépit des mondanités officielles.

AK: Pour moi, la notion de vacances n’existe pas. je dois accomplir ma fonction d’Imam sans arrêt, jusqu’à ma mort. Un ministre peut s’en aller: quelqu’un assure son intérim pendant le mois où il part en congé. Ce n’est pas mon cas. La fonction d’Imam s’attache à ma personne. Je dois me donner tout entier à l’activité qu’elle symbolise, tenter d’apprendre tout ce qu’un esprit humain peut retenir. Ce qui est passionnant et extraordinaire, c’est d’emmagasiner des expériences pour les distribuer ailleurs, qu’elles soient bancaires comme au Kenya, ou touristiques comme en Sardaigne. Aucune activité ne doit être limité, sauf celle qui concerne les chevaux de courses. J’ai une écurie. C’est un hobby. Ce n’est pas une vocation.

PL: Ce qui vous plaît dans les chevaux, est-ce la victoire ou l’amélioration d’une race?

AK: D’abord, on aime les chevaux, ou on ne les aime pas. Ensuite, le turf, c’est le terrain de l’inconnu où la joie d’une surprise est toujours possible. Vous avez des affaires où la réussite peut être de 75% avec une expérience qui a une influence sus les prévisions. Si la logique humaine peut jouer un rôle dans les courses de chevaux, ce n’est pas pour beaucoup plus de 55%. C’est un domaine où vous ne dominez jamais . Il y a des hommes qui aiment cette glorieuse incertitude et avoir le choix entre une déception inattendue et une joie inespérée.

PL: Vous êtes en costume traditionnel dans une de vos communautés. Vous montez dans un avion supersonique et deux heures après, vous vous retrouvez sur un chantier de Sardaigne avec un groupe d’entrepreneurs. L’adaptation psychologique doit être difficile? L’espace d’un avion et le “Dieu vivant” devient promoteur.

AK: Pas du tout. D’ailleurs, “Dieu vivant” est une expression fausse. Un homme n’est pas un Dieu. Vous voyez l’Imam avec des yeux de chrétien. L’Eglise, dans une certaine mesure, s’est tenue hors de la vie “civile”. Le célibat donne aux prêtres une idée de l’existence quotidienne qui leur est propre. Le Prophète, lui, a eu des enfants, il a été à la guerre, il a participé à un commerce. Il a eu activité d’être humain. Depuis, tous les imams ont des occupations d’homme. Notre religion est, aussi, une façon de vivre. Pour vous, l’Eglise ne doit pas assumer certaines responsabilités courantes. Pour nous, la religion doit y participer, avoir un sens global; loin de moi l’idée de vouloir critiquer et juger le Vatican… ni de dire qu’une conception est supérieure à une autre. Je ne cherche qu’à expliquer qu’il ne faut pas juger la vie de l’Imam selon les mêmes conceptions de base régissant celle d’un homme religieux chrétien, ceci afin qu’il n’y ait pas de malentendu.

PL: Un malentendu, n’y en a-t-il pas un à propos de votre centre de vacances de Sardaigne, quand on le montre comme un “paradis de milliardaires”?

AK: C’est une façon de présenter les choses. Il a fallu attirer des clients de choix pour lancer un nouveau centre touristique. On a parlé de la Sardaigne comme d’un ensemble de vacances que j’aurais construit uniquement pour quelques amis riches et célèbres. C’est plus. La première année, nous y avons accueilli 3000 personnes. La seconde: 14000. Le nombre est monté à 20000 en 1968. Et nous en prévoyons 40000 en 1969. Croyez-vous qu’il soit possible d’attirer 40000 milliardaires?

PL: Il a dû être dur pour vous de supporter des chocs psychologiques rapprochés: deux décès en deux ans.

AK: La perte de deux membres très chers de ma famille a été très pénible. Notre famille semble très éparpillée en raison de ses activités internationales. Il n’empêche que nous avons toujours été très près les un des autres.

PL: Votre intronisation que a suivi vous deuils vous a imposé des responsabilités qui dépassaient peut-être un homme de votre âge?

AK: Les responsabilités, je les connaissais avant de les endosser: mon grand-père avait “entraîné” tous les membres de la famille en leur imposant l’expérience des voyages. Nous étions tous au courant pour l’essentiel. Je ne parle pas d’activités comme celle des chevaux de course avec laquelle il a fallu me familiariser, mais des activités propres à notre communauté. Certes, mon intronisation a eu lieu à une époque de politique mondiale délicat. Mais je connaissais tous les leaders de la communauté. Je devenais brusquement responsable de vingt millions d’êtres humains, mais j’étais secondé par une équipe compétente que mon grand-père lui- même avait créée.

PL: Vous êtes-vous trouvé seul, isolé du moins, certains jours?

AK: N’importe quel homme, en face d’une solution difficile, a une certaine solitude. Mais mes journées sont très prises. Je n’ai guère le temps de penser à moi. J’ai mes moments de fatigue, d’inquiétude, mais sans avoir le sentiment d’abandon. Je suis engagé. Je dois peser, réfléchir, tenter de prendre une décision sage. Mais, avec mes conseillers, j’échappe à l’isolement. “La responsabilité c’est un fardeau qu’on aime.”

