As you know I attach great importance to Indian history and to the great caliphates, the great empires of the Muslim world, because I believe there’s always something to learn. The past is a place to learn, even if the future is different, and this is why I have spent considerable time in trying to enhance in India the Mughal history and to learn how the Mughals achieved global leadership.

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President and Leaders of the Jamat:

I’ve often said that it’s the Imam’s role to spoil the jamat, not the other way round. So if you’re happy, as I am happy, with the days that we spent together, then I have fulfilled my role, which is to bring happiness to my jamat. And I want to thank you for eleven magnificent days in India, for the very kind words of the President, for the wonderful music that we heard, for the wonderful organisation of the jamat, but perhaps more important than all of that is that this has been for me a visit of newly opened doors and that’s very important because it says to me that the jamat in India has a future which we can recognise, which we can identify, which we can work towards and there is a logical, clear road ahead. […?]

In 1957, many of the countries where the jamat lived were colonies, but I was always concerned about the volatility of the countries in which the jamat was living and I always felt that somehow we had to create a network of institutions around the developing world. And this meant building a number of institutions covering, essentially, civil society so that men and women could live with some confidence that, if things went wrong in a given area, there was nonetheless the institutional capacity to address the issues. And that is why I have spent time on education, on health care, on building economic institutions, on trying to achieve global standards of quality so that the jamat does not feel, in the developing world, that because it lives in the developing world, it is being short-cut on global standards of performance. […?]

The second aspect of this visit is my admiration for the way you have organised this visit and I want to compliment all the leaders of the jamat — present, not present, those who have established leadership traditions, organisational traditions — which have made it possible for me to have eleven days of enormous happiness with my jamat in India. […?]

And finally to express to you my gratitude for that lovely gift you have given me. As you know I attach great importance to Indian history and to the great caliphates, the great empires of the Muslim world, because I believe there’s always something to learn. The past is a place to learn, even if the future is different, and this is why I have spent considerable time in trying to enhance in India the Mughal history and to learn how the Mughals achieved global leadership. […?]

Lastly I say to my leaders and all the murids who are here, it’s been an enormously happy visit and I hope you will recognise from my own personal joy the confidence that I have as we build for the future. It is very exciting, indeed, and on my radar screen India is in the countries of greatest opportunity for the jamat.

Thank you.

His Highness the Aga Khan IV

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