Our history, our interpretation of our faith, is anchored in the intellect and we rejoice in investing in the human intellect. It’s part of the ethics of what we believe in and it’s part of what we believe distinguishes us, obviously, from the environment in which we live. So the agreement that we have is giving us new opportunities to widen our exposure to education in the industrialised world, but to widen that education within a context where our values are the same. And that it is very important, because it’s clear with a global community — such as the Ismaili community — we need to invest in global values, in values which can be applied to any society, at any time in any part of the world. [Emphasis original.]

 
Madame Prime Minister, I want to tell you how happy and grateful my community and I are for this agreement that we have just signed.

Our history, our interpretation of our faith, is anchored in the intellect and we rejoice in investing in the human intellect. It’s part of the ethics of what we believe in and it’s part of what we believe distinguishes us, obviously, from the environment in which we live. So the agreement that we have is giving us new opportunities to widen our exposure to education in the industrialised world, but to widen that education within a context where our values are the same. And that it is very important, because it’s clear with a global community — such as the Ismaili community — we need to invest in global values, in values which can be applied to any society, at any time in any part of the world. And this what we are finding in Canada — that we will have a partnership with you — and in investing in that partnership we’re investing in a profession which, I have to say, has difficulty in the developing world. [Emphasis original.]

There are three professions in the developing world which are undervalued. The first is nursing. The second is education. And the third is journalism. And yet all those professions are critical for the development of a quality civil society in the third world. And the partnership you have allowed us to create, is going to come in and assist us to reposition one of the greatest professions that we need in the third world. So I would as you to think of this not only in terms of what we will be able to achieve in terms of collaboration, but in the much wider context of the teaching profession and its position in the developing world.

But then we were discussing something else. We were discussing dialogue. We were discussing policy. We were discussing what ideas we need to move forwards in various parts of the developing world. And sharing these ideas — talking about them, openly and freely, but within the context of common values, shared values — is an absolutely wonderful opportunity. And I thank you very much for making that possible.

Thank you

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

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