PL: N’avez-vous pas envie, parfois, d’être un jeune homme qui ne pense qu’à vivre, à se décharger de ce fardeau de responsabilités religieuses ou autres?

AK: Ne parlez surtout pas de fardeau! J’ai reçu de mon grand-père de lourdes responsabilités, mais qui ne sont pas pesantes. Ce n’est pas à charge. C’est un bonheur de se consacrer à une telle communauté, de travailler pour des hommes. Les responsabilités sont un fardeau que l’on aime porter. C’est seulement lorsqu’on n’est pas engagé qu’une entreprise est un vrai fardeau.

PL: Mais n’auriez-vous pas pu vous contenter d’être un chef religieux sans être un chef économique, sans chercher à améliorer la condition des Ismailis et à avoir une activité en quelque sorte philanthropique?

AK: Je ne me suis jamais posé la question: en Islam, le devoir d’un homme, même religieux, est de participer, d’améliorer aussi la vie de chaque jour.

PL: Dans ces conditions, avez-vous le droit, en tant qu’Imam de prendre des risques avec votre vie, ne serait-ce qu’en pilotant vos bolides?

AK: Si on devait penser aux risques que comporte toute action, on n’agirait jamais. Je ne voyage par pour mon plaisir et s’il m’arrive d’aller vite, c’est pour tenter de gagner du temps humain. Je ne conduis pas pour le divertissement, mais pour diminuer ce qui sépare les hommes. Il est vrai que j’ai fait des courses de ski, mais maintenant je ne fais plus de compétition.

PL: Etes-vous heureux à travers toutes vos activités?

AK: Le bonheur, pour moi, c’est d’offrir sa conclusion à un projet, surtout quand il est au service des Ismailis.

PL: Vous n’avez pourtant ni armée ni pouvoirs politiques, seulement une force spirituelle. Vous savez ce que Staline disait du pape: “Le pape a combien de divisions?”

AK: Les divisions ne font pas partie de la vie quotidienne. En temps de guerre, bien sûr, il faut compter avec elles. Mais en temps de paix, elles ne sont pas nécessaires pour que les hommes aient un meilleur niveau d’existence ou d’éducation.

PL: Comment feriez-vous si par aventure les Ismailis étaient persécutés?

AK: C’est un problème délicat. Je préfère ne pas répondre. Une autorité spirituelle doit alors agir sans se faire reconnaître.

PL: Qu’est-ce qui influence votre vie personnelle?

AK: Mon travail.

PL: Est-ce à l’Université de Harvard que vous avez acquis ce sens de l’organisation?

AK: Harvard a été une expérience passionnante, avec une possibilité de connaissances pratiquement sans limites: on a le choix entre 430 cours. “Ma seule sortie: le cinéma une fois par mois”

PL: Quand on connaît votre emploi du temps, on comprend que vous ne pouvez pas mener la vie mondaine qu’on vous prête.

AK: Ma vie mondaine est pratiquement inexistante. En tant que propriétaire de chevaux de courses, je puis être aux tribunes le jour du Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, c’est tout. Je puis être sur la plage, en Sardaigne, l’été, mais, pratiquement, tout mon temps est consacré aux Ismailis, même en Sardaigne. Dans la vie musulmane, il faut faire vivre la vie de tous les jours. On n’a donc pas la possibilité de rester cloître, à l’écart des manifestations même mondaines. Il faut toujours faire face.

PL: Allez-vous aux spectacles “parisiens”?

AK: Au cinéma, une fois par mois, avec une préférence pour les westerns. Les gauchos délassent comme les romans policiers. Je ne vais guère au théâtre, au concert, aux expositions et je me fais facilement une raison. En sortant à huit heures et demie du bureau, je pense surtout à dîner pour reprendre le travail.

PL: Avez-vous le temps de lire et, dans ce cas, est-ce pour apprendre ou vous distraire?

AK: Je ne lis plus maintenant que des oeuvres utiles pour mon travail et son avenir.

PL: On se rend compte, en regardant l’ensemble de votre vie, qu’il y a peu de place pour le plaisir et le loisir.

AK: Dites-vous bien que la détente ne me vient que du travail et, en partie moindre du sport: les chevaux, le ski.

PL: Quelle a été votre plus grande joie ces dernières années?

AK: Il m’est impossible de vous donner une réponse catégorique, mais j’ai été profondément heureux de la réintégration des Ismailis qui sont venus s’implanter au Pakistan après les événements que vous savez aux Indes. Ils ont vécu pendant quatre ou cinq ans dans des huttes faites de la boue des égouts. C’étaient des réfugiés ruinés. On leur a donné les moyens de se sauver économiquement. Ils ont maintenant des jardins, des écoles, des mosquées. J’ai participé à ce renouveau qui m’a procuré une grande satisfaction.

PL: Malgré l’image de l’Aga Khan aux milliards de diamants, êtes-vous quand même assez près de la réalité pour savoir le prix des choses?

AK: Il le faut bien quand il s’agit de mettre à la disposition des gens pauvres des logements ou des produits à la mesure de ce qu’ils peuvent payer. Je ne veux pas dire que je fais mon marché et que je connais le prix d’un kilo de beurre mais je peux vous dire ce que dépense en moyenne une famille ismailie pour un train de vie d’un an au Pakistan, en Afrique orientale ou ailleurs. C’est en étudiant les variations de ces chiffres qu’on arrive à savoir si un programme peut donner des résultats.

PL: Vous avez un passeport iranien et un passeport anglais mais vous avez la nationalité iranienne. Vous favorisez donc là, en quelque sorte, la communauté iranienne?

AK: Absolument pas. Comme le Pape, j’ai une fonction que dépasse le cadre de la nationalité.

PL: On parle souvent du “mal du pays”. Vous ne pouvez pas l’avoir. Il n’en est pas un où vous pouvez dire : “Je rentre chez moi”?

AK: Je n’ai pas un pays à moi. “Ma maison, c’est mon bureau: un nid à travail.”

PL: Ne parlons pas de pays, mais de maison. Quand vous pensez à votre maison natale, que ressentez-vous?

AK: Je n’ai pas eu une maison d’enfance. A huit ans, je suis entré dans un pensionnat pour en sortir à dix-sept. Après le pensionnat, l’Université jusqu’à vingt et un. Et puis, toute une série de maisons où l’on n’habite pas assez pour y retrouver des souvenirs vivants. Ce que j’aime, ce que je ressens, avant un pays ou une maison, c’est un bureau. Un nid à travail, si vous voulez, où vous passez l’essentiel de votre vie active. Pourtant, les Ismailis, je les reçois toujours à la maison, pas au bureau. Ils viennent me voir en tant qu’Imam dans une intimité traditionnelle.

PL: Portez-vous souvent votre costume?

AK: Quand je suis en voyage et pour des cérémonies officielles.

PL: Quand vous êtes triste, vous avez le réconfort de la religion. Mais vous avez parlé avec émotion de votre bureau. Est-ce votre vrai refuge?

AK: Il n’est point de vrai refuge contre la tristesse. Il en est un contre la fatigue qui est, il es vrai, parfois la soeur de la tristesse. La tristesse vient souvent du fait que l’on est trop fatigué. Dans ce cas, le refuge c’est de quitter le bureau, d’échapper au téléphone. Le lendemain, le bureau redevient le refuge.

PL: N’avez-vous jamais eu le regret de ne pas avoir eu d’enfance insouciante comme les autres?

AK: Je ne peux pas, de toute façon, regretter une chose que je n’ai pas connue. Si vous n’avez jamais pris d’alcool, vous ne pouvez pas prétendre qu’il vous manque. On peut, à la rigueur, vous reprocher un manque de curiosité, mais c’est une autre histoire. Réellement je n’ai pas eu la sensation d’avoir manqué quelque chose. Au contraire. Le jeu des responsabilités est encore le meilleur moyen de se distraire. “Il n’y a pas de dimensions au pouvoir de Dieu.”

PL: L’impression de sérénité que vous dégagez est-elle seulement religieuse?

AK: Peut-être. Vous pouvez être inquiet dans l’effort, jusqu’au seuil de la décision, après avoir agi en votre âme et conscience. Et puis, il y a un certain moment où vous vous en remettez à une volonté plus grande que la vôtre. Vous vous en remettez à Dieu et le calme vient. Quand vous avez une décision difficile à prendre, la croyance est un élément absolument sans comparaison.

PL: Pour terminer, une question que j’ai déjà posée à un philosophe chrétien: la technologie, selon vous, ne fait-elle pas concurrence à Dieu? Avec les progrès de la science, les gens qui devaient mourir, on les prolonge de vingt ans. La contraception empêche de naître des êtres prévus pour venir au monde. On greffe des coeurs, on ajoute des reins, des foies. L’homme rivalise avec Dieu?

AK: Non. Il n’y a pas de dimensions au pouvoir de Dieu. Même les réussites de la médecine moderne sont des preuves supplémentaire de la puissance sans limite d’Allah. C’est lui qui veut bien donner aux hommes la chance de prolonger leur vie terrestre dans la mesure où elle n’est pas illusoire. Atterrir sur la Lune montre moins la force de l’homme que celle de Dieu. Allah a mis dans l’univers beaucoup plus que ce que les êtres humains ont cru voir. C’est pour cette raison que l’existence est une chose passionnante et qu’il faut agir à plein, en s’efforçant de participer dans la mesure du possible à tout ce que la vie représente de dignité et d’éternel espoir…

NOTES

  1. This interview is often mistaken for a supposedly recent one by Paul Guinanolli of Elite Magazine. We are not aware of any interview — recent or old — of His Highness the Aga Khan by Elite Magazine.
  2. Passages which have been translated manually (i.e. not Google).

SOURCES

  • Elle Magazine (France), 20 August 1969
  • French text (secondary source): ismaili.net

POSSIBLY RELATED READINGS (GENERATED AUTOMATICALLY)